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November 1982 S2.49y2 

Issue #266 




Push-button 
Tuning 
for the 701 

Page 14 

Set-and-Forget 
Rotator Control 

SJage 22 

Fanatic's 
Antenna Tuner 

Page 42 

■Monster 
Power Supply 

Page 56 

State-oMhe-Art 
Audio Filter 

Page 32 

Cheapo Keyer 

Page 104 



Plus 8 Morel 




Amateur Radio's 
lechnical Journal 



A Wayne Green Publication 



itf 



\ 



\ 



A PerfKt "10 

\\\ Timer, counter, logic probe— 10 
'^-' functions in atl. That's the Multi- 
Board One, and you can build it 

WA2BHB 

Remote-Control Your IC-701 

[\. I Sampler than commercial control- 

^~^ ters, thi5 home-brew unit neverthe- 

tess features push-button band 

changing and frequency selection, 

scanning, and enparKied coverage. 

N2CW 

Automatic Beam Aimer 

Here's the scoop on adding set-and- 
forget convenience to your rotator 
controL Works with most common 
control boxes K9AZG 

Life-Support System for HTs 

At home or in the car this do4t- 
yourself charger at^ accessory boK 

could be the best friend your 
handie^alkie ever had WB6BHI 

What! 

Another Audio Filter Project? 

Yup. And even the most mod- 
em receivers benefit from this QRM- 
crusher W4MLfc 

A Tuner for Antenna Fanatics 

[y [ Anyone experimenting with anten- 
^^-^ n^^ needs a darned good tuner Con- 
struct this one and save your 
finals Staff 

Digital Basics 

This IS no time to be a digital 11 1 iterate, 
Part III reveals the secrets of myltivibrat- 
ors, shift registers, and other notorious 
devices K4IPV 

The Money-Ma ker Power Supply 

ly I Need 12 volts for your transceiver? 
Save half the cost of a commercial 
unit by assembling this 2S^mp 
monster WA6TTY 

TVRO Q & A; Part III 

ff^ LNAs are eispensive, but rolling your 
own ^s a tosjng proposition. 

WHO POP 

The Sound of Silence 



\ 



y1 BeepM Your IS-iao is off the air, 
^-^ Charlie HI19BLU 



Build the Re-Fuser 

ly I It's a self -replacing fuse Why blow 
one when you can blow two? 

K5CN 

No Smohing in the Ham Shack 

fyl Overvoltage kills solid-state finals 



Protect yours for 11,00 



10 



14 



22 



26 



32 



42 



46 



56 



64 



70 



72 



N7j) 



74 



H 



Tempo MARSer 

Get the S-1 off those crowded ham 
channels. Expand your coverage 
above and below the amateur band 

..... WB6IQN 

CW and the Apple II 

| l^ The simplicity of BASIC plus the 

'^^ speed of machine language equals a 

near-perfect Morse keyboard. 

NSMR 

Everyman's Audio Amplifier 

Make this one<hip amp a perma- 
nent part of your test bench It's an 
easy proiect for beginning experi- 
menters W3KBM 



\ 



701 Remote Control— 14 

Award- Winning Program 

jTj Certificate hunters, cut your paper- 
"D work down to size Let your Pet 
track your quest for excellence. 

WB2GFE 

Speed Demon 

How fast was that? Find out with 
this wpm display for Heath's 1410 
keyer K4ZHM 

Keyer on a Shoestring 

Hams are cheap ami so is this keyer. 
Big spenders will build the deluxe, 
twochip version WBSPPV 

I Got My Ticket! Now What? 

A look at what Eimer forgot to tell you. 

N1I1 



\ 



\ 



76 



84 



90 




94 



102 



104 



106 



Never Say Die— 6 


DX— 118 


Circuits— 109p1 12 


Awards— 122 


FunI— 110 


Satellites— 124 


Ham Help— 111,146 


Reader Service— 130 


Social Events— 113 


New Products— 134 


Contests— 114 


Review— 139 


Letters- IIS 


Dealer Directory— 162 


RTTYLoop-118 


Propagation- 162 





ICOM 




tmmm 



10 Ob 

'0000 i 
fi 



oFP»ir 



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g 

6 
B n 



^ 




■■^^^^^^^^^B' 




m A 


^ Q Q 


H B 


fe u a 


@ C 


'«* 1 B 


Q O 



.i»*tas:-f 



> ^. 



MlZ^ JSl^ 



IC<2AT 



-^ J 



IC-2&A 



mip suip 



J ^v«l"^l 



t^^ - ot* - 



r^ - 



- X 



^ ^ 



IC-4AT 



1 



25 wcftt/5 memori©V2 
scanning systems in a 2''H x 
5^/^W X 7 D package is what has 
made the easy*to*use IC*25A the 
mo$t popular 2 meter FM 
mobile transceiver ever. Now 
ICOM presents the second holf 
of its mobile duo.JC-45A. The 
IC-45A covers 440^449.995 MHi. 
Both tronscaivers ore supplied 
with touchtone microphones 
ftondard, 

OuqI WO'i. Dual VFO's give 
on extra stored frequency for 
scanning ( memory scan scans 5 
memories plus 2 VFO's) and 
eoc^ VFO has a different tuning 
rate for easy QSV. 



IC25A 
IC'46A 



VFO A 

5 KHz 
5 KHz 



VFO B 

1 5 KHz 
25 KHz 



5 Memoftet. !nstcrit occ^ss 
to most used frequencies. VFO A 
information is tTonsferred to the 

selected merrory 

t^ pushing the 

write (tC-25A) or 

W/CK (IC- 

45A) 

button. 



^ 




IC-BUI 



^N^ 



Prlorfty Chonni 

Any memory channel 

may be monitored fof 

activity on a sample baslsTOTery 

5 seconds, without disruption of 

a QSO conducted on a VFO 

frequency. 

LED Bor M«lwr. Shows 
strength of received signal as 
well OS relative transmitter 
output from the fully protected 
final RF omptifier. APC 
(automotic power control) is 
used to detect SWR and adjust 
the powef output to a safe leveL 

ilmpl«K/Pupl«c Op«raHon. 

Standard 600 KHz offset Inrtializes 
into rodio at turn on. Offset moy 
be changed by pressing the 
pfjority button while in VK> 
ope#a1iorL Rotating the main 
tuning knob will rx>w change 
the offset up or down ond the 
offset will be disployad on the 
frequency readout. 

Ad|usfable Power Levets. 



IC-2SA 
IC-45A 



Hi PwT 
25 W 

low 



Lo Pwr 
1 W 
i W 



Pulling the squelch knob out 

places the unit into low power. 
Both the high and low power 
may be independently set to 

accomodate vour 
simplex/repeater requirements or 
amplifier input characteristics. 

Nor/Rirv Copabfltly* Use of 

thts button on the IC-25A or the 
W/CK button on the IC'45A. in 
the duplex mode, allows one 
touch rTX>nitoring of the repeater 
input frequency- If simpl^c 
operation is possibfe you will 
know instantly. 

Sconnlng. Pushing the S/S 
button initiates the scon 
circuitry. With the nrxxje switch 
in a memory position the unit 
will scon all 5 n-^ennories p*us the 
2 VFO frequencies. 

With ihB mode switch in a 
VFO position. tf»e unit will scan 
the entire band or the portion of 
the band defined t?y memories 
1 and 2. Full band scan or 
program band scan is selected 
from the front panel in the IC- 
25A. internally on the IC-46A. 

Both units have internally 
switched scanning choices of 
adjustable delay period after a 




coiTier is 

received then 

resume scan. 

or resume on carrier drop, 




I 



Th« Must Compod FM „ 

MobllM on mm Marii«r, Fits in ■ 
the smollest of places Stacking, 
matching Mobile Mounts for 
complete rrxjbile 
communicattOTis for youi cc^ 

iiwmoty tci^atp. When tt^' 
optional (C-BU1 backup power 
unit is fHstolled on the back of 
the IC-25A or rC-45A. rT>emorv 
will be maintained while 
transfemng the unit from power 
source to power source If the 
unit is not removed from power, 
it will maintain memory even 
when turned off with or without 
thelC-BU1, 



ICOM 



TheWbrld System 



ICOM Amefica. he 211 2-1 I6lh Ave N£ Oerievue. WA 96004 (206 >454-ai 55/0331 To^y^fwood DnNe. Suite 307, Doikis.TX 75234 (2 14)620-2750, 

Ni sKiied i^peofiOQfiorii o* oppfonjmoie and subjecr lo dicinge vAthom nonce or obljgorioa AH KIOM rodios signiiioaArty &i^e^ FCC f^giiaftora jimihng jpjnoua enr«»ora. 



5 -STORE BUYING POWER in acf ion/ 



NEVER BEFORE 
NEVER AGAIN! 




ICOM 



IC-730 




SALE! 

REGULAR S829 

$649 95 

LIMrTED TIME ONLY. 

UMITED QUANTITY 

ACT! 



KfD ALPHA 

** ALL ALPHA 
AMPLIFIERS IN STOCK 
FOR FAST DELIVERY 
CAU FOR SPECIAL PRICES 




EXAMPLE 

76PA 



REGULAn S2395 



SALE! $1799 



KENWOOD 



CAU NOW FOR 
SPECIAL PRICES 






"H^G J O 



5 '.:S' 



TS-930S 



-•^ '^. 




J ^ 



NEW 




TR-7950 

21WETERS.4S WATTS. 
21 CHAf^«£L MEMOflV 



TR-2500 




TS-830S 




AMPLIFIERS 
AVAILABLE 
AT LOW 
PRICES 



2 METER AMPLIFIER 



B-3016 

30Win. leoWout- 
REG. 5239.95 

SALE! 
$19995 



B-1016 

lOWin, leowout, 

REG. S279.95 

SALE! 
$24995 



KLM/Tri Ex 

KT-34A 

4 ELEMENT TRIBANDER 
REGULAR S389.95 

SALE! $309 

KT-34XA 

8 ELEMENT TRIBANDER 

REGULAR S569.95 

SALE! $459 

CALL FOR OTHER KLM PRICES. 

TRI EX W51 TOWER 

W/KLMKT-34A $f099 

TRI EX W51 TOWER 

w/KLM KT-34XA $1239 

TRI EX W51, 51 'TOWER 

REGULAR S999.95 $829^5 



PRICES AflE FOB CALIF EXCEPT FOR CERTAIN 

COMBINATIONS. PLEASE INQUIRE 



WY/^ 






V HANDHELDS 



2 METER 
FT-208R 



70CM 

FT-708R 

SALE! 
$28995 




FREE SHIPMENT continental^" a. 



€)<CEPT FOR SOME ALPKA. TTll EX arjc KLM fTEMS. 



SERVING HAMS 
BETTER. 




PHONE 



N^^jffh ^mif 



800 



854-6046 



.vn^ 



Bob fmfi^ro.WmJlMA 
Jim Ruiffertfi 



i.-f ' :i^ 






9:30AM to 5:30PM PACtFfC TIME. 
OVER-THE-COUNTER, 10AM to 5:30PM. 

MONDAY THROUGH SATURDAY 

CAUFOflNIA CUSTOMERS PLEASE PHONE OR VISIT USTEO STORES 



HJIM 



"MHR 



OUTLET 




ANAHEIM, CA 92801 

2620 W La Palma, 

(714) 761-3033 (213) 860-2040 

Between DisneyLanct & Kr«Mi s B«fry Farm 



BURLINGAME. CA 94010 

999 Howard Ave. (415) 342-5757 
5 miles south on lOl trom S F Aiiport 



OAKLAND, CA 94609 

2811 Telegraph Ave.. (415) 451-5757 

Hwy 24 Dowmown Left 27lh on-ramp. 

AiA'ALUANCE-AL^HA'AMECO-AMPNEt^L-ARRL'ASTf^DN 

<AVAMThBEJVCHEfl- BERK TEK-eiRO-MW'CALLSDOK-CDE 
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5375 Kearny Villa Road (714) 560-4900 
Hwy 163 & Clairemont Mesa Blvd. 

<PENTRON^PRAME<DX ENGINEE^IMQ - EIMAC ♦ HU&TLER 
i^HY-CjAJN HCOM^ iW MILLER* KENWOOD* KLM ■ LARSCM 
* LUHPJH " Mf Ti * MFJ • MCHO LOG ' MINI ■ PIWQUCTS 




VAN NUYS, CA 91401 

6265 Sepulveda Blvd.. (213) 988-2212 
San Diego Fwy a I Victory 0lvo, 

♦MIRAQE ' NVE ' PALOMAR* ROBOT -RaNN*SHURE>SWAh 
'TELE)l*reLn£>t" tempo TEN.TEC- TWISTAO 



PtiCGs. sp»ciftC0tfon$, descrtpftgns sui>fect to i:hange wftftout notfce. Cmht resiif^rfts ptease add saf&s taj(. 



INFO 



Manuscripts 

CofMrlbMtk>R5 irt the tticTTi of mam>- 
scripts with dfa'irirvgs and/pr pholon 
graphs a^e weicome and My II I be c^t- 
sidftrml fpr posaJbte public^atkan We 
can as&ume no fssponsibiltty for loss 
or ilamage to any materiai Pl^ssd 
enclose a stamped, setl-addressad 
envalopve wjth each subiniss^on. 9&y^ 
mont for the use o( any unsoH cited 
matafial' will ba mad^ upon accept 
tanca. All contributions should be dl- 
fected to th© 73 ed Ho rial offices, 
"How to Write tor 73" guidelines are 
avaMabla upon request, 

Editorial Offices: 

Pin© Street 

Paterbomugh NH 03458 

Phone: 603*924 9471 

Advertising Offices: 

Elm Street 

Peterborough NM Q3458 

Ptione: 603-924-7138 

Circulation Offices: 

E^m Street 

PeterbofDugh NH 03458 

Phorw: BCQ-924'9471 

Subscription Rates 

In t^ Unit^ Slatos arvd Possessions: 
One Year {"12 i^syos) S25.00 
Two Years {24 issues) S3S.O0 
Three Yeairs (36 issues} $53,00 

Elsewhere: 

Canada and Meji too— $27.97/1 year on- 
ly, U.S. lunds. Foreign surface 
mall— $44.97/1 year only, US. funds 
ctrawh on U.S. banlt. Forelgri air 
ma 11^ please inquire. 

To subscribe, 

renew or change 

an address: 

Write to 73, Subscript fort DBpartmeni, 
PO Box 931. Farmlngdaie NY 11737* 
For renewals arKj changes of addreSA,, 
Include the aOdress label from your 
rAO^t recent issue of ?3, For gih suE>- 
$Cr^ptions, include your name ar>d ad* 
ik9^ as well as those of giti reci- 
piems. 

Subscription 

problem or 

question: 

Wnt9 to ?3. Subscriptiofi Oefiartmeni, 
PO Box 9i3l, Famiiri9da!e NY 11737, 
Ptea&e rnciude an address label. 

73t Ammmir R^tiio's Techmcai Journal 
f^SN OOG&^lf^ is published hxxithly 
by 73, lr>c.. a sub^iary of Wayne Green, 
Inc , 80 Pine Street. Peterborough HH 
03456. Second ciass postage paid at 
Pirterbofough NH 03456 and at addi I ion- 
el rnailing offices. Entire contents copy- 
right - 1962, Wayne Greeri, Inc. All 
fig hi 3 reserved. No part of this publlca^ 
1 1 on may be reprinted or otherwl^se r^pro* 
duced without written permission from 
the publisher MIcfotilm Edition— Uni- 
Viimlty Microfilm, Ann Arbor U\ 48^06. 
Poatma3t0r Send address changes to 
73, Subscript Jon Services, PO Bojt 93!. 
Fim^ngdale NY llB/, 



R-X Noise Bridge 




4' 



Learn the truth about 
our antenna. 

its 



resonant 



it to 



your 



Find 
frecjuency. 
9 Adjust 
operating frequency quickly 
and easily. 

if there is one place in yaur station 
where you cannot risk uncertain 
results it is in yout antenna. 

The Palomar Engineers R-X ^)ojse 
Bridge teJIs you if your aritenna is 
resonant Qt not and, if it is not^ 
whether it is too long or too short. 

All this in one me^ufement 
reading. And it works iust as welt 
with ham-bandonly receivers as 
with general coverage equipment 
because it gives perfect null 
readings even when the antenna is 
not resonant. It gives resistance and 
reactance readings on dipoles, 
inverted Vees, quads, beams, 
myliiband trap dipoles and 
verticals. No station is complete 
without this up-to-date instrument. 

Why work in the dark? Your SWR 
meter or your resistance noise 
bridge tells only half the story. Get 
the instrument that really works, 
the Palomiir Engineers R-X Woise 
Bridge. Use it to check your 
antennas from 1 to 100 MHz. And 
use it in your shack to adjust 
resonant frequencies of both series 
and parallel tuned circuits. Works 
better than a dip m>eter and costs a 
lot Ibs. Send for our free brochure. 





The price is S69 95 m the U.S, and Canada. 
Add SS.Dt? Shipping;Hand(ifig 
California residents $dd sales tax. 

Fully guaranteed by the originator 
of the R X Moise Bridge. 

ORDER YOURS NOWr 



Palomar 



Box 455. Escondrdo. CA. 92025 
Phone: |714I 747-3343 




c^tiancl 




Microprocessor & Interface 



1771 
t79t 

?TLO? 

2112 

2&16 

?53? 

.'6^1 

mm 

tiao-'' 
6ao3 



24 so 
3*95 

1 49 

1 65 
4 75 

^^& 

r2 35 

2 49 

eis 

6 99 
!1 95 
IS 35 

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6d4& 
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e085A 

nzM 

S214 
a21E 
6224 
e226 
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8251 
a2S5 

AV5-2376 



12 95 

4 4g 

B95 

2 7S 

3 35 

im 

2 79 

4 49 
6^5 
6 49 
4^ 

12 3^ 



iNsa2$o 

MPMS8167 
TM$a900 

Tin 602 B 
SC-Oi 
2804^ CPU 

aoACTc 

ZBOAOvt 
2904^0 
ZSOASiO 
2&«03 



149G 
t2 75 

2 49 
55 00 

7 95 

7 49 
19^55 

7 49 

749S 
2§95 



1 Amp TO- 

PART # 



220 Voltage Regulators 

1-24 25-99 100'4rjH 



780^ (LIV1340T-5I .85 .75 .65 

7812 (LIV1340T-12) 85 .75 ,65 

7815 [LIV1340T-15) .85 ,75 ,65 

7818 (LfVI340T- 181 85 75 .65 



Linear Integrated Circuits 



B03a a§& 

LF351 75 

Lfa57 I 3Q 

LW301 45 

1 M3a7 49 

%53n §5 

M3iB 1 74 

IAI324 90 

■.*339 75 

LM3Se SO 

LM377 149 

L M3B0N 14 t 25 

LW3e3 3 29 

LiVI3e4 1 95 

LM3e6 m 

LAOe? 149 



LM3d3 

yW733 

yU741-B 

lJM741-t4 

UWI747 

tM74B 

UUt3T0 

UMT45B 

UMISOO 

iMlBS9 
UVI2900 
LIUt3900 
LM3905 
LM3914 
LM397 5 
LM39T6 
UM500 



97 
99 
IS 
35 
77 
49 

€9 

2 49 

3 49 

2 99 
69 
99 

! 49 

3 79 
3 79 
3 79 
3 29 



n^C33Q2 
MCI 45B 
MC1S14 
NE555 
^£556 

NESeS 
JMtSfi34 

f4t553a 

SSM2030 

5SM21>40 
SSM»>t4 

SSM20S5 
XR2?0S 

KFLai36 
KR4741 

xn5$B 



90 

59 

\ 39 

45 

9a 

1 25 
1 99 
225 
750 
150 
7J0 
750 
5 75 
&50 
519 
99 
t 95 
I 99 



5% Carbon Film Resistors 

We stock ail 5% standard values between 

1 Ohm and 1 IVleg Ohm. 



% Wart 



Package of 5 , , . . 

Package of 100 (one value} . 
Package of 1000 (one value} 

yj Watt 



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Package of 5 . , 

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Package of 1000 (one valuej 



25 

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Sampler box conststing of 5 each ot all 169 
slandard 5% values between 1 Ohm and 10 
'^!eg Ohm (845 pieces loTal) 
4 Watt Sampler Boji . . 25 00 

*^ Wan Sampler Bok 28. 00 

We Also Stock % Watt Re si Mors 



1% Vi Watt Metal Film Resistors 

We now stock ^11 481 Siandardt EiA values 
between 10 Ohms and 1 Meg Ohm, 

Package of 5 ....... , 45 

Package of 100 (one value) 5 50 

Bo« of 1000 lone value) . , . 28.00 



Send for our futl hne catalog of iCs. BesistOfS^ 
Capacnors, Diodes. Regulators, Crvstals, Trim 
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Mrnnmum Order $10,00 

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37387 Ford Rd. • Westfand Ml 48185 
Order Line- 1-800*521-0664 
In Michigan- 313*728-0650 *^ '^ 



4 73 Magazine * November, 1982 



^0 



O'- 



^f>^ 



The XlSBt^ and SI/^ 
offer performance and versatility 
for those who demand the ultimate! 



■i 



TR7A Transceiver 

• COISfTINUOUS FREQUEKCY COVERAGE — 1.5 to 30 MHz fuli 
receive coverage. The optional AUX7 provides to 1.5 MHz 
receive plus transmit coverage of 1 .8 to 30 MHz, for future 
Amateur bands. MARS. Embassy. Government or Commercial 
frequencies {proper authorization required). 

• Full Passband Tuning (PBT) enhances use of high rejection 
S-poJe crystat filters. 

N€w! Both 23 kHz ssb and SOO Hz cw crystal filters, and % 
kHz a-m selectivity are standard, plus provisions for two 
additional filters. These 8-pole crystal filters in conjunction 
with careful mechanical /electrical design result in realizable 
ultimate rejection in excess of 100 dB. 
[4ew! The very effective NB7 Noise Blanker is now standard. 

New? Built in lightning protection avoids damage to solid-state 
components from lightning induced transients. 

Newf Mic audio available on rear panel to facilitate phone patch 
connection. 

• State-of-the-art design combining sotid-state PA. 
up-con version, high-level double balanced 1st mixer and 
frequency synthesis provided a no tune-up, broadband, high 
dynamic range transceiver 



R7A Receiver 

• CONTINUOUS NO COMPROMISE to 30 MHz 
frequency coverage. 

• Full passband tuning (PBT). 

Newi NB7A Noise Blanker supplied as standard. 

• State-of-the-Art features of the TR7A, plus added 
flexibility with a low noise 10 dB rf amplifier. 

New? Standard ultimate selectivity choices include the 
supplied 2.3 kHz ssb and 500 Hz cw crystal filters, and 
9 kHz a-m selectivrty. Capability for three accessory 
crystal filters plus the two supplied, including 300 Hz. 
1 .8 kHz. 4 kHz, and 6 kHz, The 4 kHz filter, when used 
with the RTA's Synchro-Phase a-m detector, provides 
a-m reception with greater frequency response within a 
narrower bandwidth than conventional a-m detection. 
and sideband selection to minimize interference potential. 

• Front panel pushbutton control of rf preamp. a-m /ssb 
detector, speaker ON /OFF switch, i-f notch filter, 
reference-derived calibrator signal, three age release 
times {plus AGC OFF), integral 1 50 MHz frequency 
counter/ digital readout for external use. and Receiver 
Incremental Tuning (RtT)* 



The 



wi 



• FREQUENCY FLEXIBIUTV. The TR7A/R7A combination 
offers the operator* particularly the DX'er or Contester. fre- 
quency control agility net available in any other sysi^m. The 
Twins^' offer the only system capable of no-compromise 
DSR (Dual Simultaneous Receive), Most transceivers allow 
some external receiver control, but the 'Twins" provide 
instant transfer of transmit frequency control to the R7A 
VFO. The operator can listen to either or both receiver's 
audio, and instantly determine his transmitting frequency by 



Iw" system 

appropriate use of the TR7A s RCT control (Receiver 
Controlled Transmit), DSR is implemented by mixing the two 
audio signals in the R7A 

• ALTERNATE ANTENNA CAPABiLTTV. The R7A s Antenna 
Power Splitter enhances the DSR feature by allowing the use 
of an additional antenna (ALTEBNATE) besides the MAIN 
antenna connected to the TR7A (the transmitting antenna). 
All possible splits between the two antennas and the two 
system receivers are possible. 




Specifications,- availability and pnces subject tD change without notice or obllpticin. 

See your Drake dealer or write 
for additional Information, 




COMING SOON: New RV75 Synthesized VFO 
Compatrbie with TR5 and 7'Llne Xcvrs/Rcvrs 

• Frequency Synthesized for crystal -controlled 
stabiltty * VHTQ (Variable Rate Tuning O5cillat0r*) 
adjusts tuning rate as function of tuning spee^t 

* Re^olutkin te 10 Hz • Ttiree programmable fix^ 
frequencies for MAPS. etc. • SfrtH or Transceive 
operation with masn transceiver PTO or RV75 



R. L. DRAKE COMPANY • 54a Richard Street. Miam^sburg, Ohio 45343 • P^one [51 3) 866-2421 • Telex 288-01 7 



Patent pending 



W2NSD/1 

NEVER SAY DIE 

eofitor/a/ by Wayne Green 





WHERE'S THE SOLDER? 

For years, the pride of my 
workbench was my 300*Watt 

soldering rron. I looked for it the 
01 her day, thinking I might 
frame it as a historic remnant 
of a long lost past, and eouldn*t 
find it. Well. ( don't need that 
old 300-Watter anymore any- 
way. These days, a simple pen- 
cil Iron is enough to do irrepara- 
ble damage. Some of these 
damned chips we use today 
would probably seifdestruct if 
just allowed in the room with 
the 300-Watt iron. But the fact 
is that though the toots have 
changed^ we're getting into an 



era of a high interest in building 
electronic gadgets. 

The recent emphasis on reta* 
tively simple building projects 
\n 73 has brought in quite a bit 
of congratulatory mail. It's ap- 
preciated. You know, when I 
started 75, back in 1960, one of 
the basic reasons I felt that the 
magazine was needed was to 
encourage hams to build more. 
As the editor, Td had one heli of 
d battle with the publisher of 
CO over this. He wanted month* 
ly columns, which were a lot 
cheaper to publish. Vd built the 
magazine up from a real loser 
to a big winner with construc- 
tion. . .and found myself fired. 
So I started 75andgot right at it 
with construction projects. 

Just to make sure that you 
know right off when you look at 
the table of contents on the 
cover, we'li put a soldering-iron 
logo by each project. Mind you, 
these are not gomg to be alt- 
band transceivers which could 
take you a year to build, Til still 



TECHNICAL EDITOR WANTED 

The search is on! We're looking for a knowledgeable ham to 
become Technical Editor of 73 Magazine, If you enjoy our 
small-Gonstruction-project format and can tell a good circuit 
from a bummer, then youYe a prrme candidate. 

Duties of the Tech Editor include checking the technical ac- 
curacy of articles, working with authors to get the best new 
manuscripts, making sure 73 publishes Nmely reviews of the 
latest ham gear, climbing the tower to repair the 20-meter 
beam, installing Wayne's new mobile rigs, etc. There is plenty 
of opportunity for fun, too. working contests from W2NSD, 
learning about microcomputers, mountainlopping from the 
drive-up peak just down the road. 

Furthermore, Peterborough just happens to t>e located in 
one of the most beautiful areas of the country. The quality of 
life rs superb. Sound interesting? If you are a non-smoker, 
we'd like to hear from you. Resumes should be sent to Jeff De- 
Tray, Wayne Green, Inc., Peterborough NH 03458. 



leave those for Ham Radio, if 
they stay afloat. 

While it may go without say- 
ing that Tm hoping you will 
write up any construction proj- 
ects you develop, let me make 
sure that there is no misunder- 
standing here. If you design 
something which might be of 
interest to the rest of 73 read- 
ers, I hope you'lt write it up. 
Type the article double-spaced, 
leave generous margins, get a 
friend with a good camera to 
take art-gallery-class photos of 
your gem. . .and let's have it. 

Sure, it's fun to operate. But 
I've never gotten so wrapped up 
in operating that 1 missed a 
meal. Now building. . .many is 
the time Tve started working on 
a project and found myself look- 
ing at the rising sun, having 
missed dinner, midnight snack, 
and all those usual buffering 
pick-me-ups in between. Hell, 
building something is more fun 
than coffee ice cream. 

And yes. you can go fairly far 
afield. Sure, weVe mostly inter- 
ested in amateur radio, but that 
won't stop us from publishing 
interesting projects which are 
involved with other aspects of 
life such as photography, com- 
puters, and so on. You'll get my 
attention the fastest with gad- 
gets which tie computers and 
amateur radio together- I Know 
as welt as you that we have the 
tools to make incredible 
changes in communications 
over the next few years. It's get- 
ting time for us to grab those 
tools and carve out some pio- 
neer territory with high-speed 
Morse. RTTY, or ASCII.,, or 
whatever pleases you. 

We have the parts to make In- 
credibly sophisticated repeat- 
ers... yet Tve seen iittle to 



amaze me so far. Let's get 
cracking. ., and writing, I'll 
publish. , ,and pay, 

CIRCUITS CmCUITS CIRCUITS 

Some years ago I began re- 
printing little circuits out of for- 
eign electronics magazines 
which I thought might interest 
the more dedicated experiment* 
er. They were presented with 
very little backup information 
. . Just enough for the experi- 
enced builder to put the project 
together and get it working. 
We're running that section 
again and would like to have you 
send in little circuits for almost 
anything. You don't have to put 
together a whole article — just 
the circuit, the parts values, and 
a hint of what it will do^ Perhaps 
you've found a circuit from 
some other (non-ham) magazine 
which readers might find of val< 
ue , . . or from a book. We' i i scan 
the foreign magazines and see 
what we can find for you. You 
don't have to draft the circuits. 
Just sketch them ciearly. show- 
ing all parts values. If there are 
any special parts, show what 
they are and where they can tie 
obtained. The address is Cir- 
cuits, Editorial Offices, 73 Mag- 
azme. Peterborough NH 03458, 
By the way, don't forget to in- 
clude your choice of book from 
the Radio Bookshop, which well 
send you when your circuit is 
published. 

For that matter^ authors of ar- 
ticles on construction projects 
should remember that 73 is read 
in over 200 countries and that in 
most of them parts are darned 
hard to come by. Thus, if there is 
any way to do it. try to use com- 
monly available pans... or at 
least suggest such as replace- 
ments if you've used a 1963 tran- 
sistor in your unit. A bulEder in 
Chile witi not be happy if you 
merely specify a Radio Shack 
part number. . .give a bit more 
in details since his Radio Shack 
may not carry the full line. 

One of the main reasons why 
73 is so treasured by DX hams is 
that it runs more construction 
projects than any other ham 
magazine in English in the 
world. We can't come close to 
the Japanese ham magazine, 
but then they have at>out three 
times as many active hams 
there as we do, so that's natural, 
if I could get someone to trans- 
fate the Japanese construction 
projects, I could put out a couple 



6 73 Magazine • November, 1982 



*AP*CW-, 



/s. /ai 



i-I .i 



£?6a^ 




F^-QOO 




^'Now hear this""... digital display, 
easy tuning 

The R-6Q0 is an ftfifordiiblj priced, high 
peifomunce general coverage conuntini ca- 
tions receiver cove ring 150 kHz to 30 MHx in 
30 bands. Use of PLL synthesized circnitTy 
provides majdnmm ease of operation. 

R'600 F1;ATUR£S: 

[ • 350 kHz to 30 MHz conllniious coverage, 
; AM. SSB. or CW. 

• 30 bands, each I MHz wide, for easier tuning. 

• Five digit frequency display, with 1 kHz 
resoludon. 

• 6 kHz IF niter Rir AM (wtdej, and 2.7 kHz 
niter for SSB. CW and AM (narrow). 

I • Up-con version PLL circuit, for improved 
I sensitivity* selectivity, and stabill^. 



• Communications type noise blanker eltmi- 
nat<?s "pulse- type* notse, 

• RF Attenuator allows 20 dB attenuation of 
strong signals. 

• Tone control. ■ Front mounted speaker. 

• "S" meter. %v^lth 1 ro 5 SINf^) "S" acale, plus 

standard stale. 

• Coaxial and wire antenna terminals. 

• lOO. 120. 220, and 240 VAC, 50/60 Hz. 

Selector switch on rear panel. 

• Optional 13.6 VDC operaLion. using DCK-1 
cable kit 

• Other features Include carrying handle. 
headphone jack, and record Jack. 

Optional accessories for R-SOO and R-IOOO: 

• DCK'l DC Cable kU, • SP400 External 
Speaker. 

• HS-6. HS-5. HS-4 Headphones. 
■ HC-10 Df0tal World Clock. 



R-ioao 

High performance^ easy tuning, 
digital dispiay 

The R-1000 high peifomianee conununica- 
tions receiver covers 200 kHz to 30 MHz 
in SO bands. An up-con version PLL 
synthesized circuit provides Improved 
sensitivity* selectivity, and stability. 

R-1000 FEATURES: 

^ Covers 200 kHz to 30 MHz. 

• 30 bands, eae:h 1 MH;^ wide, 

• Five-digit frequency display wlHi l-kl^ix 
resolution and analog dial with precise gear 
dial mechanism. 

• Hulk-In 12-hour quaruit digital clodc'tlmcn 

• RF step attenuator 

- Three IF filters for optimum AM. SSB, CW. 

• Effective noise blanker • Tone control. 

• Built-in 4 -inch speaker. » Dimmer switch. 

• Wire and coax antenna terminals. 

• Vohage selector for 100. 120. 220. and 240 
VAC Operates on 13.8 VDC with optional 
DCK'l kll. 





"Cents-ational"..JF 
shift, digitai display, 
narrow-wide filter switch 

The TS-530S SSB/CW 
transceiver covers 160-10 meters 
using the latest, most advanced 
circuit technology, yet at an 
affordable price* 

TS-530S FEATtmES: 

* 160-10 tneters. IJ5B. USB, CW, all 
amateur frequeticiesH Including 
new 10. 18, and 24 MHz bands. 
Receives WWV on 10 MHz, 

« Built-in digltal display (six digits, 
fluorescent tubcsl. with 
analog dial. 




IF shift tunes out Interfering 

signals. 

Na rro w/ wide HI t er se! ecio t 

switch for CW and/ or SSB. 

Built-in speech processor, for 

increased talk power, 

Wide receiver dynamic range, 

with greater immunity to 

over! o ad. 

Two 6146B's in final, allows 

220W PEP/^180 W DC input 

on all bands. 

Advanced single -con version 

PLL, for better stability, improved 

spurious chantcterl sties. 

Adjustable noise-blanker, with 
front panel threshold controL 



• RIT^XIT front panel ronlrol 
allows independent fine- tuning 
of receive or transmit 
frequencies. 

Optional accessories: 

• SP-230 exLernal speaker with 
selectable audio filters, 

• VFO-240 remote analog* VFO. 
■ VFO 230 remote digital VTO, 

• AT 230 antenna tuner/SWFl/ 
power meter. 

• MC'50 desk microphone 

• KB't deluxe VFO knob. 

• YK-S8C (500 H'/) or \'K 88CN 
(270 HzJ CW fiher. 

• YK-8SSN II .8 kHzl narrow 
SSB fiker 



The TS-660 "QUAD BANDER" 
covers 6, 10, 12* 15 meters. 

• FM. SSB fUSB), C^W. and AM 

• Dunl digital VFO's 

• Digital display 
■ IF shift bujlt-ln 

• 5 memories with memory* scan 

• UP/DOWN microphone 

• All mode squelch 

• Nolwe blanker 

• CW semi break-in/ side tone 

• lOW^on SSB. CW. FM; 
4 W on AM. 

Optional accessories: 

• PS- 20 power supply 

• VOX-4 speech pr«jcessor/VOX 

• SP-120 Externa! speaker 

• MIMOO Moliile mount 

• YKS&C, YK 88CN CW filters 
- YK^8A AM filter. 






KENXA/aOD 

TRIO-KENWOOD COMMUNICATIONS 
1111 West Wainul Compton. California 90220 



I 



STAFF 



FUBUSH EFVEDrrOA 
Warn* QfMH yWHSCVI 

EXECtrnve vrct president 

ASSISTANT PUiLlSHlR^EPITQR 

MANAOINQ EDITOn 
Jotin Bumell 

ASST MANAGIf^Q iDlTOR 

Susan Phlltjriuk 

EOtTDHIAL ASSISTANTS 

Nhucv Nayd 

HIchard PlwniK 

StBV« JSlHfllt 

TECHNICAL EOtTOR 

ASStSTAWT 
TDTMi PRESIDENT 

Malih€-fM Srriiiri, kaiiB 

ASSOOATES 

Robert Baher WB^FE 

JhD^h Eotwdf KI2M 

Bill Gosmsy KE7C 

S«iri{ier Grt«r» 

QndH»rt^sVP2ML 

Of. Matc Letver WASAJR 

J H^ Nelson 

Bill l^astmna^ WAQITF 

Peisr Stark K^OAW 



PRODUCTION MANAdERf 
PUSLICATIOMS 

N^rtcy SaJman 

A5ST, PflODUdTlON 

M AMAG£RJ PU B U€ATlO NS 

MiciiAfll Miirphif 

ADVEATISING GRAPHICS 
MANAGERS 

pffocwenoM 

Francffft B«n1on 
LJndb Dr«w 
Den»l t>y«r 
f^il GaracJ 

Scott PhiltKtck 
Dj^nne K Rhtii{)n 

Anne Bocohio 
Marv Sflevor 
Deborah Sforut 
Ther&ae Veruiiit 
Judi WLmberly 
David Wo?mjik 

PHOTOaRAPHY 
SaiKtra l>L>Htllfl 
Lwde Jcnnison 

Robert M. VlHmuv* 
TttoitBS ^iliafwiw* 

TTPfSfrnwc 

Sara Bedell 

>MpdyB«cMi 

Marti Buttar 

i^Mctieift Dftsflewrwr » 

iJ^nnifS'r Fiy 

ILynn Hgirtfrt 

Linda LirM^ht 

Debblfl NuTtIng 

Ellpn SchwartJt 

V^&mr) StQwarl 

GENERAL MANAGER 

Debra lA/Dinorb^o 

CQNTnOLLER 

Roger J. Mutvf^f 

ACCOUNTtNQ WANAGER 
Knud KeUer KV^GQl 

aflCULATlON MAMAQEM 

BULK SALES MAJiAOEft 
Gmiue Boudrfciu 

ADV01TI&1NG 

Jin:i<ka>< W1XU. Mgr. 

Nancy Ciampa, Ami Mgr, 

Roes Kenytitn KAIOAV 

Gornaita Tflyiof 



hondred pages a month of 
things for you to build. 

I*ve mentioned before that if 
you have a DX friend you can 
help him a lot by giving him a 
subscription to 73. The maga- 
zine gets positively worn out in 
most countries. A few years 
ago, when the dollar was weak, 
they had no problem getting the 
magazine, but today It's almost 
prohibitive in many countries. 
Of course, behind the Iron Cur* 
tain they are not permitted to 
send money for magazine sub- 
scriptions, so they have to de- 
pend entirely on the friendship 
of fellow hams who are more for- 
tunate in where they five, 

CQ FAILS CODE TEST! 

One of our readers in New 
Mexico sent in an envelope he 
received from our friends at 
CQ^ On the cover is a bunch of 
Morse code. The reader trans- 
lated the code for us, chuckling 

Continued on page 140 




QSL OF THE MONTH: AG5X 

Tfifs month's winning QSL Is from Bob Jackson AG5X of Webster 
TX. Bob has a stunningly simple ultra-modem QSL design. The call- 
sign is presented visually around the upper left-hand perimeter of 
the card. The callsign is dispiayed in modern type in the lower fight- 
hand space balancing the image and contributing to the overall 
pleasing effect of the card. 

To enter 73 Magazine's QSL of the Month Contest send your QSL 
in an envelope to; Editorial Offices, 73 Magazine, Peterborough NH 
03458, Specify a book from 73's Radio Bookshop (located elsewhere 
in this magazine). Entries which are not in an envelope or do not se- 
lect a book will not be considered. 



Well ... I Can Dream, Can't I? 



by Bandel Linn K4PP 







Uif 



I'm the guy you were talking to on 2 meters! Please follow me to our yacht 
landing for dinner!" 



B 73 Magazine • November, 1982 






Three Choices— Three Great Radios 



IC-720A 

Usien to signals from 
arnund the world 
Willi a 100 Km — 
30 MHz nccci^Tcr. 
Talk %%ith a 160 — 
10 mtrier transceiver 
— rcadv to gfi 
V£ ARC ?9 bands, 
dual VFO's — split 
ope nit! on. ICOM's 
Dl'M (Direct Peed 
Mixtrl psiitsbiind 



ir 




tuning, speech 
compresMsn 100 
wans. SSH. C^\ AM, 
R IT\ ( I>»K ). 
computer 
compatible tuning, 
12 \t3lt operation, all 
features standard 
except C\S & AM 
ifiiu^row filters. [COM 
system' accessories 
are a\^ilahle for a 
complete station. 




WHIPS 



Cut portable/ mi>bile 
with ICOM's small 
HF, fCOM system' 
tible. lUOdB 



amic range. 

+ iy.5dBni iniercc 

point receiver y 

utilizing ICOM Y 
ni M. SSB, CW./AM, 

dual VFO's— ^ ■ 
4iji4:r4ALiua«d 
mem on per band. 
C^V SSB fifcr 



opuons, luu watts, 
12 volt operation, 







*iCOM system, im sumr rUrr^Hin*^ wrrk nfth alt ttrve itF 
tnmaittvws'^ — K Jkt. nutotMitutau-HiHn^ hTtuaJfutmhti htietir 
iitnfftijivr. A/ "it iff trAfffff miUtthitHl'tiiihbittfi. ttulotiitthtg tmU'ttfM 
iNm'n. f(f*\/^ fkntvf sii0)i}\ H< tHA fUL'trntn- fniikttiif, tf..SF.i vxtt*nkii 




I 



ICOM 



9^5 



iCOMMierica Inc. 21 12-1 16ih Ave NE. Del 



OODfOximQ» 



WA 96004 (206 H54'^1 55/3331 Towfv«*^ 

iect to ^^1Q^ge wimout notice or obfagoflOrt m KOm lokof sgniftronily »M:c*«f FCC regutotwsna finniiriQ s^xnot* aiAporw. 



subfecrio 



MiJte Strange WA2BH6 
FOBa%58 

Pine Htil Nl QB021 



A Perfect "10 



ff 



Timer, counter, logic probe— 10 functions in all. That's the 

Multi-Board One, and you can build it 



Ed. Note: WA2BHB*s drticle was one of the hoaorabts mention winners in our Home* Brew Contest. Mil^e will be receiving a $50 bonus in ad* 
tion to his normal article payment 



I 



The Multi-Board One 
(MB-1) started out as a 
circuit to give a courtesy 
beep indicating time-out re- 
set on my repeater A quick 
prototype showed that with 
a few extra components, the 
circuit could be a handy 
gadget to have in the shack, 
too. Being a home*brew nut, 



Tm always needing an extra 
gated signal source, another 
trigger, an oscillator, or just 
one more logic level indica- 
tor, etc. I always seem to be 
one short of whatever it is I 
need to prototype a new de- 
sign. Well, the MB-1 was the 
answer to my problems It 
satisfied the two basic re- 



quirements to be an addi- 
tion to my bench: It was 
cheap, and it did more than 
one thing (10 in fact!). 

The MB-1 as designed is 
all on one 1 'A " X 2 Vi *" print- 
ed circuit board and can 
perform the following func- 
tions: 




An assembled MB-1. A complete kit of all parts and 3 CIO reftow soldered printed circuit 
board is available for $12 postpaid frorn W-S Engineering Corp., PO Box 58, Pine Hill N} 
08021; telept\one(201)-8524)269. 

10 73MBgazm& * Novem tier, 1982 



with 



• Variable signal generator 
up to 500 kHz 

• Adjuslabte positive 
gated astable oscillator 

• Adjustable negative 
gated astable oscillator 

• Adjustable positive 
gated monostable 

• Adjustable negative 
gated monostable 

• Adjustable timer 
normally off output 

• Adjustable timer 
normally on output 

• TTL'CMOS logic probe, 
with audible and LED out- 
put indicators 

• Pulse stretcher 

• Repeater beeper 

Fig 1 shows the schemat- 
ic, !t is simple and easy to 
build. The photo shows a 
completed unit. Fig. 2 shows 
the connection/jumper as- 
signments needed to create 
any of the various MB-1 
functions. See Fig. 3 for 
component layout with 
jumper hole assignments 
labeled with letters 

All adjustments for oscil- 
lator frequency, pulse 
length, and output level are 
on the printed circuit board, 
You may want to replace the 
board-mounted trim pots 



with multiturn panel-mount- 
ed units and the tiining ca- 
pacitor can be mounted 
with additional capacitors 
on a rotary wafer switch so 
you can have several ranges 
available. The variations are 
endless and, for a few dol- 
lars, you can create a lot of 
useful test gear for the 
shack. 

Theory of Operation 

The Multi-Board One uses 

a basic RC oscillator with an 
enable signal being provid- 
ed by a 555 timer setup in 
various trigger modes, One 
half of a 4011 quad NAND 
gate is set up with a positive 
enable input at pin 1 driven 
by the output of the 555 



9 




CD40tlB£ 



J^ ^^ 1^^ V-° 



5 I * — ^^^ 



] : fcOK a UP 



•^h 



IK 




cra 



asc. 



ICk;^- OA OUTPUT 



timer The output of pin 3 of 
the 555 timer is normally 
low, so the 4011 oscillator is 
off. When pin 3 goes high, 
the osciflator turns on. Pin 2 
of the 555 IS the trigger in- 
put. When a negative-going 
pulse causes the voltage at 



Fig. 1. MB-1 schematic. 

this point to drop to below 
one-third of Vcc, the output 
of the 555 (pin 3) goes high 
and the 4011 oscillator turns 
on. If pin 2 of the 555 is held 
low [grounded), the oscilla- 
tor acts as a generator. 
The puhe length potent i- 



ometer controls the dura- 
tion of the high output of 
the 555 (pin 3, point F). Any- 
thing 10k Ohms or greater 
can be used. The larger the 
value of this potentiometer 
and the larger the value of 
CI, the longer the "on" dura- 



Function 


Input 


Output 


1. Slgnaf 


L None 


1. Point A 


Generator 




Ac signal. 
wHI drive 



Interconnections 

1. Point F jumpered to 
ground 



2. Beeper and 
Positpve Gated 
Astable 

3. Beeper and 
Negative Gated 
Astable 

4. Positive 
Trigger 
Monostabfe 



Z Point C through 
22k resistor 

3, Point D wfth a 

negative-going 
pulse 

4. Same as #2 



B-Ohms & up 

2, Point A 
Putse of 3c 

3, Point A 
Pulse of ac 

4, Point G 
Dc pulse 



2, Jumper point E to F 



3, None 



4. Same as #2 



5. 


Negative 

Trigger 

Monostable 


5. Same as #3 


5, Same as #4 


5. 


None 


6. 


Audible CMOS 


6. Tie points 


6. Point A 


6. 


Point 10 to F 




Logic Probe 


S & 9 together. 


Ac signal 




Connect point B to 




(See Note #1) 


Put a 100k re- 
sistor from 8 
& 9 to ground. 
Points 8 & 9 are 
now the Input* 


to speaker 




power source of 
CMOS circuit being 
checked. 


7. 


CMOS Logrc 
Probe with 
LED output 


7. Same as #6 


7. Same as #6 
lor audio. 
For LEO, positive 
LED leg to point G 
other leg through 
1k to ground 


7. 


Same as #6 


8. 


CMOS Logic 
Probe with 
PuJse Stretcher 
{See Note #2) 


a Same as #6 


8. Same as #6 or 
#7 as desired 


8. 


Same as #6 


9. 


Reverse Logic 


9. Same as #6 


9. Same as #6 


9. 


Point 10 to points 




for #6,7,8 


or #7 
potentiometer to minimum so there is no delay. 




12 & 13. Point 11 to F, 


Note#1; Set duration 


Note #2: Set duration 


potentiometer to position 


of desired "pulse stretch" 


length. 




Ail 


instructions assume ground and power connections are correct. 







Fig. 2. Hookup connection function chart 



73 Magazine • November, 1982 11 



il 



I 






— 3h- 



tn 



-^H 



&5S 



i 




2^22224 





Z 10 


e 








• 









-1^ il io oi-L 

?-j -'ftj 7!!; > ^ 






OUTPUT 

i 



IK 



Fig. J. MB'1 PCS layQut component side. 




fig. 4. MB- J PCS layout foU view. 



tion. Timing can be set from 
milliseconds to hours. Note 
that CI must be a high- 
grade, very -low-leak age 
electrolytic capacitor 
Cheap or surplus capacitors 
have far too much leakage, 
and the circuit will not work 
with them 

The frequency of oscilla- 
tion is controlled by the po- 
tentiometer labeled OSC. 
This potentiometer can be 
from several Ohms to meg- 
ohms. The higher the value, 
the lower the frequency of 
oscillation. The output fre- 
quency is determined by the 
05-uF capacitor and ROSC, 
You can get this circuit to 
work up into the megahertz 



range, but above 500 kHz, 
stability becomes a problem 
for ^Lich a simple circuit. 

A buffered input is avail- 
able by using the 2N2222A. 
It also acts as an inverter. 

The output level from the 
circuit for the aslable and 
oscillator modes is con- 
trolled by the lOkOhm OLft- 
put potentiometer. As de- 
signed, the circuit will drive 
an 8-Ohm or greater speak- 
er In a reasonably quiet 
room, you can hear the au- 
dio output quite well. 

Construction 

Building of the circuit is 
very easy if you use the 
printed circuit board ap- 



a) 



p 



JUMPER TO OROUNQ 



STD 

9V 

BATTERt 



I 



da- 



aKD 



QND 



F^ 



fl-ffi OHM 
SPEAKER 




C'..IP TQ OC POUrEfi 
OF CiRCUn UttDE^ 
TEST 



c) 



'T 



5-i-ev .=_ 



I 



'Dl F 






**- 



Ck-tP T13 GUD OF CmCUlT 



NEGATIVE &OING PWSC mom 
CAIiniEf^ DROP IMOICATOI^ 



4U0IO "'BEEP" TO fiUOlO 

OUTPUT OF REPEATER 



Fig. 5. Sample applications, (a) Hookup for audio signal gen- 
erator (function #TJ. (b) CMOS logic probe with LED indicator 
(function §71 (c) Repeater beeper lindicates timeout reset) 
with negative pulse trigger (function #ij, 

12 73 Magazine • November J 982 



proach. Fig. 3 shows the pic- 
torial layout of the PCB. Fig 
4 is a foil view of the actual 
printed circuit layout, Parts 
are not critical, but if you 
use cheap parts, the circuit 
performance is significantly 
degraded. Since this circuit 
is so small, it pays to use 
first<lass prime parts 

Checkout and Setup 

The fastest way to verify 
that your MB-1 works is to 
configure it as a generator 
Hook up the board as per 
Fig 2, function 1 Fig, 5 
shows sample physical con- 
figurations, so you can 
make sure you have every- 
thing correct Set R-OSC at 
mid-range and ROUTPUT 
for maximum audio. After 
you apply Vcc, you will hear 
a tone from the speaker. If 
no output, vary the ROSC 
and ROUTPUT settings If 
you still don't hear anything, 
start checking for bad ICs. 
incorrect wiring, solder 
shorts, etc 

Applications for the MB-1 

I have found the MB-1 to 
be the most useful and 
cheapest little circuit I've 
designed, I have one in two 
different testers acting as 



simulated microphones. An- 
other is used as a CMOS 
spare logic probe. 1 particu- 
larly like the audible feature 
so I can hook it to one part 
of a circuit and not have to 
look at it to know what is go- 
ing on. And yet another is 
being used as a basic 
4554cHz signal generator for 
rough appHcalions. And last 
but not least, one is the origi- 
nal ''beeper" for my Porta- 
Peater repeater. 

You will probably think of 
more applications for this 
circuit after you have made 
a few. Figs. 2 and 5 should 
get you up and running Af- 
ter you have put a few of 
these modules to work, 
you'll probably wonder how 
you got along without them! 

I'm more than happy to 
answer any questions or pro- 
vide any application assis- 
tance you may need. How- 
ever, please provide an 
SASt. This greatly speeds up 
the answer process and 
keeps me from destroying 
the household budget. 

W-S Engineering has a 
complete kit of all parts in- 
cluding a PCB for $12.00 
postpaid in the U.S.A. (W-S 
tngineering, PO Box 58, 
Pine Hill NJ 08021 ).■ 



Parts List 




Bare PCB 


8-pin Dip socket 


NE555 IC 


2N2222A transistor 


CD4011BE IC 


47-uF, 16 V dc capacitor 


10k trlmpot (Panasonic Q0A14) 


22k, V4'W resistor 


2 500k trimpots <Panasonic O0A66) 


2 2.2k, V-'W resistors 


„01-uF bypass capacitor, 50 V dc 


470k, V4-W resistor 


JO^uF capacitor, 50 V dc (2) 


Ik resistor 


.047 metallized polyester capacitor 


100k, v*-W resistor 


16-pin DIP socket 


T1 ¥4 Red LED 




MO 



mB0D^f^^ 



MAX. MECHAMCAL INTEGRHY, 
ELECTRICAL PERFORMANCE, 
SPACE SAVINGS AND SELECTION 




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F}«rng.va 
Bolt» 



and Till 




MECHANICALLY Hy-Gainmonobandantennas 
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are unique Stainless steel hardware \% chemi- 
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parts are deburred and finished so you don t 
have to re-manufacture the antenna before in- 
statlation, It all adds up to antennas with maxi- 
mum mechanical integrity that withstand 80 mph 
{129 km/h) windloads and radial ice^ 



£LECTRICAL performance la not based on 
theoretFcal calculations alone but is tuned and 
tested for optimum results on our Qovernment 
approved test range Hy-Gain's factory tuned 
52 ohm Beta Match is exclusive and assures 
positive dc ground for lightning protection and 
reduced precipitation static Though sometimes 
uficonventionat. our meticulous element 
spacing assures maximum F/B ratfo and un- 
compromismg power gain, VSWR at resonance 
is less than 1 5:1 Alt Hy-Gain monobanders 
handte maximum iegal power with a 4:1 safety 
margin In short, electrical performance is at 
maximum by design and requires no re-tuning- 



IT 



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SPACE problems are vinuatly eliminated Even our largest mono- 
band antennas fit most residential tors And thanks to Hy-Gains 
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TELEX COMMUNICATIONS. INC. 

960DAJcft-icinAve Sa lnt aiipo>n. tflTl "ilim 1 1 "T A 

Le Borafsaru-Office 71t. Cv^re Affann f%«-Niartl. 93153 Le Banc-Mesffel, France 



-^See Us^t of Advertisers qh pege 130 



73 Magazine • November, 1982 13 



Remote-Control Your IC-701 

Simpler than commercial controllers, this home-brew unit 
nevertheless features push-button band changing and frequency 

selection, scanning, and expanded coverage. 



Ctenn Williman N2CW 
612 Auth Avenue 
Ocean Ni 07711 



Soon after purchasing my 
701, 1 became inter- 
ested in exploring the 
remote-control capabilities 




front v/ew. 




of the radio. I was not will- 
ing to spend the money for 
the manufacturer's unit, 
but I also did not need 
many of the built-in fea- 
tures obviously intended 
for use with their compan- 
ion 2-meter set, the IC-211. 
Some cautious e^^periment- 
ing with the accessory con- 
nector on the rear panel led 
to the design of this rela- 
tively simple control unit 
which can perform all the 
operations I feel are neces- 
sary for operation on the HF 
bands. Basically, this unit 
can perform the following 
functions: 

• push-button control of 
bandswitching 

• frequency selection 

• manual frequency scan- 
ning (fast or slow) 



• extension of frequency 
range of standard IC-701 

Theory of Operation 

In order to understand 
the operation of the re- 
mote-control unit, the re- 
quirements for controlling 
the IC-701 must first be ex- 
amined. 

The synthesizer in the 
IC'701 contains two preset- 
table up-down counters 
which control the program- 
mable divider in the phase- 
locked loop (PLL), one 
counter for each of the two 
vfo positions selectable on 
the front panel. The fre- 
quency data is encoded and 
read in serially, and in the 
normal mode of operation 
the data contains four char- 
acters, i e., after the serial 



12 KEYS 










1 
■ A^iHJfllFtED 

/acD cmiE 1 

lO SVflTHESdEJl 
^ VOLTACE 


• 

OEBOUtiCE 


WATflllF 
ENCODE 










t 
1 

\ 


1 










fiAND 
(liPUT 

6 KEYS 


DIGITAL 
SCAAI 
B 
LATCH 


VOLTAPE 
DIVIDER 










\ 

\ 


\ 

I 


? PROPORTlO^tA L 

TO BAND 






T UH 1 (*G 
a KEYS 






400. t 
rt-^CtLLATOR 








CLOCK 


yp-PB 

ectrmoL 













KETftOAHD 



SidB view. 

14 73Maga£ine • Novembef, 1902 



fig. 1. Block diagram. 



THE RTTY ANSWER 



. 4 

» - ~ 



TIMUSHOiO 




»l«i«l^ » 





NOW...300 Baud & Super-RATT 



for either iRL terminat unit 

dAH circuits on small module inside TU 
dNo changes to our outstanding filters 
DJust add one switch and the module 
o Factory installed or you can do it 



the most powerful RTTY program 
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O 65 pages of excellent documentation 

p Features galore 

D Available with or without custom cable 



and still the finest in RTTY 



the FSK-1000 Terminal Unit 

D Unparalfeled selectivity achieved with 

sophisticated true limiterless design 
n Ultra sharp active filters 
a Tuneable shift (80-1000 HzJ 
oSetectable bandwidths {100/55 Hz,) 
a Three mode autostart 
n Positive dynamic range indicator 
D Extruded aluminum enclosure 
□ Adjustable "mark hold" 
D Keyboard activated transmit 
o Optional AFSK keyer 
D Internal toop supply, RS232, £ TTL 



the FSK-500 Terminal Unit 

D Superior selectivity 

C Selectable bandwidths 

dAII standard shifts 

D 3 shift AFSK keyer included 

D Narrow shift I.D, included 

□ Preselector included for QRM supressJon 

p EconomicaHy priced 

D Fully wired and tested 

p Compact size 

D RS232 or TTL 

D Optional loop supply 



from iRL 700 Taylor Road Columbus, Ohio ^3230 (614) 86^-246^4 

Visa or Master Card accepted ^ Immediate delivery _ 

If you write RTTY computer programs, call us. We are looking for new ideas in software 



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a 



iW 



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404<9 






*Q49 
15 






12 



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tl9) 



lOK 



TO 70ll»Jtt# £ 20 2* 25 ?2 ^ tS '9 & 




f/g. 2, Remote-control ctfcuit 



data of the first four charac- 
ters is entered, any suc- 
ceeding data is ignored ur> 
til the counters are again 
cleared. 

Automatic bands witch- 
ing is accomplished by a 
stepping relay which is driv- 
en by a differential compar- 
ator A front-panel switch 
selectable tap on a voltage- 
divider chain is compared 
to a similar voltage-divider 
chain switched by the step- 
ping relay. When the two 
voltages are approximately 
equal, the relay is de-ener- 
gized. 

Therefore, two types of 
signals are required: a series 
of pulses to program the 
frequency of the synthesiz- 
er and an analog voltage 
proportional to the desired 
band. Fortunately, access 
to these signals (and many 
others) is provided at the 
accessory plug on the rear 



panel of the IC-701 . The fre- 
quency programming in- 
puts are always active and 
are terminated internally 
either by resistors to ground 
or within the PLL LSI unit. 
The analog voltage input 
for bandswitching becomes 
active only when the band- 
switch on the front panel of 
the IC-701 is placed in the 
external position. 

Circuit Description 

Knowing the types of sig- 
nals required and the fur- 
ther requirements which I 
imposed of using simple 
push-buttons and CMOS 
circuitry, the circuit shown 
in Fig 2 evolved A block 
diagram is shown in Fig 1 

The frequency informa- 
tion is keyed in by twelve 
SPST push-button switches 
which are effectively de- 
bounced and encoded with 
a diode matrix. 



As the switch is closed, in 
Fig, 3, the inverter is pulled 
to ground and any bounce 
is damped by the effect of 
the RC network. When the 
switch is opened, any 
bounce is again damped 
since as long as any of the 
damped or filtered bounce 
transients do not exceed 
Vcc/2p the switch is effec- 
tively debounced at the 
output of the inverter. For 
this circuit, 100k and .01 uF 
provided the necessary 
time constant for the 
switches used. 

The debounced switches 
for through 9 are then en- 
coded into a BCD code. The 
exception is the key. A 
separate line is used for the 
character, rather than 
representing it as the ab- 
sence of all other lines. This 
is presumably required 
since the PLL unit loads 



m 



{>^ 



TO btODE 



fig. i 



data serially one "digit" at a 
time with each keystroke. 
The C and E keys are con- 
trol signals. The C key 
clears the counters, and the 
bottom edge of the select- 
ed frequency band will be 
displayed. The E key resets 
the counters and must al- 
ways be used prior to enter- 
ing digit information. 

In order to achieve push- 
button control of the band- 
switching, a digital scan 
and latch circuit is used, A 
4001 RC oscillator running 
at about 4 kHz clocks a 
counter with decoded out- 
puts (in this case a 4017, 



16 73MagaimQ • November, 1982 



HAL Puts MORE Behind The Buttons 



72 or 36 

Character 

Unas 



45-1200 Baud RTTY 
MOO WPM Morse 



2 Page 
Display 



Code 



Black 
^ Half 

36 White ^ 

'*er Characters ^P"" 

/ Unshlft Y" 
Status f on Synchronous 

Indicator / Space Idle 

on Screen / (For Baudot) C'Dlddle"} 



Auto 
TXyRX 
Control 




Auto Alt 3 RTTY , 

Four internal "ari^Hold shifts 

RTTY Demodulators (H'flh or Low Tones) 

- High Tones (US Standard) LED Tuning Indicators 

• Low Tones (lARU Standard) p? 

• 202 Modem (1200/2200 HZ) •Plus* 

Ext. Scope Connections 



Aedio or 

RS232 

Data 



Transmit 

and Receive 

With RTTY Loop Devices 

Audio Monitor 
ut Audio For Either 

From iriput or Output 

verorlape Sgnals 

Internal Speaker 
Plus External Output 



Input Audio 

From 

Receiver or Tape 



T2100 System;^ 

• CT2100 Comnnunlcations Terminal 

• KB2100 Keyboard 

• Video Monitor 

« Printer {3Q0Bd Serial ASCII-MPI-SaG) 



RM2100 Rack Adapter 
MSG2100 2000 Character 
"Brag Tape" ROM 



24 Line Display 
2 Pages of 72 
Character Lines 



Cofnmunlcntions Tumiinjil 






CI^TOO 



9W ^ iiui m^ 



4 Pages of 36 
Character Lines 
Split Screen 
(with KB2100) 



CT2100 



hm 



f. 



ft 



■Jr 



9 " TV Monitor 



KB2100 





'a 

I 



vi-^Hii 



HAL COMMUNICATIONS CORP 
Box 365 

Urbana, Illinois 61801 
21 7-367-7373 



fueBon 

CASLf 

i 

2 

5 

6 
7 
S 

9 



12 
13 
14 



Z 

l€ 

17 

13 

21 

£2 

23 

24 

8 

20 

18 



100 K 



4 7K 



tOK 



4.7K 



■ — WA^ 



5.3K 



4016 



IBK 



4.7K 



'W- 



4.7K 



TT-u- 



40ie 




D 



u 



?0 



10 



15 



1^0 



4C 



ao 



■%/■ 



4017 



■^^^^" 



4 7tC 
X50 

4.7K 
5 SK 




t 



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TO SWI 



8 



4 



■^h 






■m- 



■*♦ 



■^ 



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■i*- 



— »- 



RIBBON 

C&&LE 

PLUG 



(OOK O" (TYPICALl 
I «VV-- )[ 

— ^f— 



4^ 



4049 



■^J— ^W^ 






il- 



4049 



7808 



O 






♦H 



-N- 



7805 







+5V TO KEYBOARD 
GND TO KEYBOARO 



Fig. 4(a). Control circu/fry component layout 




Fig, 4fb| Control circuitry PC board. 



IS 73Magazme • November, 1982 



since they were available). 
Assume the counter is 
stopped in state #1 , and the 
clock is inhibited by the 10k 

pull-up resistor Depressing 
any of the other five keys 
corresponding to states 2 
through 6 pulls down pin 8 
of the 4001, since outputs 2 
through 6 are low, and en- 
ables the clock. The count- 
er cycles until the high 
decoded output corre- 
sponds to the depressed 
key. Then the clock and 
counter are again stopped. 
Essentially what happens is 
that the selected output 
line of the counter is 
latched high by whichever 
key is momentarily pressed. 
This selected line also con- 
trols one of six bilateral 
switches (4016s). The input 
side of the bilateral switch 
is connected to a voltage 
divider whose voltage cor- 
responds to a particular 
band, and the outputs are 
all common and fed to the 
band select input of the 

7or 

Another 4001 RC oscilla- 
tor serves as the scan clock 
input to the 701 in order to 
clock the divider in the PLL 
unit which tunes the synthe- 
sizer up or down in frequen- 
cy. There are two inputs for 
this on the 701. Clocking 
one line wilt increment or 
decrement the synthesizer 
depending on an up or 
down signa[ on the other 
line. The RC oscillator is run 
at both a fast t500-Hz) and 
slow (10-Hz) rate so that 
fast and slow tuning can be 
accomplished. The H key 
tunes the 701 higher in fre- 
quency; the L key tunes 
lower in frequency, and the 
F key increases the tuning 
rate to a fast scan and must 
be depressed with an H or L 
key for fast tuning. 

Power for the remote 
control is obtained from the 
1.S-V-dc pin on the 701 ac* 
cessory plug and is then reg- 
ulated down to +8 V and 
+ 5 V for the different por- 
tions of the circuit The up- 
down counters (fast and 
slow) and the frequency 
preset logic are all standard 




1 








2 
















ISO 


80 


40 


Hill 

'Hi 




20 


15 


10 






"1^ 










D 


F 


U 











Fig. 5(a). KeYboard component layout 





9 O J O O 
8 Tl -r 




C 40 15 20 r D 

SO 160 10 y F 



i G 



987654 3E201C 



fig. 5(bl Keyboard PC board. 



CMOS in the 701 and run at 
+ 5 V dc. The bandswitch- 
Ing voltage dividers in the 
701 are fed with regulated 
+ fl V dc, so this must be 
duplicated in the remote- 
control unit. 

Construction 

Two printed circuit 
boards were designed for 
this project, although a 
small IC breadboard will 
work nicely. One is for the 
keyboard {3" X 4.5") and 
one is for the control cir* 
cuitry(675" X 4.5"). These 
are shown in Figs. 4(b) and 
5(b). The push-button 



switches mount directly on 
the printed circuit board. 
Parts placement is shown in 
Figs. 4(a) and 5(a), The 
boards mount in an LMB 
type MDC 752 modular 
console. Ribbon cable (12- 
conductor) is used to con- 
nect the remote control to 
the accessory plug for the 
[C-701. 

Operation 

The layout of the 
keyboard with the band- 
switching and tuning keys 
on the right side and fre- 
quency selection keys on 
the left side lends itself to 



easy operation. Typical 
usage of the remote control 
goes like this: 

1 . Change band using one 
of six band select keys, 

2. Enter particular fre- 
quency, e.g.. 21.320.0. by 
using the 12 frequency se- 
lect keys (sequence keyed 
in this example would be 
E3200) 

3. Tune up or down (fast 
or slow) using the 3 f requen* 
cy scanning keys (below 
band select keys). 

Changing from one band 
to another and moving 
from one end of the band to 
the other can be done con- 



73 Magazine • November, 1982 19 



NOT JUST ANOTHER 
REGULATED POWER SUPPLY! 

The MSrR4K« model 2001 voltage regulator 
module is ideal for making reliable power 
supplies in a jiffy. Use it to power your 
mobile rig, other fidSTMK® series modules 
or as a general purpose bench supply. 

► Component selection sets output 
voltage (33 to 400 V dc) and current 
capability (5 mA to 100 A). Over 
voltage protection and remote shutdown 
included. Uses no ic's, 

^ One evening assembly using 2 x 3.6 
inch pc board and comprehensive 
instructions supplied. 

Price: $10.80 



Price includes: gIass-epo*y, etched^ plated, driDed pc boand; 
crt5truction manual, postage in U.S.A. (Ohio resadente atld 
5% sales lax). 

Send SI. 00 for Illustrate milliV^ product caiakig and 
refund coupon. 



PROHAM Electronics Incorporated 

3Mh5D LAKELAND BLV]> EASTLAKE OH HMa^4 



siderably faster than by 

manuat tuning, and with no 
transmitter tuning, the 
capability for instant QSY 
becomes more realizable 

There are several in- 
teresting operating tricks 
which can also be ac- 
complished with the 
remote control. 

1. The RIT, once turned 
on, will not be defeated 
when tuning with the 
remote controL as it will 
with the manual tuning con- 
trol 

2. Pressing "E" and "T'si^ 
multaneously arid releasing 
the "E" first will add 1 MHz 
to the displayed frequency; 
however, the display will 
only change on 20 meters 
and the display will in- 
dicate IS^xxx.x. 

The following is a list of 
the expanded coverage that 
is available: 

IhOm -1.000.0 ID 2.999.9; 
HOfii-iOOOO to 4.999.9, 
MHz wilt not display "4"; 
40m- 7.000.0 to 7.999.9; 



20m -14 000 to 15 999 9; 
15m -21.0000 to 22.999.9, 
MHz will not display "22"; 
10m — no expanded cover- 
age. 

There are obviously 
other features that could be 
built into the remote con- 
trol. Memory would be a 
"nice-to-have'' addition and 
really not that hard to do 
although the sequential 
(serial) data input require- 
ment does complicate 
things somewhat. 1 don't 
miss additional memory, 
over the two in the 701 . but 
then again I didn't miss the 
rtMiigte control until I be- 
gan using it. The ability to 
instantly move to different 
frequencies around {he 
band is the most useful 
one for me and it has be- 
come an operating conve- 
nience I wouldn't be 
without. 

Keys for the keyboard 
and circuit boards are 
available. Please enclose 
an SA5E for details ■ 



SATELliTE rCLEVISfON ftCCEfVER 



EiECIftOniC 

Amnsout i 



kiirc«lTl> f«K.|Ft^(T 



^ ■■-.. 



puwn 



hw IMI" 




KITS 



The Electronic Rainbow Receiver consists of a receiver 
with an external down^converter that mounts at the 
antenna, feeds the voltage to the LNA through the coax 
cable. The 4GHz signal is down converted to 70 MHz 
and is fed through the RG59/U coax to the receiver. 



Rainbow Kits art supplieit with simple step by step in 
structions. All the circuits that you need expensive test 
equipment to do are pre wired and tested. All prmted 
circuit boards have the outMne of each part printed on 
them. 



RECEIVER FEATURES 

Built in RF modulator • Detent 
Tuning-!? to 42 GHz • Variable 
Audio-53 to 7.S MHz • Invert Video 
• Channel Scan • Voltage monitor- 
ing • Meter output • Remote Tuning 
SPECIFfCATIONS: 
Single Conversion Image Rejection 
Downconverter • Threshold 8 db 
CNR • IF Bandwidth 24MH2 • Out- 
put IV Audio and Video • IF Fre- 
quency 70MH2 • Video Bandwidth 
4.5MHz • Size 3V^"Hx8l/^^■Dxll¥4"W 



Complete Satellite TV Receiver 

KIT *1 — Contains: 

• Ma inboard • Tuning Board • Down- 
converter Board • Modulator Board 

• All parts needed to complete receiver 

• Down Converter built in case. 

• Cabinet, attractive black brushed ano- 
dized metal with silk screened front 
and back for a professional look 

• 70 MH2 Filter is pre-wired and tested. 

• Complete instruction #a||p am 
Manual. $473.1111 



auatantaea 



W« will flccapl telephone orders for Vtsa & Mdate^card 

No C.O'D. Order! 

TO ORDER CALL 317*291 7262 
1 u UKUth i^ALL 3Q042a-35OO 

Compleis hit weighs 10 lbs Please add sufiicienl postage 

62S4 la Pas Trail 
Indianapolis, Indiana 46258 



KIT *2 — Board Kit Containst 

• ft^ain Board • Tuning Board • Down- 
converter board • Modulator Board 

• Parts List, assembly and alignment 
manual 

• 4GHz local oscllfafor and 70MHz filter 
is pre-wired and tested. ^|9Q fill 



instruction manual. Contains printed 
circuit board layouts, parts placement, 
and alignment instructions. &nc AA 



ELECTROniC 



RflinBOUJ 



fl ^1*6 



20 73Magaiine • November. 1982 




The 



POLAR RESEARCH'S 

Multi-Directional, Motor Driven Antenno Mounting 
Systems For Discriminattng Radio Operators I 




(AhTTENNAS NOT INCLUDED) 



Never before has an antenna nnounting system been available to radio operators 
v/ith the advantages and features of Polar Research's Li'l Slipper, The tremendous ver- 
satility and widespread applicatfons of the Lr'l Slipper system eliminate any cumbersome, 
awkward, inefficient and inaccessible antenna configurations due to the old normal 
single mast, vertical antenna stacking. Greatly reducing tower interference to the radia- 
tion pattern of the antenna, the Li'l Slipper's design effectively distributes wind-load 
evenly on the tower's structure while maintaining all antennas in a true perpendicular 
position, tangent at any point to the rotor's arc. 

Exclusive Li'l Slipper features include a high torque geared drive motor; all electric, 

end-of-rotation circuitry; acceptance of masts up to 2" O.D. on all four housings; and 

limitless applications with VHF, Split-Boom, H,F, Beams, Quads, TV/FM antennas, and 

even UHF Dishes and Corner Reflectors, 

^ ^ *^ INTRODUCTORY PRICE - $399.95 PLUS SHIPPING 

(Visa and Mastercard Accepted) 

Call Toll Free 7-800-328-2047 




U.S. AND FOREJGM PATENTS PENDING 



.^176 



^'^'^HS.^Vll^''^ 



Polar Research, Inc. 

P O Box 781 

Thief River Falls, MN 56701; Phone (218) 681-7413 



DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED 



Automatic Beam Aimer 



Here's the scoop on adding set-and-forget convenience to your 
rotator control. Works with nnost connmon control boxes. 



Cuy Slsughief K9AZC 
7S3 W. EHzabeth Dmv 
Crown Point iN 46.M)7 

I have a smart knob in my 
shack. It looks like any 
other dumb old pointer 
knob sticking out of a black 
box, but it's really quite 
clever. Turn it to a given 
beam heading, and it makes 
the Cushcraft tribander 
atop the tower outside my 
house rotate to that same 
direction and stop there, all 
by itself. 

I built its prototype origi- 
nally for my sightless 
friend, W9PBS, who until 
then had a problem know- 
ing which way his four^ele- 
ment monobander was 
aimed The voltmeter nee- 
dle on his Ham IV rotator 
control that usually reads 
out the direction his beam 
is painting is worthless to 
him, of course. It was while 
mulling over the problem 
of converting that analog 
needle's silent message into 
something more useful that 
I came up with the idea for 
the smart knob. And I liked 
it so wet! while debugying it 
and burning it in on mv o\vn 
operating table that I had to 
build one for myself. 



That's because my own 
DC^5 rotator control, 
identical with the Ham 
IV's and the control for the 
CDE's big antenna whirler, 
the Tail twister, requires 
holding down both a brake 
release and a direction 
button while the beam is 
swinging from one com- 
pass point to another. This 
can take as much as half a 
minute for a 180-degree di- 
rection change. The smart 
knob, on the other hand, 
requires only a quick twirl 
to the desired beam head- 
ing and it does the rest it- 
self, bringing the antenna 
around to the target while 
I tweak my transceiver tun- 
ing to peak that rare call 
up out of the mud and pre- 
pare to enter it in my log. 

If you have a CDE rota- 
tor, I think you'd enjoy a 
smart knob, too. Mine's 
been in use for many 
months now without ever 
rebelling at its task. So has 
the one in daily use by 
W9PBS, who actually 
switches it between two 
separate Ham IVs, driving 
15* and 20-meter mono- 
banders mounted on sepa- 
rate towers. 



The knob itself is fas- 
tened to the shaft of 
a 25k pot extending from 
a black box which, along 
with all the other parts and 
pieces inside except those 
scrounged from my junk 
collection, was bought at 
my neighborhood Radio 
Shack, for a total of less 
than S50. The heart of the 
gadgetry inside the box is 
that pot and a 12-voll-dc 
power supply capable of 
providing 1 50 mA or so [see 
Fig. 1 ), The supply feeds two 
sections of an LM339 quad 
comparator chip, three 
2N3904 transistors, and 
three 12-volt relays with 
DPDT contacts rated at 
three Amps. [See Radio 
Shack numbers in the Parts 
List ) But before we get into 
their functions, let's discuss 
the CDE rotator control 
system. 

It is a conventional low- 
voltage ac capacitor-start 
motor whose direction of 
rotation depends on which 
half of its winding pair is en- 
ergized. Though the light- 
duty CD-45, the medium- 
duty Ham IV, and the 
heavy <Juty Tail twister rota- 
tors have different braking 
systems and varying num- 



bers of ball bearings in their 
innards, they are similar 
electrically and their con* 
trol boxes are identical. 
Each contains the motor- 
feed transformer, the start 
capacitor, three push-and- 
hold button switches for 
brake release and direction- 
al control, and the direc- 
tion-indicating circuitry. 
That circuitry consists of a 
power supply which pro- 
vides 13 volts dc, a voltme- 
ter to read it. and a calibra- 
tion pot. 

Inside the motor housing 
there is a variable resistor 
shunted across the floating- 
ground, 13-volt supply (and 
connected to it by rotor ca- 
ble terminal posts 3 and 4 
on the back panel of the 
control box). The movable 
arm of that remote resistor, 
mechanically linked to the 
motor rotor, is chassis- 
ground, cabled to terminal 
post 1 on the control unit. 

The resistor is tied into 
the direction-indicating 
voltmeter circuit so that the 
meter reads full scale— 13 
volts — when the rotor is 
fully clockwise, zero volts 
at full counterclockwise, 
and 6V2 volts at the halfway 



22 73 Magazine • Novernber, 1982 



point. The voltmeter face is 
calibrated accordingfv* 

north at half scale, south at 
full clockwise and full 
counterclockwise, with the 
other points of the compass 

in between. 

And that's where the 
smart knob comes in. If we 
connect the outside termi- 
nals of its 25k pot across 
binding fK3Sts 3 and 7 on the 
rear apron of the control 
box (shunting the rotor-feed 
wires already there), I he pot 
will be in parallel with the 
1 3-voIt. direction-indicator 
supply, and the pot's center 
terminal will show a volt- 
age to ground proportional 
to the difference in relative 
settings of the pot and the 
rotor-mounted resistor. 

With the rotor turned 
due north so that 6V2 volts 
appears on the voltmeter, 
turning the smart knob's 
pot to half rotation — map 
north as indicated by the 
pointer knob, straight up — 
will bring to zero the volt- 
age between its center ter- 
minal and chassis ground, 
Now rotate the pot clock- 
wise, and that zero voltage 
will climb toward plus 6V2, 
depending upon the degree 
of rotation. Turn it counter- 
clockwise, and the voltage 
will fail back to zero at the 
midsetting, then begin a 
negative climb to -bVj 
when it's at full counter- 
clockwise. 

That's the secret of the 
smart knob's intelligence. 
Alt we need to do now is 
harness this intelligence to 

control the rotor motor and 
braking circuit so that our 
beam points wherever the 
knob tells it to. 

Fig 1 shows how the cen- 
ter terminal of the 25k Irn- 
ear-taper pot feeds two sec- 
tions of the comparator 
chip so that one senses posi- 
tive voltages, the other neg- 
ative. Because each turns 
on a switching transistor 
whose collector current 
flows through relay coils, 
one or the other relay is 
pulled in whenever there is 
a difference in rotation an- 



TERM !N/kL STRIP 
ON REAR OF CDE 
CONTROL SOK 




TO afiAKE RELEASE CONTACTS 
* IN CDE CONTROL SOW 



K|, CLOCK *'SE HELAY 

«?. COUNTER CLOCK* ISt RELAt 

K J, fif^AKf ft tLATf 



Fig. 1. Rotator control ^chemntic. 



gle between the smart knob 
and the beam rotor. 

The relay contacts paral- 
lei the push-button 
switches of the rotor con- 
trol box, thus energizing 
the brake and rotor motor, 
which swings the antenna 
to the direction called for 
by the smart knob; then the 
contacts open to hold it 
there They are so intercon- 
nected that even a compo- 
nent failure or human error 
cannot trigger simultane- 
ous clockwise and counter- 
clockwise rotation. And 
there is a time-delay circuit 
in the brake-release relay's 
switching-transistor circuit- 
ry ensuring that the rotor — 
and the heavy load it car- 
ries—coasts to a stop be- 
fore the brake is reapplied, 
thus averting the tower- 
twisting, rotor-ruining 
torque that the inertia of a 
suddenly-braked antenna 
can exert 

The component values 
shown provide a variable 
braking delay of about two 
to five seconds, adequate 
for my tribander and the 
heavier four-element mono- 
banders used by W9PRS. 

There is one smalt limita- 
tion. Because the voltage 
signalling the counterclock* 
wise comparator to turn on 
its switching transistor falls 
to zero when antenna rota- 



Parts List 

1 cabinet (270-453) 

1 transformer, 12 V, 300 mA (273-1385) 

3 relays, 12 V, DPDT (276-206) 

1 on-off switch (275-612) 

1 package (2) zener diodes, 6 V (276-571J 

1 25k pot, linear taper (271-1715) 

2 100k minipots (271-220) 

1 package (15) 2 N 3904 transistors (276-1603) 
1 quad comparator LM339 (276-1712) 

1 14 pin dip socket (276-1999) 

2 I.OOO'fjF elect roiytics (272^957) 
1 47-|iF electrolytic (272-1027) 

1 22'fjF electrolytic (272-1026) 
1 3'Amp rectifier diode (276-1 143) 
1 PC board, 4 Va " x 6 '^ (276-1 394) 
1 package push-In terminals (270-1394) 

1 package (50) diodes (276-1620) 

3 10k, V4'Watt fixed resistors 

2 lOQk, V^-Watt fixed fesistors 
2 1 meg, V4*Watt fixed resistors 

4 Ik, V4-Watt fixed resistors 

1 length, (two, three feet) eight-conductor cable* 
1 knob, pointer, junkbox type 

'If you've got a rotator, you must have some cable some- 
where, probably hanging in the garage. My Radio Shack 
doesn't stock it. The other parts wlH add up to around $45, '\f 
you buy them all new. Happy knobbing. 



tion approaches full coun- 
terclockwise south, and be- 
cause even a smart knob re- 
quires a small fraction of a 
volt to sense, counterctock- 
wise rotation will stop 
about 5 degrees from due 
south. But that's no big 
deaL Most beams have 
60-degree lobes; you still 
can nudge the antenna the 
rest of the way with the 
manual push-buttons, or 

73 



you can tell the smart knob 
to go full south clockwise 

where it has lots of voltage 
to sense. And it wilL 

There are no particular 
construction hints to pass 
along. Everything is dc and, 
therefore, lead lengths and 
dress are not a problem, I 
used perf board and wired 
point-to-point because I'm 
not into printed-circuit fab- 
rication. On one of the 

Magazine • November, 1962 23 







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smart knobs that 1 built, I 
used an eight-t(?rmirra! bar- 
rier strip to wire it to the 
CDE control box, and on 
others I chassis-mounted 
six<ontact female sockets 
so they could be unplugged 
from the rotor control box 
for testing and fiddling. 

However you wire yours 
to the CDE control, there is 
a small bit of surgery re- 
quired: You need to shunt a 
two<:onductor cable across 
the brake-switch contacts 
inside the CDt control box 
and bring it out to the smart 
knob box There is plenty of 
room to work inside the ro- 
tor control, and the plastic 
cabinet can be flexed 
enough to pass the cable 
between it and the chassis if 
you don't want to drill it for 
a connector socket 

If you use a plug and 
socket for this, be sure the 
brake contacts are connect- 
ed to the female half of the 
connector, because the 
brake wires are hot with 1 20 
V ac. 



With the smart knob 
built and connected to the 
CDE control box, discon- 
nect the brake^nergizing 
cable so that the antenna 
won't be swinging back and 
forth as you adjust the pick- 
up-dropout points of the 
switching transistors by 
tweaking the lOQk minipot 
feeding pin 4 ot the com- 
parator chip. Once you 
have that minipot properly 
set so that the device nei- 
ther hunts for a null nor 
fails to respond to a 3-to-5- 
degree rotation of the smart 
knob, you can loosen the 
pointer-knob set screw on 
the 25k pot shaft to line it 
up at due north when the 
antenna is pointing due 
north. 

Having thus compensat- 
ed for any discrepancy be- 
tween zero voltage at the 
put's wiping contact and its 
precise half-resistance set- 
ting, you will find calibra- 
tion is remarkably accurate 
at all points of the 
compass B 




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24 73 Magazine • November, 1982 



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73Magazfne * November, 1982 25 



//m Weir WBS&Ht 
Rsdio Systems Technology 
10985 Crass VaUby Avenue 
Grass Valley €A 95945 



Life-Support System for HTs 

At home or in the car, this do-it-yourself charger and accessory 
box could be the best friend your handie-talkie ever had. 



For the first couple of 
weeks after you buy 
your 2-meter handie-talkie 
"brick" CTempo, I com, Yae- 
su, etc.), it is sort of fun to 
plug and unplug the unreg- 
ulated charger so that the 
nicad battery pack stays at 
full charge. After that, 
though, the newness wears 
off and it is just a pain in the 
lower backside to try to 
guess at how long you 
ought to leave the juice on 
before you boil the cells 
dry. Not only that, but you 



are never really sure wheth- 
er you have given the bat- 
tery pack full charge or 
whether you are consistent* 
ly undercharging the nicad 
pack, a notorious cause of 
nicad deterioration. 

In addition, it would be 
sort of nice to be able to 
operate mobile with your 
brick and use the same mo- 
bile speaker and micro- 
phone that you use for all 
your other mobile equip- 
ment plus the mobile's bat- 



tery-generator charging sys- 
tem. The brick box de- 
scribed here will solve these 
problems and perform the 
following functions: 

1) Regulates the voltage 
and limits the current from 
the factory-supplied wall 
charger so that the nicad 
batteries in the brick may 
be left on charge for as long 
as you like without over- 
charging. 

2) Allows the car (or boat, or 



snowmobile, or aircraft) 
battery-charging system 
also to charge the brick bat- 
teries with a regulated, 
current-limited circuit. 

3) Permits you to plug in a 
mobile microphone and 
provides an amplifier- 
matching circuit between 
microphone and brick that 
is adjustable for exactly the 
right amount of deviation. 

4) Allows the speaker ampli- 
fier in the brick to drive an 





The compteted brkk box, 

26 73 Magazine • November, 1982 



Inside view of the brick box showing unique ''cobweb^' con- 
struction. 



external mobile speaker 
(with an option to install a 
speaker-driver-amplifjer for 
higher power output) or a 
set of high- or low-imped- 
ance headphones. 

5) Permits you to plug in to 
an already-existing mobile 
installation such as a pri- 
vate aircraft audio panel or 
a VHF-FM boat system and 
use the microphone/ 
speaker/head phone setup 
in the mobile craft. 

6} All these goodies cost 
less than $10 (plus an extra 
$5 for the high-power 
speaker amp). 

Here are the ground rules 
for using this article: Most 
of the parts are available 
from any well-stocked ham 
store or "hobby-shop" elec- 
tronics place. You may free- 
ly substitute for any of the 
parts. None of the parts val- 
ues is really critical — a 
variation of ±20% should 
never really be noticed. 
Also, this article was writ- 
ten using the Tempo SI, 
and interfacing with stan- 
dard commercial FM micro- 
phones and aircraft micro* 
phone-headsets (carbon or 
amplified dynamic). Other 
rigs and other microphones 
may require modifications 
of the mike amplifier circuit 
as shown later. 

Regulator 

The power supply regula- 
tor must perform two func- 
tions. First, on a deeply-dis- 
charged nicad battery pack, 
the regulator must limit the 
charging current below ap- 
proximately 200 mA, Limit- 
ing the charging current in 
this manner prevents the 
cells from outgassing and 
drying out the electrolyte. 
Second, the charger must 
limit the end-charge volt- 
age to the cells to approxi- 
mately 1.37 volts for each 
cell, at which point the cells 
may be allowed to trickle- 
charge at this voltage in- 
definitely. 

The current limiting may 
be done by either of two 
methods. First, if the wall 
charger itself is one of the 



"12-V, 5D-mA" variety, no 
external limiting will be 
necessary. The wall charger 
itself provides the neces- 
sary current protection by 
its design. However, a fully- 
discharged 450-mAh bat- 
tery will require over 9 
hours to fully recharge, so 
you may wish to consider 
the alternative fast-charge 
circuit described a little 
later. 

For those using a current- 
limited wall-pack charger, 
the circuit shown in Fig, 1 
will regulate the final 
trickle charge voltage to 
1 .37 volts per cell, or an out- 
put of 11,6 volts into the 
Tempo SI CHC Jack. (1.37 
X 8 cells + 0.7 volts, to 
compensate for one silicon 
diode inside the SI in series 
with the charger line.) The 
basic circuit uses a 7805 (or 
78M05 or 78L05) regulator, 
with a Ik variable resistor 
used to set the exact output 
voltage. To set the output 
voltage accurately, con- 
nect a 470-Ohm resistor 
across the 11 .6-volt regulat- 
ed output and adjust R1 
(the Ik variable) for exactly 
11,6 volts on an accurate 
voltmeter across the 
470-Ohm resistor The value 
of CI (1000 |iF) is not criti* 
cal at all, providing that 
there is less than 150 mV 
ripple on the output with 
the 470-Ohm resistor at- 
tached. Up to a point add- 
ing more capacitance to 
this point increases the 
charge rate (milliamperes) 



3 5 m 
"CHAHG£R 
JACK 






TT 



3 pi wi fP 

"Charger" 

JACK 



p-ir 



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PLUG 

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IK 



F\g, 7. The basfc brick-box charger-regulator. 



of the wall charger. I found 
1000 ^F to be the optimum 

value; do not go below 0.1 
fiF or the regulator will 
become unstable. 

High-Power Regulator 

In the event you can get 
your hands on a wall power 
pack with more output or 
for those who are going to 
use the almost unlimited 
current available from an 
automotive (or boat, or air- 
craft, etc.l supply to re- 
charge the brick batteries, 
some method of current 
limiting must be employed 
to ensure that the nicad bat- 
tery pack does not overheat 
due to excess charging cur- 
rent. Incidentally, for those 
of you looking for a very in- 
expensive high-current 
1 2- volt wall-pack'Style 
charger, look in the auto- 
supply stores or the auto- 
motive department of the 
larger discount houses for a 
"cold- we at her battery 
maintenance charger," 
These little rascals !ook just 
like a low-power calculator 
wall pack, with one end ter- 
minated in a cigar lighter 
plug, but the fact of the 
matter is that they put out 
12 volts at a whopping 300 
mA. Don^t forget the 1(X)0- 
^F filter capacitor, though, 



because these high-power 
wall packs have a pretty 
raw, rectified ac waveform. 

The trick to use to keep 
the maximum available cur- 
rent below 200 mA is to use 
a 78L05 for the regulator 
called out above. The 
78X05 is actually a whole 
family of regulators where 
X defines the normal maxi* 
mum current available. If X 
= L [78L05), normal current 
maximum is 100 mA; if X == 
M (78M05). normal current 
maximum is 500 mA; and if 
X = nothing (7805), the cur- 
rent available is 1 Amp, 

Now, the internal cur- 
rental imi ting circuit in these 
ICs sets the current-limit 
point to about 150% of the 
maximum normal current, 
so if you use a 78L05 as 
your voltage regulator IC, 
the maximum current that 
your nicad pack can draw is 
approximately 150 mA, well 
within the maximum charge 
capacity of your brick's 
nicad pack. 

Since 1 had planned to 
use the brick box in aero- 
nautical mobile use in addi- 

tion to use with a high-pow- 
er wall-pack charger, not 
only did I use the 78L05 as 
my regulator, but I also sup- 
plied both a 3.5-mm jack on 
the brick box to plug-in the 



U2 
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Fig. 2. Adding charge-indicator circuitry. 

73 Magazine • November, 1982 27 



10 MOBlLf 



*l3eV IN 

BHQ 

sua 

HfC Kit 411 

kik; aud iiu 



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5-* 



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F/g. 3. r/ie deluxe mobile-base brick-box schematic. 



* S€€ TiieL€ FOR Vh^uES USCfi WITH ViRlOVS UiCRO^hONCS 06* 






(tT 



:\mB' 




Fig. 4. Parts changes for various microphone types. See 
Table 1 for values. 



wall pack charger and a 
cable connection to a mo- 
lex'*-type connector for at- 
tachment to the aircraft 
electrical system. As we 
shall see, using a 6-pin mo- 
lex connector allows me to 
use the mobile micro- 
phone and speaker/ 
phones, as well as the air- 
craft battery-charging sys- 
tem. 

Charge Indicators 

So far, we have a nicad 
battery pack charging sys- 
tem that will accept a low- 
or high-power wall pack or 
a battery-generator auto- 
motive-tvpe system. The 
first refinement to make 
will be a pair of LED lamps. 



One of the lamps will tell us 
when power is being sup- 
plied into the charger and 
the second lamp will tell us 
when the end-of-charge cy- 
cle of the nicad pack has 
occurred. The first lamp is 
easy: an LED and a resistor 
(R2) will tell us if our wall 
pack or auto system is 
plugged in. The second 
[end-of-charge) lamp re- 
quires a little more cir- 
cuitry. 

The heart of the charge 
lamp is a high-gain op amp 
[LM324) used as a com- 
parator. This circuit is 
shown in Fig. 2. The type of 
op amp is not critical, 
either The common 741 or 
any other true op amp may 



be substituted. The so- 
called Norton (LM3900/ 
MC3401) op amps may be 
used, but you are on your 
own for the circuit modifi- 
cations which are neces- 
sary. 

The 3.3-Ohm resistor (R3) 
introduces a negligible volt- 
age loss to the charging cir- 
cuit, yet drops more than 
enough millivolts for the op 
amp to work with. The pre- 
sumption is that when the 
charge current drops below 
20 mA. the mead pack is ful- 
ly charged. At this current, 
the 3J-Ohm resistor drops 
about 70 mV. The op amp 
senses this voltage drop 
and when the voltage drops 
below 70 mV, the charge 
light extinguishes. R6 (1 
Meg) sets the current level 
at which the charge light 
turns on and off; if you wish 
for the light to turn on and 
off at another current level, 
attach a resistive load of 
your chosen value from 
output to ground and select 
R6 until the light [ust flick- 
ers. Remember, now, when 
this lamp is lit, the nicads 



Microptione 



C2 



C3 



C4 



C6 



R7 



m 



R10 



Cartioii 10 mF 0-001 mF 10 mF 0.O02hF 1k 1k 

Crystaf/Ceramic Open 10 pF .005 f^F 20 pF Open Open 

Low-Z Dynamic Open 0.0Q1 f/F 10 ^F 220 pF Open Open 

Table 1. Values for various microphone types. 

28 73 Magazine • November, 1982 



10k 10k 

1 meg 1 meg 
10k 100k 



are charging and when it is 
dark, the nicads are either 
disconnected or tuity 
charged. 

Microphone Amplifier 

The second refinement is 
a matching circuit shown in 
Fig. 3 which will take the 
output of a standard mo- 
bile microphone (carbon or 
amplified dynamic) and 
massage it to fit the input 
requirements of the brick. 
(Note: for those of you us- 
ing straight low~z or highz 
dynamic, ceramic, or crys- 
tal microphones, see Fig. 4, 
The various values for Fig. 4 
are shown in Table 1 .) Since 
the requirements of the 
brick are a microphone 
voltage of some 200 milli- 
volts peak-to-peak and the 
output of the carbon/dy- 
namic microphone biased 
with 10 mA (by R7/R8) is 
about 500 millivolts p-p, the 
op amp circuit shown will 
provide an output some- 
what in excess of require- 
ments and can be adjusted 
to the proper deviation 
level with Rll. The ration- 
ale here was not so much 
that we had to have an op 
amp to drop a .500-mV level 
to 200 mV, which could 
well have been done with a 
simple resistive network, 
but we had one leftover op 
amp from the IC used in the 
charge-light circuit ^nd the 
op amp is necessary for the 
alternate mike circuits 
shown in Fig. 4. 

Once again, since this 
brick box was intended for 
use as both a base-station 
patch box and a mobile in- 
terface unit, a microphone 
jack was installed on the 
brick-box chassis, plus a 
pair of wires to the molex 
connector for attachment 
to the aircraft microphone 
and PTT switch. A switch 
was included on the brick 
box so that either internal 
microphone [the brick-box 
jack) or external micro- 
phone (through the molex 
plug to the mobile mike 
setup) could be selected. 
This was done so that the 



I 



pilot of the aircraft 
(WB6BHI] or the back-seat 
passenger (WD6EWI) could 
access the 2-meter rig sepa- 
rately and independent I V. 

The remainder of the ele- 
mentary brick box is quite 
simple, The speaker output 
of the transceiver is run to 
both the headphone jack in 
the brick box and a wire to 
the molex plug for external 
mobile speaker 

Speaker Amplifier 

Although this concludes 
the construction of the ele- 
mentary brick box, several 
comments from my fellow 
hams led to the first major 
modification of the box. 
Since my major application 
of the box was for airborne 
use and I was feeding the 
puny 1/2-Watt speaker sig- 
nal out of the brick into a 
10-Watt airborne cabin 
speaker amp, I never no- 
ticed how poor the speaker 
audio really was. A few 
tests convinced me that a 



speaker amp of some sort 
was in order. Since the most 
common high-power chip in 
general use and availability 
today is the LM383, I chose 
to use this fine device. Al- 
though the design is very 
straightforward, I recom- 
mend that you heat -sink 
this device to the biggest 
piece of metal you can find. 
In fact, if I were going to in- 
clude this circuit in my own 
brick box, I would undoubt- 
edly use the metal chassis 
cover for the heat sink The 
tried and proven circuit of 
the speaker amp is shown in 
Fig 5. 

Conclusion 

The brick box has been in 
operation for almost a year 
now with no serious prob- 
lems. My Si's batteries 
have always given me the 
expected service when 
charged by the box and mo- 
bile service has been be- 
yond any hopes I ever had. 
[You get up to ten thousand 



to MOBILE 
IHt5T*LL*TiON 



•13 6 \H 
AUPIO OUT 

UC KEy IN 
MIC AW IM 



\ *■ 



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* *- 









A 



3.5. mtn [l y^ * 

•charger" f ^ 



C9 

1 0OO;i»F 



>HOR|ES A 
HCADPHCME | 
OUTPUT 

m 




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TO tl T 

PhONE5/5Pk»I 
KEY \H °^ 

MIC ALfOrO IN 
GMO 



f /g. 5. Adding a high-power speaker amplifier. 



feet and call CQ on .52 
simplex!) My thanks to 
WD6EWI tor his comments 
and criticism and N6AUB 
for his patient on-the-air 
testing. My additional 
thanks to the hundreds of 



hams between Crass Val- 
ley, California, and Osh- 
kosh, Wisconsin, who gave 
us hints and suggestions for 
improvement during our re- 
cent aeronautical mobile 
cross-country, ■ 



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30 73Magazine • Novemberj982 




is 



,EA, the first company to introduce microcomputerized products 
to the Amateur Radio market, is proud to announce the second 
generation of computerized electronic keyers. Each keyer is pre- 
programmed, no computer language is required of the operator. 
pThe easy to use keypads eliminate up to 75 switches or potien- 
tiomeiers. thereby greatly simplifying the operation of such 
sophisticated keying systems. We invite you to compare the 
features of our keyers (shown below) to ANY others. 



I 



IMPORTANT KEYER AND/OR AEA AEA AEA 
I TRAINER FEATURES MM 2 KT-2 CK 2 



Speed Range (WPM) 



2 93 I '59 199 



Memory Capacity (Total Characters) 500 WA 500 



Message Partlttoning 



Soft hi/A Soft 



Automatic Contest Serial Number 



Ves N/A Y&s 



Selectable Dot ami Oash ftiemory 



Ves Yes Yes 



ifKfependeni Dot & Dash (Full) Weigtiting Yes Yes Yes 
Calibrated Speed, t WPM fles^jlytion Yes Yes Yes 



Dalibrated Beacon ^ode 



Yes N/A 



No 



Jiepeat Message Mode 



Yes N/A Yes 



Front Pane! Variable Monjior Frequency Yes Yes Yes 

Message Resume After PdMin tntermpi Yes N/A Yes 

Sfeiiii'Automatic (Bug) Mode Yes Yes Yes 
fleal Time Memory Loadifig Mode 



Yes N/A Yes 



Automatic Word Space Memory load 


Yes 


WA 


Yes 


Instant Start From Memory 


Ves 


niA 


Yes 


Message Editing 


Yes 


N/A 


Yes 



Automatic Stepped Vartaljle Speed 


No 


No 


Yes 


2 PresettaiJJe Speeds, Instant Recall 


Ne 


Nn 


Yes 


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Ves 


Yes 


N/A 


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Ves 


Ves 


N/A 


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Ves 


Yes 


N/A 


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Yes 


Yes 


N/A 


Standard Letters, Numbers- Punctuation 


Ves 


Ves 


N/A 


Afl Mofse Ctiaracters 


Yes 


Yes 


N/A 



For more information write AEA, or bet- 
ter yet see your favorite dealer for a 
demonstration. 



Software (£ copy right by AEA. 

PRICES AND SPECIFICATIONS SUBJECT TO 
IHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE OR OBLtGATION. 



4^2 



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APPLICATIONS, INC. 

P.O. Box C-2160, 

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(206) 775-7373 

Telex: 152571 AEA INTL 



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All antennas are complete with a Hl-Q Qalunor Hl^ 
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models only 50) ral^ for fyli t&gal pow€r Aniennas 
may be used as an inverted V and niay alK) be used 
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Antenna accessories— a va^JatDie with antenna orders 
Nylon guy nope 450i t^t 100 feet S4 49 

Cervnjc (Pagt)one Type) anterma insulators tl-SO pr 
SO-239 coax connectors S^ 

Ail prices are postpaid USA 46 
A variable a! your favoriie dealer or ofdier direct fronn 



^Fa ^K Dealer Inquiries Irivited 

Gorden 
Engineering 

BOX 21 305 B, SOUTH EUCLID, OHIO 44121 



^See Lssi of Advertisers an page 130 



73 Magazine • NovemberJ982 31 



George L Thurston fU W4MLE 
27 16 Cibbs Drive 
Taltahassee FL 32303 



What?! Another 
Audio Filter Project? 

Yup. And even the most modern receivers benefit from this 

QRM-crusher 



I got my hands on one of 
those toy transceivers a 
few months ago — the kind 
with a flea-power transmit- 
ter and a direct-conversion 
receiver— and for a while, I 
had a ball with it 

But slowly, some draw- 
backs began to manifest 
themselves — not so much 
in the rig, but inside my 
head, where ringing noises 
refused to go away, The re- 
ceiver is quite sensitive and 
has a tremendous dynamic 
range but it has no age 
(automatic gain control), so 
when you're tuning for 
weak DX signals and come 
across a Texas rock crusher 
...Well, I generally don't 
cherish corona flickering 
between my ears. 

It slowly dawned on me 

that even my main station 



receiver, though it has a 
good age system for CW, 
exhibits some other rather 
nasty habits which it shares 
with the little plaything re- 
ceiver. And eventually, 1 
began to think about doing 
something about it 

Unfortunately, most mod- 
ern ham-band receivers— 
even the very good ones — 
do very little after extract- 
ing audio from the product 
detector, except to amplify 
it and cram it into a speaker 
or a headphone output. 
Many things can be done to 
audio to make communica- 
tions a lot better, especially 
on CW. 

The audio unit to be de- 
scribed is my second major 
effort in that direction. The 
previous unit, built about 
1960, used vacuum tubes 
and weighed enough to 




*r FJLTEW 



CQHPHESSCifl 




Fig. 1. Audio processor block diagram, 

32 73Magazine • November, 1982 



keep my house and shack 
from blowing away in Hurri- 
cane Donna. That unit, de- 
scribed in a long article in 
QST,^ offered peak clip- 
ping, audio selectivity, and 
volume compression, none 
of which was available in 
the receivers of that day — 
or in most 1981 models. 
There is one big difference. 
Modern receivers usually 
(but not always) have age 
systems which work well 
with SSBandCW. 

My new audio processor 
would have to be all solid 
state, like the rest of my 
equipment and it would 
have to offer the same fea- 
tures as the original, with 
suitable improvements. 

If you work contests or 
DX piieups on CW, you 
know that a 400-Hz pass^ 
band sounds like you're lis- 
tening to all outdoors, espe- 
cially if you have experi- 
enced the good selectivity 
of the 100-Hz~and-under 
variety. 



But selectivity has its 
tradeoffs. Any sort of noise 
impulse is stretched. Key 
clicks, which sound like a 
small-arms fight in some 
Middle Eastern desert, be- 
come a rolling artillery bar- 
rage when they're stretched 
through a sharp fitter. So, 
even with a good receiver 
age, you still need to do 
something about the noise 
pulses before you intro- 
duce selectivity. 

And, for those receivers 
without age or only a poor 
age, audio compression 
works wonders. Before 
good age was developed 
for SS B and CW, a CW oper- 
ator had to tune his receiver 
with one hand on the dial 
and the other on the rf gain 
control. Even with that kind 
of receiver (or with a mod- 
ern direct-conversion job 
with no age), one-handed 
tuning becomes possible 
when you use audio com- 
pression. 



So, I decided my fancy 
solid-state processor must 
begin with a peak clipper, 
followed by a good stage of 
selectivity, followed by 
compression, and then 
(finally] by enough power 
to drive a loudspeaker and 
phones. It must be con- 
nected to the receiver only 
by a patch cord from the 
headphone or speaker out- 
put to the processor input, 
so that no modifications 
need be made to the receiv- 
er (see Fig. 1). 

Clipping 

Clipping and compres- 
sion are terms which are 
often misunderstood. Clip- 
ping, for our purposes, is 
the process of whacking off 
any audio signal which ex- 
ceeds some preset ampli- 
tude. The waveform is 
grossly distorted and lots of 
harmonics are generated in 
the process. 

The clipping circuit cho- 
sen for this application is 
the familiar full-wave, se- 
ries peak clipper (Fig. 2). It 
works like this: 

Audio from the receiver 

is fed through a capacitor 
to a pair of small silicon 
diodes (1 N914s or similar) in 
series, anodes connected 
together. A positive voltage 
is applied to the anodes, so 
that current flows through 
both diodes to ground 
through load resistors. 

As long as those diodes 
conduct, they look like 
pieces of wire to the audio 
signal coming in from the 
receiver But the moment a 
positive audio peak voltage 
becomes greater than the 
forward bias, the diode 
ceases to conduct; and the 
signal can't get any bigger 
in that direction. The nega- 
tive half cycle, though, goes 
through because it only for- 
ward biases the diode even 
more. 

But the other half cycle 
then collides with the sec- 
ond diode, with reversed 
polarity, and the other 
audio peak is clipped off. A 
good sine wave applied to 



ftF OUTPUTS 




*7Q 



a3>*F 
-)j > TO COMPRESSOR 



4700 



Fig. Z Clipper-selectivity section of processor, Q1 andQ2 are PNP audiotransistors such as 
the 2 N 3906. L1 and L2 are B8-mH telephone toroids. See text for CI and C2. 



the clipper comes out look- 
ing much like a square 
wave. Noise pulses, of 
course, also are clipped. 
How deeply the signal is 
clipped depends on how 
much bias voltage is ap- 
plied to the diodes by the 
10k pot. The voltage can be 
made so high that no clip- 
ping occurs, or so tow that 
no signal gets through at all. 
The clipper can also be de- 
feated by closing SW2 
shunts the audio 
the diodes com- 



which 
around 



pletely. 

In use, the clipping 
threshold is set at some in- 



termediate point which the 
operator finds to be com- 
fortable. The setting will be 
affected, of course, by the 
audio gain control on the 
receiver. 

Selectivity 

The output of the clipper 
is fed to the selective cir- 
cuit through a capacitor 
which blocks dc. Any of a 
variety of selective circuits 
could be used here, includ- 
ing the popular bridged-T 
active audio filters using IC 
op amps. I chose to use par- 
allel-resonant 88-mH tele- 
phone toroids because \ 



can change the resonant 
frequency simply by chang- 
ing the values of the paral- 
lel capacitors. To change a 
bridged-T involves three ca- 
pacitors in each pole of the 
filter. (See Fig. 2J 

The output of the clipper 
is applied across one 88-mH 
toroid tuned to 700 Hz with 
capacitors totaling 0.57 fiF- 
Another blocking capacitor 
isolates the toroid from the 
dc on the base of Q1. The 
transistor amplifier restores 
the considerable insertion 
loss caused by the clipper 
and the toroid filter. Any 
handy transistor can be 



imVF 



PMOMEB 




TO 



/fr 



Fig. 3. Audio compression and power. Q3 is a 2N3819 FET or any similar audio FET. U3 is a 
TLOB! FET op amp. U4 is an EC5700, ULN2277, or FE IC27, 01-07 are 1N914s or similar. 

JBf^agazme • November, 1982 33 



Tl 



IZQVJLC 




Of! EOUiylLLEHT 




/» 



^f,%^'' 




TO B[f«Dl«ia PDSt 
EXTERMAL SAT TEH t 

TO INTERNAL CtRCUTT 



Fig. 4. Power supply suitable for the audio processor 



used, and the ones I used 
were junk box PNP silicons 
which were probably refu- 
gees from a Radio Shack 
red-tag sale. If you use 
NPNs or germaniums, be 
sure to make the neces- 
sary circuit changes, includ- 
ing polarity and bias. Al- 
most any inexpensive audio 
transistor in a suitable am- 
prrfier circuit will do the 
job. 

The output of Q1, taken 
from the collector, is cou- 
pled to the second toroid, 
tuned to the same frequen- 
cy as the first, and again the 
insertion loss is restored by 
Q2 Actually, it is some- 
what more than restored^ 
and the output is ample to 
drive the next stage. 

In operation, you can 
elect to use both toroids, 
for maximum selectivity, 
only one toroid for inter- 
mediate sharpness, or nei- 
ther one, leaving you with 
only the selectivity of the 
receiver itself. Switching is 
done by means of diodes, 
so that signal leads can be 
kept on the circuit board, 
and not run to the front 
panel. With SW3 in position 
2 (Off), neither toroid is in 
the circuit because its 
ground return circuit is 
open. 

In position 1, positive 
voltage is applied to D3, 
making it conduct and be- 
come virtually a short cir- 
cuit to ground, thus com- 
pleting the toroid circuit. In 
position 3, voltage is ap- 
plied to D5, thus grounding 
the return for L2. The same 
voltage turns on D4 which, 
in turn, turns on D3 so that 
both toroids are now in the 
circuit, for maximum selec- 
tivity 



Compression 

Compression is a some- 
what misunderstood term. 

Here it is used to mean au- 
tomatic control of the 
audio gain so that the am- 
plifier output remains vir- 
tually constant, despite 
large changes in the input 
level. The process does not 
distort the waveform of the 
signal. (See Fig, 3.J 

In the circuit I chose,* the 
compression amplifier (U3) 
is a TL081 FET op amp, inex- 
pensive and readily avail- 
able. The output of the fil- 
ter is fed to the non-invert- 
ing input of op amp U3, and 
its output is fed to the input 
of an audio power amplifier 
chip, U4. 

The output of U3 is also 
fed to a voltage doubter 
formed by D6 and D7. This 
generates a positive dc volt- 
age which is proportional to 
the audio output voltage of 
U3, and this dc voltage is 
fed to the gate of FET Q3. 

The FET acts simply as a 
variable resistor Note that 
audio coming out of the fil- 
ter stage is fed to the top of 
a voltage divider composed 
of R1 and R2. The input of 
the op amp is taken from 
the midway point on this 
divider The bottom half of 
the divider, R2, is paralleled 
by the source-drain circuit 
of the FET. 

The ground return of the 
voltage divider is the center 
of another voltage divider, 
formed by R4 and R7, 
across the power supply 
voltage. This tap is also the 
ground return for the 470- 
Ohm resistor in the invert- 
ing input lead. This makes it 
possible to use only a single 
power supply for U3, rather 
than two. 



With no signal applied to 
the input of U3, no output is 
generated, hence no volt- 
age from the voltage dou- 
bier. The FET is biased to 
"pinch off" by the voltage 
across R2, which makes the 
gate negative with respect 
to the source. 

When an audio voltage 
appears at the input of U3, 
a positive dc voltage ap- 
pears across the voltage di- 
vider and this is applied to 
the gate of the FET via D7, 
opposing the negative bias 
and allowing the FET to be- 
gin to turn on. The more 
audio out from U3, the 
more positive bias, and the 
more the FET turns on, mak- 
ing its resistance lower and 
lower The effect is the 
same as moving the input to 
U3 further toward the 
ground end of a volume 
control; it applies less audio 
voltage to the input thus 
cutting back on the output 
The result is excellent vol* 
ume compression in which 
the output remains almost 
constant despite great 
changes in input level. 

Some of the output 
audio is picked off by the 
volume control and fed to 

the audio amplifier IC, U4. 

Audia Amplifier 

A considerable variety of 
audio amplifier ICs is avail- 
able I used a ULN2277 for 
U4, which provides two 
Watts per channel, and I on- 
ly used one channel. An 
LM386 could be used and 
will provide about half a 
Watt of audio to drive a 
small speaker beyond en- 
durable volume. It costs 
about one dollar at ham 
supply houses* 

Power Supply 

A regulated power sup- 
ply (See Fig. 4) is used be- 
cause the regulator IC pro- 
vides excellent ripple filter- 
ing, not because anything 
needs a regulated voltage. 
The rectifier is a small. 
cheap bridge or it can be 
made up from discrete 
diodes rated at one Amp or 



more at 35 volts or more. 
The regulator chip will 
deliver one Amp, maximum, 
regulated, and that's proba- 
bly three times the actual 
demand of the system. The 
output amplifier chip prob- 
ably can be run directly 
from the unregulated out- 
put of the power supply, 
provided this does not in- 
troduce noticeable hum in 
the output 

Construction 

Construction is straight- 
forward and non-critical. I 
built the power supply into 
a corner of a small alumi- 
num cabinet box, using a 
small piece of perf board to 
mount the components. 
The board was mounted to 
the chassis with the small 
metal mounting lugs ob- 
tained by drilling them off 
old-style tie-point strips. 
This type of mounting is ex- 
tremely convenient because 
it permits standing the 
boards on edge and pro- 
vides for easy removal for 
service or modification. 

The IC circuits were built 
on universal circuit boards/ 
One board was sawed in 
half, and the compressor 
and clipper built on one 
half, the output amplifier 
on the other 

The toroids were 
mounted on a piece of perf- 
board with dabs of five-min- 
ute epoxy, leads anchored 

to tie-points, and then the 
perf board was bolted to the 
edge of another type of 
universal circuit board on 
which each cluster of four 
holes is connected together 
by a foil pad. This is useful 
for mounting the transistors 
and other components by 
their leads. 

Each board was stood on 
edge and bolted to the 
chassis with brackets. But 
these should not be used 
for circuit grounds. Groun- 
ding each board directly to 
the chassis will probably 
result in ground loops 
which produce hum, noise. 



34 73 Magazine • November, 1982 




CONPRO 





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73 Magazine • November, 1982 35 



oscillation, end all sorts of 
nasties. 

Instead, use a common 
ground on each circuit 
board insulated from the 
mounting feet, and connect 
the circuit ground with a 
wire directly to the negative 
voltage tie-point on the 
power supply board. 

Operation 

After the project passes 
its "smoke test/' you're 
ready to learn to use it. 
Hook it up to your receiver 
and hook up the output to a 
loudspeaker. 

Set the volume control 
about one-fourth open, put 
the selectivity switch In the 
Off position, and turn the 
clipper on Feed a steady 
signal into the amplifier. 
The tone from a 100-kHz 
calibrator will work fine. 
Adjust the clipping thresh- 
old, noticing that at the 
clockwise extreme of the 
pot, you get no signal out- 
put at all. At the counter- 
clockwise position you get 
no clipping and at points in 
between clipping is appar- 
ent because of the change 
of audio quality of the 
clipped signal. 

Flip in one filter section 
and notice that the clipped 
signal suddenly sounds 
clean again. The harmonics 
have been filtered out The 
second toroid section won't 
seem to have much effect 
in this test — but it will in ac- 
tual operation. 

Now find a place on the 
receiver dial which is fairly 
clear of signals, turn off 
clipping and selectivity. 
and set the receiver volume 
control until you can just 
hear the crackle of back- 
ground noise in the speaker, 
or to where you can hear a 
weak CW signal. Leave the 
volume control set, and 
tune across the band slow* 
ly, stopping to listen to 
each signal you come to. 

Loud signals are no loud- 
er than weak ones, but you 
will notice that the back- 
ground noise disappears 
while a strong signal is pres- 

36 73 Magazine * November, 



ent. This is because the 
compression has reduced 
the overall gain. 

Now tune away from the 
strong signal to a no-signal 
spot and listen. Notice that 
after a few seconds, back- 
ground noise slowly be- 
comes audible, as the com- 
pressor increases gain 
again It has a fast-attack, 
slow-decay time constant. 

Decay time is set by R5 
and C3 in the gate circuit of 
the FET, Resistor and ca- 
pacitor values are chosen 
to give a delay of several 
seconds so that the ampli- 
fier won't "pump'' on a 
strong CW signal Instead, it 
reduces gain in proportion 
to the average strength of 
the signal and keeps the 
gain reduced during the 
brief key-up periods be- 
tween letters and words 
and even during brief 
pauses. 

If recovery time were 
very short, band noise, 
weak QRM signals slightly 
off frequency, and other 
disturbances would appear 
in the background instantly 
whenever the desired sta- 
tion released his key— very 
tiring and disturbing to the 
receiving operator. Try it if 
you like, by temporarily re- 
placing C3 with, say, a 
47-hF capacitor. 

Changes to Play With 

The overall design of this 
unit is quite flexible and, 
since it is built in modules, 
with each section on Its 
own circuit board, it is quite 
easy to experiment 

Various degrees of selec- 
tivity can be achieved, for 
example, by shunting the 
toroids with resistors, to 
broaden them, or by adding 
a third toroid for extreme 
selectivity. Various kinds of 
active audio filters can be 
substituted for the toroids. 
Skirt selectivity of the tor- 
oid filters can be improved 
by insertion of two 1N914s 
reverse-connected in paral- 
lel between the first toroid 
and the coupling capacitor 
to the base of Q1 [see Fig. 

1982 



OUT 




'! 1 



AF [NPUT 



fig. 5. Compfession contra} modifications. 



1). These are silicon diodes 
which will not conduct at 
all until forward voltage 
across the junction exceeds 
about 7 volts. Therefore, 
the base of Q1 won't 'see' 
any output from the toroid 
until the voltage rises 
above 0.7 volts, thus effec- 
tively rejecting low-level 
QRM on the skirts of the 
filter. 

The compression thresh- 
old can be manipulated 
over a wide range, if de- 
sired, since compression 
does not begin on weak sig- 
nals until they reach a cer- 
tain minimum voltage. 
That's because the FET is 
pinched off and some of 
the bias must be overcome 
before the FET drain begins 
to conduct at all 

However, if the drain is 
removed from the R3-C4 
tap [leaving the other com- 
ponents attached), and con- 
nected to the wiper of a 
pot, this delay of the attack 
can be changed at will (see 




Fig. 5). One end of the pot is 
connected to +12 V dc and 
the other end is grounded. 
When the wiper is ground- 
ed, the FET turns fully on, 
reducing the op-amp out- 
put sharply. 

When the wiper is moved 
toward the top of the pot, 
the source becomes more 
and more positive. Hence, 
the gate becomes more and 
more negative with respect 
to the source, and more and 
more compression bias is 
required from the op amp 
to turn on the FET. It is pos- 
sible to set the pot to pro- 
vide compression on any 
signal, no matter how weak, 
or to prevent compression 
of any but the very stongest 
signals. 

An S-meter can be built 
which will show the relative 
strength of received signals 
by measuring the compres- 
sion bias [see Fig. 6). A sim- 
ple FET voltmeter reads the 
bias generated by the op- 
amp output 

The unit can be muted 
for full break-in [QSKl CW 
operation if desired by us- 



COMPRESSION 



4 



I'tOO 



Q5 



-"ft'* (I NJ^H-^ 



SE?ISITIVITT 
_lS-liETEB 



/ff 



JDO& 




Ml 



^ 






^^ METER 



Fig. 6. Optional S-meter circuit 



:^A\ 






^^^ 



<^ #/ 



i»» ^* 



*k!# 



•> ^ > 






^*Vf^ 



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J*j»€ 



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t^S^e List of AdverHisEfs on page 130 



73 Magazine • November, 1982 37 




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ing a transistor switch to 
clamp the clipper diodes 
when the key is down. The 
keying signal for the transfs- 
tor can be a logic low or 
high picked off from a sol- 
id-state electronic keyer, 
such as the Accu Keyer, or 
by the relays of other key- 
ers. See Fig. 7 

When the muting transis- 
tor iS off, which it always is 
when the key is up, it has no 
effect on the operation of 
the diode clipper, but SW2 
must be open for muting to 
function properly. 



When the key is down, 
the transistor turns on to 
saturation. This offers a 
low-resistance path to 

ground for the dc bias on 
the diodes, effectively 
grounding both the diodes 
and the audio signals pass- 
ing through them. Because 
of its lower junction volt- 
age drop, a germanium 
transistor will work better 
here than silicon. Even so, 
muting is not absolute and 
some signal from the re- 
ceiver gets through at low 
level The circuit does not 



01 



*F m> — )f — ♦ 




.01 




01 



Q4* 



^1- 



t (OOK 



^W b 



J[p* 2003. ^004. 2005. 
SlUiLAfl PUP 



2?M 



TO LOGIC 

TURNS O* OK 

LOGIC HiQH 

{+5V] TUfiJMS IT OFF. 



Fig. 7. Muting circutt added to peak clipper. 



affect operation of the rest 
of the audio processor. 

Sidetone can be injected 
into the amplifier when the 
key is down, making it ap- 
pear in the same speaker 
which carries the incoming 
signals {see Fig. 3). Since the 
sidetone is injected after 
the clipping, compression, 
and selectivity, it is not af- 
fected by processor opera- 
tion and can be set for any 
convenient pitch or vol- 
ume. 

Several inputs can be 
provided for the processor, 
selecting them by switch 
from the front paneK This 
makes it possible to use the 
processor on just about any 
receiver in the shack. 

Auxiliary outputs often 
come in handy, too, for 
driving phone patches and 
similar uses, I provided 
mine with three front-panel 
headphone jacks — one of 
each of the popular sizes of 
plugs — so that any handy 
headphones can be plugged 
in without a hassle. 

I built in a little two-inch 
speaker for convenience in 
testing and portable opera- 
tion, but a phone jack is 
provided for an external 
speaker. Plugging in the ex- 
ternal speaker mutes the in- 
ternal one. Both speakers 
can be muted by a front- 
panel switch, if desired. 

A back-pane) switch can 
be added to allow operat* 
ing the unit from an auto- 
mobile battery for Field 
Day or emergency situa- 
tions. The SPDT switch is 
connected with the pole to 
the internal +12-volt lines 
of the circuit boards. One 
contact is connected to the 
output of the 12-volt regu- 
lator chip. The other con- 
tact is hooked to a back- 
panel binding post which 
goes to the external battery. 
A second binding post 
should be provided to per- 
mit connection to the bat- 
tery negative. 

A 1000-fiF 35-volt capaci- 
tor is connected from the 
pole of the switch to 
ground, It helps with the fil- 
tering of the regulator out- 



put and, when used on a car 
battery, it helps to subdue 
ignition and voltage regula- 
tor noises and alternator 

whine 

Troublesliooting 

Troubleshooting the pro- 
cessor is as simple as trou- 
bleshooting can be. Noth- 
ing is critical as to value or 
adjustment, except that the 
tuned filter circuits must be 
on exactly the same fre- 
quency. Failure to operate 
properly will almost always 
prove to be traceable to a 
wiring error or a faulty 
diode, transistor, or IC chip, 
a solder bridge on a circuit 
board, or failure to solder a 
connection. ■ 

References 

1. George Thurston W4MLE, "A 
Versatile Receiver Audio Sys- 
tem," QST, May, 196Z 

2. C. W. Andreasen N6WA. "The 
Amazing Audio Elixir." 73, Sep- 
tember, 1979. Note that the dia- 
gram in this article has an errof- 
The lead from CR2 to the gate of 
the FET is not connected to the 
voltage divider or to the source 
of the FET. What is shown as a 
connectior> dot should be a non* 
connecting cross-over. 

3. Suitable audio amplifier chips 
available from Radio ShacH and 
other suppliers inctude: 
LM1877N-9, dual-channel, two 
Watts per channel, (catafog 
number 276-702); LM386, one* 
channel, 400-mW output (276- 
1731); LM383/TOA2002. one- 
channel e-WaltS (276'703); 
BA521, one-channel 5 J Watts 
{276-704K 

4. The \0 board is available from 
several suppliers, such as Glob- 
al Specialties Co., 70 Futlon Ter- 
race, Box 1942, New Haven CT 
06509, or 351 California St.. San 
Francisco CA 94104. or from 
Radio Shack, catalog numt)er 
576-170. for about $3.00 each. 
This board is perforated for 10 
chips and has lands which per- 
mit connecting up to four com- 
ponents to each IC pin. 

The second type of universal 
board has a quad land pattern, 
that is, each cluster of four 
holes in a square is connected 
by foil. It is excellent for mount- 
ing transistors and other com- 
ponents by their leads. Sold by 
Calectro (Q.C. Electronics), cat* 
alog number J4'609, for less 
than $2.00 each. 



3fi 73Maga2tne • November, 1982 




COMMUNICATIOISB 

TERMINALS 




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Seven large 256 character memories are backed up 
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You won't buy any other communications terminal 
once you have studied af) the advanced operating 
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complete. 





The Drake Theta 550 is a compact 

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LA7 Line Amplifier 



Line output, input levels as low as 15 mV rms (47 kitohm) will result in an output of 
1 mW nominal into a 600 ohm balanced line. Output level adjustable by internal pre- 
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9Std9torte jnd speah^t 
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Features: Deluxe CMOS 

Eiectronic Ke yer 

k State Oftfie aft CMOS arcuitry 
I Self cornpietmg dots and dashes 
ft Both dot and dast^ mvmQry 
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5-50 wpm 



Sp^ed, weight, tone, vofvme tune controls & Bsdetone and 

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Wired and tested^fuhy guaranteed— less battery 



MODEL TE133 -same 3S fit44 ^ttn vtgt ^nd tone cortttot mternai. fess semi- 
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GK 2 Con lesL Memory Kay^r 99.00 

K T- 2 Key e r/T ra i ner 89.00 

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40 73 Magazine • November, 1982 



Ducks are settins 

smaller! 
and. 



\ i& 



V ^ 



eri 



Because you and the 
leading radio manu' 
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best-performins, the 
best looking antenna; 
Centurion has grown 
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better, and now the 
new^est duck*.;the Tuf 
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shorter (about 3") yet 
it's a full 1/4 wave 
radiator on VHE 



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^See u&t of Advemsers on page T30 



73 Magazine • November J982 41 



73 Magazine Staff 



A Tuner for Antenna Fanatics 

Anyone experimenttng with antennas needs a darned good 

tuner Construct this one and save your finals. 



Various antenna tuner 
networks for the HF 

bands have come and gone 



over the years, but two 
forms have evolved as time- 
proven favorites — the Pi 



?^ & 



SWR 



/ 



S3 a 






Sfb 



/ 



1 



^1 



OUT 



^3 






L 



1 






sz ay^ s 



T 







hr^*"'*^^ 



fig. 1. Tuner circuitry^ The 52 switch arrangement may ap- 
pear comp/ex, but wiring is not complicated nor are long 
lead lengths introduced, since most of the wiring is between 
switch lugs. Normally, a two-wafer switch would have to be 

used, although single-wafer surplus switches having a 5P3T 
action can be found. C1 and 2^ at least 250 pF each, rated 
at i:5 kV for 300 Watts, 2 kV for 500 Watts, and 4 fcV for 1 
kW; L-^IB to 28^H, t^W or 12 wire; SI and 2-Centralab 
PA-2000 series or similar. 

42 73 Magazine • Novemtier« 1982 



and T networks. The basis 
for the durability of these 

networks is a combination 
of electrical as well as con- 
structional reasons. 

The Pi network will not 
match an extreme range of 
impedances, but it is rel- 
atively easy to construct 
and adjust in operation. Its 
main disadvantage is that 
it requires considerable 
amounts of capacitance on 
the lower frequency bands 
when working into low-im- 
pedance loads. Usually, 
padding capacitors are re- 
quired across the variable 
capacitors on the lower fre- 
quency bands when a high- 
power tuner is being con- 
structed since 1,000- or 
2,000-pF variable capaci- 
tors rated at 2 to 3 kilovolts 
are not exactly common 
items. 

On the other hand, the T 
network does not require 
extreme amounts of capaci- 
tance even on the low-fre- 
quency bands when match- 
ing into the same or even 
greater range of load im- 
pedances than a Pi network 



will accommodate. The T 
network is, however, slight- 
ly more tedious to adjust 
and also to construct since 

the variable capacitors 
used must have both their 
stator and rotor sections 
above ground The popular 
"Transmatch/' by the way, 
is a basic variation of the 
T network. 

But why not have the 
best of both networks in a 
single multiband tuner? 
This article describes a 
switchable, multi-network 
tuner which is designed to 
optimize the matching po^ 
sibilities available using 
commonly-available L/C 
components of moderate 
electrical and physical di- 
mensions and, of course, 
of moderate cost. The tun- 
er can be tailored to han- 
dle PEP output powers 
from 500 to 1000 Watts. 
The physical dimensions 
are quite moderate for the 
power-handling capabili- 
ties involved and one easi- 
ly can add such features as 
selectable antenna switch- 
ing and swr monitoring. 



The schematic of the tun- 
er is shown in Fig. 1, As 
shown, it incorporates se- 
lectable LG, CL% or T-net- 
work tuning, input switch- 
ing direct to any of three 
loads (one of which can be 
a dummy load), switching 
using the tuner network to 
any one of two sefectable 
antenna loads, and com- 
plete, internal swr measure- 
ment circuitry. Of course, 
one can scale up or down 
the possibilities shown in 
the schematic in any way 
desired in order to con- 
struct just the basic tuner, 
expand the antenna switch- 
ing possibilities, etc. 

The reason for having se- 
lectable LC- or CL-network 

tuning (a reversible L net- 
work) instead of a simple Pi- 
network option is to further 
increase the mileage ob- 
tainable out of the compo- 
nents used. Since two vari- 
able capacitors have to be 
used in the design of the 
tuner, the option is avail- 
able to use them in a con* 
ventional Pi-network man- 
ner as tunable input/output 
capacitors or to parallel 
them and use them as com- 
bined output or input ca- 
pacitors in a reversible L 
network. The tatter will pro- 
vide a greater range of im- 
pedance-matching possi- 
bilities at the expense of 
only a bit more component 
switching complexity, and 
so it was used. 

If one uses a convention- 
al input/output tuned Pi 
network with extremeiy 
wide*fange variable capaci- 
tors, it usually will be found 
that any load that can be 
matched using both vari- 
able input/output capaci- 
tors can also be matched 
using only either a variable 
input or output capacitors 
and a suitable value of in- 
ductance. However, the ca- 
pacitance range of a sin- 
gle variable capacitor re- 
quired will usually be less 
than the combined capaci- 
tance of separate input/out- 
put variable capacitors in a 
Pi network. 



The practical construc- 
tion details of the tuner are 
not difficult to follow or 
perform if you approach 
them on a step-by-step ba- 
sis. The 500-Watt output- 
rated version of the tuner is 
housed in an attractive two- 
tone blue/gray Radio Shack 
enclosure S270-2693 mea- 
suring 7-7/8" X 3-1/2" X 
5-7/8'', This aluminum hous- 
ing is easy to work and you 
can construct the tuner us- 
ing basic hand tools. 

After you have initially 
sized-up the placement of 
components within the en- 
closure, drill or punch out 
the necessary mounting 
holes on the rear panel for 
the coax connectors, on the 
bottom of the enclosure for 
inductor and capacitor 
mounting, and on the front 
panel for control shafts, 
switches, meter, etc. Gener- 
ally, the following se- 
quence of mounting and 
wiring and components will 
make the tuner go together 
easily: 

1) Mount the front-panel 
network changeover switch 
and the rear-panel coax 
connectors. 

2) Mount the two variable 
capacitors. These capaci- 
tors have to be ''above" 
ground. There are numer- 
ous ways to achieve a suit- 
able mounting. The sim- 
plest is probably through 
the use of plastic #6 mount- 
ing screws/nuts with 1/4" 
spacers to keep the capaci- 
tor rotors above ground. If 
such material is not readily 
available, a 1/4"-thick piece 
of PlexiglasTw or bakeiite 
can be used to raise the ca- 
pacitors above the enclo- 
sure bottom using metal 
hardware. 

3) Wire up the network 
changeover switch to the 
capacitors with leads ex- 
tended to where the indue* 
tor and antenna selector 
switch will be mounted. 

4) Mount the variable in- 
ductor and the swr mea- 
surement circuitry (if used). 

5) Mount the antenna selec- 
tor switch to the back panel 



I Txmn »40oicup i#io^ oven »Ecaii04Kv 




S(« 



Fig, 2. The swf circuitrY is simple but sensitive and needs no 
shielding inside the tuner enclosure. With a 50-Ohm carbon 
resistor on the SI side and the nneter switch to reflected, ad- 
just C1 for minimum meter reading. Do the same with C2 
when the resistor is connected to the rf in side and rf is fed 
into the SI a side of the circuit 



(using 1/2" to 3/4" standoff 
hardware) and wire it up, 
6) Mount the insulated 
shaft couplings on the vari- 
able capacitors, extension 
shaft to the antenna selec- 
tor switch, etc. 

Of course, you can vary 
the location of the compo- 
nents in a variety of ways, 
but you should more or less 
plan out the construction of 
the tuner in the manner il- 
lustrated above. It really 
takes less time to complete 
than is involved in even as- 
sembling a commercial kit 
which often has rather la- 
borious point-to-point wir- 
ing instructions. 

Another swr bridge cir- 
cuit was constructed using 
a toroid^core transformer 
and it worked very well. 
The circuitry of the bridge is 
shown in Fig. 2. The compo- 
nents are mounted on a 
small piece of perforated 
board stock; there is no 
need to etch a board for the 
few components involved 
and they can be wired to- 
gether directly, 

The board is mounted in- 
side the rear panel of the 
tuner directly by the input 
coaxial connector. No 
shielding is required since 
the toroid is largely self- 
shielding. The sensitivity 
allows for measurements 
with 10 to 20 Watts of trans- 
mitter output power even 
on the low-frequency 



bands. The only thing that 
you must do, however, is 
to balance out the stray ca- 
pacitances in the circuitry 
as noted in the caption for 
Fig, 2. The procedure is 
simple but it cannot be ne- 
glected if proper readings 
are to be obtained on 10 
and 1 5 meters. 

The meter used hap- 
pened t& be a surplus CB 
one that had an swr scale, 
but any inexpensive meter 
with a 200-mA or more sensh 
tive movement will suffice. 
There is no real need to cali- 
brate the meter since it nor- 
mally is used only to adjust 
the tuner for a minimum 
reading in the reflected 
switch position once the 
meter has been adiusted for 
a full-scale reading in the 
forward switch position. 

A minor point, by the 
way, about the meter 
switch used: It is spring- 
loaded, so it must be 
pushed down to read for- 
ward and will snap back to 
its reflected position [la- 
beled SWR). This small re^ 
finement makes it rather 
easy to adjust the tuner 
since the way the switch 
and meter adjustment con- 
trol are placed on the front 
panel the index finger on 
one hand can be used to de- 
press the switch while the 
thumb and middle finger 
are used to adjust the con- 
trot. The other hand is free 



73 Magazine • November, 19B2 43 



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to adjust the tuning 
controls. 

Speaking of controls, 
there is no tyrns indicator 
on the rotary inductor. 
Regular turns counters take 
up a tot of enclosure space 
and are not ail that neces- 
sary unless you insist on ex- 
tremely fast control preset- 
ting. In reality, if you note 
the setting of all the other 
controls for the band/anterv 
na being used, it is a simple 
matter to rotate the induc- 
tor for approximate mini- 
mum swr and then finish up 
the tuning by going back 
and forth between the in- 
ductor and capacitor tun- 
ing controls. 

It's no secret that it gen- 
erally only makes sense to 
home-brew a tuner if one 
can find the components 
necessary at reasonable 
prices. If you built a 
500-Watt version of this 
tuner using all new, off-the- 
shelf parts, the parts cost 
could easily run around 



$120. On the other hand, us- 
ing surplus or new surplus 
parts, the cost could be as 
low as $25 Simply hunt 
around for the parts needed 
at the right prices. Fair 
Radio Sales (1016 E. Eureka, 
Box 1105, Lima OH 45802), 
for instance, which fre- 
quently advertises in 73, 
often has very good buys on 
transmitting-type variable 
capacitors and inductors. 

The tuner has been la- 
beled as a ^Universal Cou- 
pling Unit." That euphuistic 
name was only the result of 
having a limited selection 
of words available in a rub- 
on lettering set. No tuner 
will, of course, couple to 
absolutely all loads. The 
tuner described will couple 
a 50-Ohm output transmit* 
ter to just about any reason- 
able antenna load; the 
same as can be done by 
commercially available 
tuners which use the same 
type of circuitry and com- 
ponent dimensions ■ 




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44 73 Magazine • NovemtJer, 1982 



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Digital Basics 



This is no time to be a digital illiterate. Part III reveals the 

secrets of multivibrators, shift registers, 
and other notorious devices. 



fr — ^ — 










-T *-* 




0^ 




1 




























Ttmsm 












0-^- 


— -» 


<— -t 






^ 





Fig. Ifal One-shot mukivi- 
brator. Trigger pulse causes 
output to go HIGH for peri- 
od J. The second pulse has 
no effect 



The first two parts of this 
three-part series led you 
step by step into the digital 
electronics swimming pool. 
We now can wade in past 
the ankle-deep water of the 
kiddies' pool and venture 
into knee-deep water. Thus 
far, we have discussed the 



T •(!,<- ♦,! 



J 






* 
1 



i 

Vt 

I 
I 
I 
t 
I 



TRIGGCf) 






Fig. 1(b). A retriggerabte monostable multivibrator can be 
retriggered v^hile f/ie output is still HICH. Note that the 
total duration of the HfCH state is not 2T 

46 73Magaiif}e • Novemt>er, 1982 



!oseph I Carr K4iPV 
5440 South Sth Road 
Arliniiion VA 22204 



various digital !C logic fam- 
ilies, assorted types of 
gates, and a variety of flip- 
flops. We now will turn to 

the subjects of multivibra- 
tors and counters. 

Multivibrators 

A multivibrator is basi- 
cally a pulse-producing cir- 
cuit. There are three basic 
forms of multivibrator: 

monostable, bistable, and 
astable. It takes little imagi- 
nation to detect that these 
designatrons refer to the 
stable output states that are 
possible for each type of 
circuit. 

The monostable muItivF 
brator has but one stable 
state [usually the state in 
which Q = LOW . but not 
always). Triggering the 
monostable multivibrator 



causes the Q to go HIGH 

for a time, but since this is 
not a stable state, Q will 
drop LOW again when a 
pre-determined time period 
has elapsed, Monostable 
multivibrators are also 
called one-shot circuits and 
also (erroneously, albeit 
graphically} pulse-stretcher 
circuits. The latter label is a 
misnomer because the cir- 
cuit does not actually 
stretch a pulse but gener- 
ates a new pulse that has a 
longer period 

The bistable multivibra- 
tor has two stable states. It 
can remain in either state 
(i e , Q=LOW or Q^ 
HIGH) indefinitely. The RS 
flip-flop is an example of a 
bistable multivibrator. 

The astable multivibrator 
has no stable states. It is in- 



capable of remaining m ei- 
ther Q LOW or Q HIGH 
states. The Q output of the 
astable muttivibrator will 
flip back and forth between 
the HIGH and LOW states, 
producing a square-wave 
pulse-train output signal 
For this reason, the astable 
circuit is usually used to 
produce the clock pulses 
found in digital circuits, 

There are several ways to 
produce each of these 
types of multivibrator. 
Space prevents us from 
considering all of them We 
will examine a few circuits 
built from discrete gates 
and the integrated circuits. 
Some IC devices, like the 
555 timer, will operate in ei- 
ther the monostable or 
astable mode. 

When we speak of bista- 
ble multivibrators, we actu- 
ally are talking about the 
RS flip-flop. Recall from the 
earlier sections of this arti- 
cle that the RS FF can re- 
main happily \n either the 
Q=LOW or the Q = H1GH 
states indefinitely. 

Most monostable multi- 
vibrators will not respond 
to further input trigger 
pulses until the period of 
the output pulse has "timed 
out/' Le., the output has re- 
turned to its stable state. 
Monostables that will not 
respond to further trigger 
commands until the output 
duration has expired are 
nonref riggera ble monosta- 
bles. 

Some one-shot circuits, 
however, are reiriggerable, 
meaning that they will re- 
spond to further input trig- 
ger commands while the 
one-shot is in the unstable 
state (Le,, before it has 
timed out). Consider Fig. 1 
to see how this works. Fig. 
1(a] shows the operation of 
the regular nonretrigger- 
able one^shot multivibra- 
tor. The first trigger pulse 
causes the output to go 
HIGH and it remains HIGH 
for period T. A second trig- 
ger pulse has no effect on 
the one-shot because it oc- 
curs before T expires. 



Now consider Fig. Itb). 
This is a timing diagram for 
the retriggerable monosta- 
ble multivibrator- The out- 
put goes HIGH when the 
first pulse arrives. But be- 
fore T expires, a second trig- 
ger pulse is received. This 
second pulse causes the 
one-shot to retrigger, so the 
output will remain HIGH 
for an additional period T. 
Note that the total duration 
of the HIGH state is not 2T, 
but T plus the portion of the 
first period that expired 
prior to the second trigger, 

orT+rr,-Ta 

An example of a mono- 
stable multivibrator built 
from a CMOS type-D flip- 
flop is shown in Fig, 2. Re- 
call the rules for the type-D 
FF: (1) Since D is HIGH, a 
HIGH will be transferred to 
the Q output when the CLK 
line goes HIGH, and (2) 
when the clear line goes 
HIGH, the Q output is 
forced LOW. The operation 
of the one-shot circuit in 
Fig. 2, then, is as follows: 

a) When the circuit is at 

rest, Q is LOW and any 
charge on capacitor CI is 
drained off through diode 

or 

b) When a trigger pulse is 
received by the CLK input; 
Q goes HIGH. When Q is 
HIGH, capacitor CI will 
charge through resistor R1. 

c) When CI has charged 
to a potential of approxi- 
mately 2 volts, the clear in- 
put thinks it is HIGH, so the 
FF will force Q LOW 

d) The period that Q was 
HIGH, i,e., the period of the 



ji - 



TRdCCLR 




• OUfHJT 



Fig, 2(al A CMOS flip-flop is the basis for this monostable 
multivibrator. Rl and CI determine the ler\gth of the pulse. 
D1 allows the flip-flop to be retri^ered immediately after 
clearing. 



one-shot, is determined by 
the time constant of R1C1 

and the potentials of the Q 
output and the point at 
which the clear input thinks 
that it is HIGH instead of 
LOW. 

The circuit in Fig, 2(a) 
uses a diode (Dl) across the 
timing resistor (Rl) to dis* 
charge CI during the period 
when Q is LOW, This diode 
is not strictly necessary but 
serves to speed up the cir- 
cuit considerably. Without 
Dl, the charge on capacitor 
CI would bleed off through 
Rl. But this would require 
another Rl CI time constant 
(or so) before the voltage 
across CI would discharge 
enough to permit retrigger- 
ing of the one-shot The pur- 
pose of Dl is to discharge 
CI rapidly so that retrigger- 
ing can occur almost imme- 
diately after Q drops LOW 
— see the waveform in Fig, 
2tb) 

The use of Dl creates a 
little problem, however. 



►«- 




Fig. 2(b}. The potential 
across CI never drops 
below 0.6 volts because of 
the presence of Dl , 



* otrrpuT 




Fig. 3, Monostable multivi- 
brator The diode in Fig. 2(a) 
is eliminated by using Qi to 
discharge C7. 



PARALLEL OUTPUTS 



a I 



QZ 



Qi 



INPUT * 






OS 



CLOCK fr 




SEftiAL 
OUTPUT 



Fig. 4, Flip-flops can be combined in series to form a register which can store several bits of 
data. This version has serial input and either serial (SISO) output or parallel (StPO) output 

73Magazine • NQvember, 1982 47 



CUOCK 



J~l 

FLFLFLFLFLFLR 



01 * 



QZ, 



OJ*- 



04 



I35> 



Fig. 5. The data bit fO) is iransmiued through a ffve-stage 
St SO shift register by docking the register five times. 




Fig. 6. Data is entered into this paraltel-entry shift register 

via ST-Sn- Before entry^ the register is reset via R. The data is 
fhen loaded by bringing the set fine (S) HiCH. 



m 



^ 



% »• 







Ro- 



"^ 





Bl 



3i 



Fig. A The iam parallel-input shift register eliminates the 
need to clear the registers. 



The charge potential across 
CI cannot drop lower than 
the function potential of 
the diode (200 to 300 milli- 
volts in germanium types 
and 600 to 700 millivolts for 
silicon types). Fig. 3 shov^/s 
the circuit for a modified 
version that uses switching 
transistor Ql to discharge 
CI. The base of transistor 
Ql is driven by the NOT<) 
output of the 401 3 flip-flop. 

Shift Registers 

A flip-flop is able to store 
a single bit of digital data. 
48 73 Magazine • November, 1982 



When two or more flip- 
flops are organized to store 
multiple bits of data, then 
they constitute a register. 

Most registers are merely 
specially-connected arrays 
of flip-flops. 

There are several differ- 
ent circuit configurations 
that one would call a regis- 
ter, and we classify them 
according to the manner in 
which data is input and out- 
put to and from them. We 
have, for example, serial-irh 
seriai-out (SI SOX serial-irh 
parai lei-out (SIPO), parallel* 




>OUT 



Fig, 8. A recirculating shift register automatically couples 
the output data back to the input This is something like a 
dog chasing its tail 



-tSVOC 



V 

f ^^^^ 

<h J 0< • 

-' c 

« 5 * 



Fig, 9(al The core of most 
frequency counters is the 
j-K flip-flop configuration. 
In this case the I and K in- 
puts are both tied HICH. 



A 



F/4 



F/fl 






TFI 



rF2 



PF3 



: 


FF4 




1 


c 







Fig. W(al By cascading 
several }-K flip-flops, the 
division ratio increases by 
powers of two, 

in-parallel-out (PIPO), and 
paraltel-irhserial-out (PI SO). 
Fig. 4 represents both 
SISO and SIPO shift regis- 
ters. The only significant 
difference is that the paral- 
lel output lines, used on the 
SIPO register, would be ab- 
sent on the SISO register. 

The SIPO shift register 
consists of a cascade chain 
of type-D flip-flops that 
have their clock tines con- 
nected together Recall the 
rules for type-D flip-flops: 
Data can be transferred 
from the D input to the Q 
output only when the clock 
input is HIGH. The input 
can change at will and the 
output will remain the same 
as long as the clock line is 
LOW. But if the clock tine 
goes HIGH, the Q output 
wilt follow the D input The 
Q output will retain the last 
valid data present before 
the clock dropped LOW 
again. 

This rule can be applied 
to the situation shown in 
Fig. 5, where we show the 
transmission of a single bit 
of data from left to right 
through a SISO shift regis- 




MfnjT 







r 



bj 



T__J 1 



Fig, 9(bl A single l-K flip- 
flop is a divide-by-two 
counter. 

ter. At the occurrence of 
the first clock pulse, the in- 
put line is HIGH. This point 
is the D input of FFl, so a 
HIGH, which is applied to 
the D input of the second 
flip-flop (FF2), remains after 
the clock pulse disappears. 
When the second clock 
pulse arrives, FF2 sees a 
HIGH on its D input and 
FFl sees a LOW on its D in- 
put This situation causes a 
LOW at Ql and a HIGH at 
Q2. 

The third clock pulse 
sees a LOW condition on 
the D inputs of FFl and FF2 
and a HIGH at the input of 
FF3. The third clock pulse, 
then, causes Ql and Q2 to 
be LOW and Q3 to be 
HICH. 

Note that the SISO input 
remains LOW after the ini- 
tial HICH during clock 
putse number 1 . This means 
that the single HIGH condi- 
tion will be propagated 
through the entire SISO 
shift register, one stage at a 
time The HIGH bit will 
shift one flip-flop to the 
right each time a clock 
pulse arrives. 

If the data at the input 
had changed, then the bit 
pattern at that input would 
be propagated through the 
shift register, 

The shift register in Fig, 4 
is a five-bit, or five-stage, 
register (any bit length 
could be selected). On the 
sixth clock pulse, therefore, 
the HIGH is propagated out 
of the register, so all flip- 
flops are now LOW. 



CD 



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SP-3 Bsse station speaker 49.50 

MB-5 Mobile rriounL 720A/730...,. 19 50 

Ptione pateh: specify radio ffteg. %UB\ SALE 129 95 
AH4 Mobile ant. /tunef (Rteg. $289).... SALE 259 95 
AMOO lOO^auto tuner (Reg $349)., SALE 314 95 
AT- 500 500w auto, tunei (feg. $449J .. SALE 399 95 

fC-2KL Solid'Steie \mm (fteg, $1795) SALE S1395 00 
IC'R70 Gen. cov receiver (Reg. $795} SALE Sfi99-95 I 



SAVE $$ - VHF/UHF 




fC'251A 2m All-mode Xcvr 144 8148 1999 MHz. lOw. 
digital, memories, scan. 2 VFOs 13 Svdc/117vac. ^Wh 
- 9'rw - lO'r^d. 11 lbs fReg. $749}.,. SALE $599.95 
iC45lA UHF A!l Mode Transceiver for OSCAR nwide Bor 
J g simplex. Models for 430-440 or 440-450 ^Hi Similar 
to IC-251A (fegular $899)....., SALE S769.95 

tC-AGl UHF Preamp (Reg $89).... SALE 79.95 
IC-5510 6m SSB/CW/FM^ transceiver 50 &3 SBBMHi. 

80 watts, (Reg $699)...,.... SALE $599.95 

EX lOr FM adaptor (Reg $125) SALE 112.95 

PS-20 AC power supply (Reg S229) .- SALE 199,95 

CF-1 Cooling fan: PS-20, *.,..•„. 45.00 




IC 290A 2m All Mode motiJIe xcwi. 14aS-14gl99 
MHz. i/lOw, 5 memories, 2 VFOs. T/T mic. S^^^w^ 
2' "fi *8H''d (Reg $549)........eioseoiit $399 J5 

IC'290H 25w 2m Alf Mode (Reg. $549] SALE 489.95 
IC 490A UHF All Mode mobile xcvr, 430-439 995 
MHz, lOw, memories, two VFOs, scanning microphone 
2-'h "fi^'w^r^'d (Reg $649).,,. SALE $579 95 

(C'5&0 Sm SSB/FM/CW mobile kcvi lOw. dtgifdl. 
/nemof les. scan, two VFOs 13 8vdc/3-5A t'-^'h « y'.*'* 
" 9-d, 6 lbs Mic & mt fReg. $489) „.SIU $439 95 

IC'25A Compact 2m FM mobile xcvr 25w, 5 memories, 
start, priority, 2 VFOs, T/T microphone 2"ti«5frw 

«7"d. 3Vilbs (Reg. $349) ...SALE $309.95 

fC^45A 440-450 mobile xcvf TBA 

IC-22y 2m mobile 1/lOw. thumbwtieel freq select 

^yiti-2V\\ " SV'd. (Reg. $299] SALL $249 95 

EX- 199 Remote frequency selector.... ♦.•„,.,+,*, 35,00 

VHF^UHF PtJrrjbiev. 

IC-202S 2m SSB Transceiver 3w PEP output Uses X 
eljs, optional Nicad paclt/cliargef or AC supply/spkr 
" 'h mtc. ant S strap (Reg $279)..... SALE S249 95 

1C^20L 2m, lOw ampi (Reg $98)... SALE 89.95 
IC-402 432 Mtiz portable SSB Transceiver. Features 
same as IC202S above (Reg S389).... SALE 349.95 

IC-30L 10ft. 432 amp (Reg $1051... SALE 94,95 

BC 15 Nicads & ACcfigr lor 202S/402...., 57 50 

BC 20 Nicads S DCOC chgr for 202S/402 .*.„.,, 57 50 
lC-505 6m SSB poft CR^g $449} SALE 399.95 

tnlerngl nicad battery pack , 79.50 

SP4 Remote speaker for portables,..., 24.95 




SAVE $30 



IC'ZAT Synthesized 2m FM Handheld 
with T/T pad 800 th in 5 KH/ steps 
144 147 995. selected t)y ttiumb if fleets 
* *5 RMz upsJiifi switch: t 600 KHz 
ottsets. 15 or 1 5w output witti supplied 
ncad pack Optional r^cks lof lafger 
capacrty or ftigher power. Supplit^d wrtfi 
250 rma, mead pack (BP-S), wall charger, 
flex antenna. beJI clip, strap, earpfione 
and plugs 6.6"fi«2S"w-L4"d. lib. 



Regulir SALE 

$269-50 $239.50 
.239.50 214.50 



299.95 
269.00 

29900 



23995 
22995 

239.95 
229.95 
Regular 
$12.50 
.69.00 
.. 39 50 
,29.50 
12.50 
49.50 



fC'ZAT HT w/TTP, mzsd & chgr .. 
fC-2A 2m HT w/nicad & waif cfrgr 

fC-3AT 220 HT/nP. nrtad & ctigr 
IC-3A 250 HT/mcad Sctiarger.... 

iC-4AT 440 HT/TTP, mead ^ chgr 

IC-4A 440 HT/nicad & charger.. 269.0Q 

Hanti-iioUi ^ccesi^ortPi 

BC-2511 Extra wail ctiarger „ , 

eC-30 Drop m cfiarger for BP-2, 3 & 5 ,_...,. 
BP-2' 450 ma. 72v mead pk. Iw oiitpifl..... 

BP-3 Extia 250 ma ntcad pi 1.5i» oytpyt,,., 
BP-4 AJkafine battery case.. ...... „„..„,.„, 

BP-5* 450 ma. I08v nicad ph. 2.3w output.. 
*BC-30 required to charge BP-2 k BP-5 

CP-1 Cif^ lighter plug & cord; BP 3... *,,o* 9.50 

DC-1 DC operation module*. ,..*... -..-.:;. * 17,50 

FA- 2 FJ***ibie antenna lor 2A, 2AT (BNC) 10.00 

HM-9 Speaker /microphone,. *.*... ...,„... 34.50 

LC 2A Leatfier case w/o RP cut-out.....,- 34.95 

LC-2AT Lealher case w/TTP cut-out....... 34 95 

ML'l 2m mobile Imear (Reg $89) ........SALE 79.95 

3A-TTN 16-bytton nP front; 2A/3A/4A., ........ 39 50 

Commspec SS'32M 32tone encoder............. 29.95 

iC-M12 12ch. Marine Hand-held. ...Special $229.95 
Other tCOM accQ^SQfies: 
24PP 24 pm accessory plug.. ..,.*.„.*.*,.*•,,, $ 4.00 
BC lOA f^em. backup. 25A/720A/73O/74O 9 50 



*■**'« 



■rii--r-4--w+¥i--i 



38. ?5 
34,00 
17.50 
34 50 
29.00 
49.50 
39,50 
34.50 
3900 
All Sm\\v Prices subfect la ch^n^e wtthouf notice. 



BU-1 Menwry bacfc'Up, 25A/490A. 

EX-2 Relay box w/mafker; 72aA/730...._.. 
HII-3 Deluxe mobile mic. specify radto.^.i., 

HM-5 f^ise cam mobile mic, 4 pin .*^ ..* 

FIM'7 Amplrfied mobile mic, 8-pm 
HM-8 Touch tone mtc, 8pm,. 
HM-10 Scanning microphone 

HP-1 Headphones..*. 

SM S 8' pin electret desk mic. 



, ri-fev,-.^!.! 



'*>****»■'*•*--• 



•********%' 





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73MagaZfne • November, 1982 *49 



The SI SO shift register 
can be made into a SIPO 
device by adding parallel 

output lines at Q1, Q2, Q3, 
Q4, and Q5. 

One use for the SIPO reg- 
ister is seriai-tCHparallel bi- 
narycode conversion. For 
economic reasons, digital 
data usually is transmitted 
as a serial stream of bits, 
i.e., the bits of the digital 
word are sent over a com- 
munications link. But most 
computers and other digital 
instruments use a parallel 
form of data entry. Parallel 
data transfer is more expert 
sive but is considerably 
faster than serial transmis- 
sion. If, for example, we 
have an eight-bit system, 
we would need an eight- 
stage SIPO shift register to 
convert the serial code to 
parallel form. The code is 
entered into the SIPO regis- 
ter one bit at a time so that 
after eight clock pulses the 
first bit will appear at Q8 
and the last bit at Q1- 

Parallel-entry shift regis- 
ters are faster to load than 
serial-input shift registers. 
This is because a single bit 
can be changed, if needed 
In the serial type, to change 
a single bit of data requires 
us to ripple through the en- 
tire contents. 

There are two basic 
forms of parallel data entry: 
parallel and jam. In parallel 
entry, shown in the partial 
schematic of Fig 6, the reg- 
ister must first be cleared 
(i.e., all bits set to zero] by 
bringing the reset line mo- 
mentarily LOW, The data 
that is applied to inputs B1 
through Bp, can be loaded 
into the register by momen- 
tarily bringing the set line 
HIGH. 

The jam entry circuit 
shown in the partial sche- 
matic of Fig. 7, is also able 
to load data from bits Bl 
through Bp. While jam en- 
try may not look superior at 
first glance, it is, because IC 
shift registers using this 
technique have interna! in- 
verter stages at the complex 
ment inputs. These have 
their inputs connected to 



CLOCK 



ft 2 



C 4 



P « 



J 



J 



Fig, TOffaJ. A modulo-IS ripple counter has four outputs. 



Clock* 




Fig. n{a). A cour)ter can have somethir)g other than a di- 
vide-by~twa ratio when the flip-flops are forced to reset. The 
7400 turns a d/vide-6y-s/xteen counter into a divide-by- 
ten circuit 



TjTj 



CLOCK 




J 



T 



< I 



n 



PiBlOO Tj-Tg com* TEH 
fItSCTS TO fOOOOl 



CLEAR 



U 



Fig. 7 1(bl After ten pulses, the counter resets. The result is a 
decimal 'based counter. 



the non-complemented in- 
puts, eliminating the need 

to clear the register before 
loading. 

A recirculating shift reg- 
ister is shown in Fig, 8, Since 
the output of a serial shift 
register allows the outside 
world to see only one bit at 
a time, we must empty the 
entire contents of the shift 
register in order to read 
these contents. But that 
would ordinarily destroy 
the data, because the input 
would be HIGH or LOW 
during the entire operation. 
A single-read operation, 
then, would fill up the regis- 
ter with all ones or zeros. 
The recirculating shift regis- 
ter connects the output (se- 
rial output) back to the in* 



put so that a read opera- 
tion would automatically 
rewrite the data back into 
the shift register. 

Digital Counters 

A digitBl counter is a de* 
vice or circuit that operates 
as a frequency divider. The 
most basic digital counter is 

the |-K flip-flop connected 
with the / and K inputs tied 
HIGH (i.e., placed in the 
clocked mode). This makes 
the output produce one 
output pulse for every two 
input pulses. It is, then, a bi- 
nary or divide-by-two 
counter. 

Those fancy digital fre- 
quency/period counters are 
nothing more than digital 
divide-by-10 counters con- 



nected so that the binary- 
coded output is converted 
to a decimal display. 

There are two basic 
classes of digital counter 
circuits, serial and parallel. 
The serial counters are 
called ripple counters be^ 
cause a change in the input 
must ripple through all 
stages of the counter to its 
proper point. Parallel 
counters also are called 
synchronous counters. 

In a ripple counter, the 
data is transferred serially; 
which means that the out- 
put of one stage becomes 
the input of the next stage* 

The basic element in 
most counters is the 1 -K flip- 
flop, See Fig. 9(a). Note in 
the figure that the / and K 
inputs are permanently tied 
HIGH, so they will remain 
active. 

A timing diagram for this 
divide-by-two circuit is 
shown in Fig. 9Cb}, and it 
shows the action of the cir- 
cuit, )-K FF outputs change 
state on negative-going 
transitions of the clock 
pulse. In Fig. 9[b), the first 
negative-going transition 
causes the Q output to go 
HIGH. Q will remain HIGH 
until the input sees another 
negative-going clock pulse. 
At that time, the output will 
drop LOW The action re- 
quired to make a complete 
output requires two clock 
pulses, so this |-K flip-flop is 
dividing the input frequen- 
cy by two. 

We can make a binary 
ripple counter by cascading 
two or more stages, as 
shown in Fig. lOta). This par- 
ticular circuit uses four J-K 
FFs in cascade. Any num- 
ber, however, could be 
used. 

The major problem with 
this type of counter is that 
only those division ratios 
that are powers of two can 
be accommodated. In the 
four-stage circuit shown, 
the possible division ratios 
are 2, 4, 8, and 16. 

Frequency division is one 
major use for a counter cir- 
cuit. In some electronic in- 
struments, for example, we 
may want to prescale a fre- 



50 73 Magazine * November, 1982 





16 
MODELS 



MFJ-941C 300 Watt Versa Tuner II 

Has SWR/Wattmeter, Antenna Switch, Balun. Matches everything 1.8-30 MHz: dipoles, vees, 
random wires, verticals, mobile whips, beams, balanced lines, coax lines. 




Ham Radio'm mo»t popular 
antenna tunar. improvad, too. 




95 

(+$4) 



Fisiesi selling MFJ lynef < * * Iwcause it has 
tlie most wanted features at tiie best price. 

Matctiei everyfhing (mm 1.fi-3DMHi: dipoles. 
inverted vees, random wires, verticals, mobile 
whips, beams, balanced and coax lines, 

iun up (0 300 walls RF^ power &i|t|M- 

SWR m6 dual range wattmeter f^OO & 30 
watts lull scale, fomard/reflected power). Sensi - 
tive meter measures SWR to 5 watts. 

MFJ-900 VERSA TUNER 



~'^^ j^w 



MFJ-900 



^^m *49 



95 



Matches coai« randorrr wires 1.8 30 MHz 

Himlles ijp lo ZOO watti output; etticient air 
wound inductor gives more watts out. 5x2x€'\ 

Uie my traftscelvir, sohd state or tube. 

Oiwrale all bindt with one antenna, 
2 OTHER 2D0W ttOD€LS: 

MFJtOI, S59.95 ( + S4}. like 900 but fncliKles 
4.1 balun for use with balanceij lines 

MFJ^IIOIO, $39.95 ( + $4), lor random wires 
m\i. Great lor apartmefit, motel, campmg. opera- 
tiof^. Tunes 1.8-30 MHz. 

MFJ-984 VERSA TUNER IV 




MFJ-984 



^329 



95 

(+S10J 



up to 3 KW P£F and ir matches any feeilline, 
I. a 30 MHi. coax, balanced or random. 

10 imp RF immtttr assures max. power at 
mm SWR. SWR/Wattmeter. for./ret., 2000/200W. 

11 iMfiUlin ituii inductor, ceramic switch. 

7 poi. ant swrtch 250 pt 6KV cap Sxl4xl4". 

300 win iinnmy kiad. 4:1 fenitc t^lun. 

3 HORE 3 KW HODELS: WJ 981, $139 JS 

( f $10). Itke 934 iess ant. twitch, ammeter. 

MFJ*9I2, $239.95 (4^S10K HNe ^34 less am 
meier^ SWR/Waltmeter. HFJ*9«0, S209.9S 

( + $10). like 98? less ant switch. 

p'Sm Ust of Atfifefmers on page f30 



Flexible intenrva switch selects 2 coax lines, 
direct Of through tuner, raiidom wire/ljafanced line, 
or tuner bypass for dummy load, 

12 position efflclertt alrwound Induclor for 
lower losses, more watts out. 

Buit^in 4:1 balun for balanr^ecf lir^es. IDOOV 
capacitor spacing. 

W§rtcs wHIi all sorid state or tutw rigs. 

Eaty to use, anywhere. Measures Sx2x6'\ has 

MFJ-949B VERSA TUNER II 



MFJ'949B 




Wfft btfl 3Q0 watt Vefsa Tuner II. 

Malches everyth^nt] from 1.8-30 MHz, coax, 
randoms, balanced lines, up to 300W output, 
sotid^state or tubes. 

Tunet oul SWR on dipoles. vees. long wires, 
verticals, whips, beams, quads, 

6«ilt4n 4:1 balurf. 300 W . 50 ohm dummy load 
SWR meter and 2 fange wattmeter [300W & 30W}. 

i pititfort antenna iwttell on front panel, 12 
position air wound inductor: coax connectors, bind 
ing posts, black and beige case 1Qx3x7". 

MFJ*089 VERSA TUNER V 




MFJ-gB9 



$ 



329 



95 

( + S10) 



N«w imatier siio matches new smaller rigs - 
OfUy 10 3/4Wx4.1/2Hx14 7/8D*. 

3 KW PEF* 250 pf 6KV caps. Matches coax, 
balanced lines, random wires 1.8 30 MHz. 

Roller Induclor, 3 digit turns counter plus spin 
nef Icnob tor precise inductance coniroJ to get 
thai SWR down. * 

Mtt-in 300 Wilt, 50 ohm dummy load. 

Inil^n 4:1 lerrtte balyn. 

iuilHn hghted 2\ meter reads SWa plus for 
ward/retlected power. 2 ranges (200 & 2000W). 

6 position anU switch. Ai catirnet Tilt ball 



SO 239 connectors. 5'way binding (M)sts. fin- 
ished m eggshell whtte w^th walnut-grained sides. 
4 mtier 300W Models: MFJ-940R, $79.95 
( + $4)^ like 941 C less balun. IMFJ-945, $79.95 
( + $4). liice 941 C less antenna switcti. IMFJ-944, 
$79.95 (+S4J. like 945. less SWR/Wattmeter. 
MFJ^943. $69.95 I + S4). NKe 944. less antenna 
switch Optional mobile bracket for 94 f€. 940B, 
945, 944, $3.00. 

MPJ-0e2 VERSA TUNER III 




MFJ^62 



*229 



95 

(+510) 



Run up to 1.5 KW PEP, match any feed bne 
from Id- 30 MHz 

loit^ SWRyWattmctsr has 2000 and 200 
watt ranges, forward and reflected^ 

G position antenna switch handles 2 coax lines 
(direct gr through tuner), wire and balanced lines, 

4:1 balun. 250 pf 6KV cap 12 pos. inductor. 
Ceramic switches. Black cabinet, panel. 

ANOTHER 1,5 KW MOOEi: MFJ 951. S1S9.95 
( + $10), simifar but less SWnyWartmeter. 

MFJ'10, 3 feel coax with connector** $4.95. 



To order or for your near«&t dealer 

^ CALL TOLL FREE P*;" 
El 800-647.1800 > 



For tecti into., order or repair status, or calls 
outside continental U.S. and inside Miss,, call 
601-3235869 

• Ai MFJ pfodticts uncofHlttionally gtitranteed for 
one year (except as noted)* 

• Products ordered Itom IIFJ art ft tumibfe wttmir 
30 days for full rettind (les i shipping). 

• Add shipping A handling chargei In amountt 
shown In parenthesef. 



Write for FREE catalog, ovdr 50 products 

ENTERPRISES, 

INCORPORATED 



MFJ 



^47 Box 494, Mississippi Slate, MS 39762 



73 Magazine • Novenr^berj982 51 



CLOCK 




Fig. 12. By feeding the clock inputs in parallei a synchro- 
nous counter becomes much faster than the ripple version. 



CPI • 



ci»z» 




TO OTHER 
STAGES 



Fig, 13. A preset counter can be made by using a iam input. 
When CP2 is raised HIChi a preset bit pattern is entered. 



PntML * 


^ 


* 


t 


\ 

1 


* 


* 

1 

1 


i 

1 

1 


f 

i 

■ 


» 
^ 


Q 






1- 








1 






, 


• 






^ 


























INI»UT • — < 


FFI 




1 — *■ 















ii 

FF4 
4 





Fig. 14{al A counter can count down by toggling each flip 
flop with the preceding stage's Q output 



quency, i.e,, divide it from 
some other frequency to a 
lower frequency that can 

be handled by a digital 
counter or other digital in- 
strument. 

But this is only one appli- 
cation for the counter cir- 
cuit. One of the most com- 
mon applications, alluded 
to in the last paragraph, is 
to count, i.e., tell us the to- 
tal number of pulses that 
passed Consider again the 
circuit of Fig. 10(a) and the 
timing diagram of Fig. 1(Xb). 
Obtputs A, B, C, and D are 
coded in binary, with A be- 
ing the least significant bit 
and D the most significant 

52 73 Magazine • November, 



These are weighted in a 
1-2'4-fl code system to rep- 
resent decimal digits to 9 
or hexadecimal digits to 
15. These are the normal 
weights of the binary num- 
ber system. 

Consider the timing dia- 
gram of Fig. 1(Kb). Note that 
all B output changes occur 
following the arrival of a 
pulse. After pulse number 
one has passed, the Q^ line 
is HIGH and all others are 
LOW This means that the 
binary word on the output 
lines is 0001 ^ (i.e,, 1 ^q); one 
pulse has passed. 

Following pulse number 
2 we would expect 001 Oj 



(i.e., 2t J because two pulses 
have passed. Note that Qg 
is HIGH and all others are 
LOW. The digital word is, 
indeed, 001 0^ 

The counter in Fig. 10(a) 
is called a modu/o-T6, or 
base-16, counter, or a hexa- 
decimal counter (all mean- 
ing the same thing). The 
output of a hexadecimal 
counter can be decoded to 
drive a display device that 
indicates through 9 (i.e., 
decimal) or through F 
(hexadecimal). In most ap- 
plications where a real, live, 
human is to read the dis- 
play, a decimal readout is 
provided. 

Decimal Counters. A dec- 
imal counter operates in 
the base-to, or decimal. 
number system. The most 
significant bit of a decimal 
counter produces one out- 
put pulse for every ten in- 
put pulses. Decimal count- 
ers are also sometimes 
called decade counters. The 
decimal counter forms the 
basis for digital event peri- 
od, and frequency counters. 
Thus, the hexadecimal 
counter in Fig. 10 is not suit- 
able for decimal counting 
unless it is modified for 
base-10 operation. 

Fig. n shows a TTL hex 
counter modified by adding 
a single TTL NAND gate. 
Recall that a TTL J-K FF 
uses inverted inputs for the 
clear and set functions. As 
long as the clear input re- 
mains HIGH, the flip-flop 
will function normally, but 
when the clear input is mo- 
mentarily brought LOW, 
then the Q output of the FF 
goes LOW. 

The decade counter in 
Fig. 11(a) is connected so 
that ail four clear inputs are 
tied together to form a 
common clear line. This 
line is connected to the out- 
put of a TTL NAND gate 
(i.e , one section of a 7400 
device). Recall the rules of 
operation for the TTL 
NAND gate: If either input 
goes LOW, then the output 
goes HIGH, but if both irv 
puts are HIGH, then the 
output goes LOW, 



The idea behind the cir- 
cuit of Fig. 11 is to clear the 
counter to 0000 following 
the tenth input pulse. Let's 
examine the timing diagram 
in Fig. 11(b) to see if the cir- 
cuit does the correct thing. 
Up until the 10th pulse, this 
diagram is the same as for 
the base-16 counter dis- 
cussed previously. 

The output of the NAND 
gate will keep the clear line 
HIGH for all counts 
through 10. The inputs of 
this gate are connected to 
the B and D lines. The D line 
stays LOW, forcing clear 
HIGH up until the 8th input 
pulse has passed. At that 
time— To in Fig. 11(b)— D 
will go HIGH and bit B 
drops LOW, so the clear 
line remains HIGH for the 
9th pulse. 

The clear line will remain 
HIGH until the end of the 
10th pulse. At that point (T^) 
both B and D are HIGH, so 
the NAND gate output 
drops LOW, clearing all 
four flip-flops (i.e.. forcing 
them to the state where all 
four Q outputs are LOW). 
The counter is therefore re- 
set to 0000. 

The reset counter pro- 
duces a OOOO code, so the B 
and D outputs are now 
LOW. forcing the clear line 
HIGH again. The entire re- 
set cycle occurs during peri- 
od Tj— TJ This period has 

been expanded greatly for 
graphic illustration pur- 
poses in the figure, but ac- 
tually takes only nanosec- 
onds or microseconds. 

The 11 th pulse will incre- 
ment the counter one time, 
so the output will be 0001 j. 
The count sequence, in dec- 
imal then, is ai 2-3^5-6-7- 
8-9-0-1 etc. The output 
code is a ten-digit version of 
four-bit binary (hexadeci- 
mal) and is called binary- 
coded decimal, or BCD 

Synchronous Counters. 
Ripple counters suffer from 
one major problem: slow 
speed. The counter ele- 
ments are wired in cascade, 
so an input pulse must rip- 
ple through the entire chain 
before it affects the output. 



1982 





appiG 





APPLE REVIEW WINDOW 



OIFOK TEST I 

31 1 

6<BRAG I 

9t I 

/(TIME ) 



1 IRV TE5T i 

4 I ) 

7 iCONTEST I 

: t » 

{ I 



2 1CQMSG 
S I 
tCOUNT 



_ftCV rWOWMt ASCM7 TTO DVL- A D^DS 

1 1 70 K - 072 WM ICL 1237 46 

THIS IS THE REVIEW WINDOW 
IT ALLOWS LOOKlNCi BACK AT HISTOfllCAl 
DATA WHICH HAS SCHQLLEO OFF THE 
SCREEN (SfVEM UNES* 

THIS IS THE SHORT OlAlOG WINDOW ftCV 
I MINE LINESI 



TERMINALL is a hardware and software 
system That converts your personsH com- 
putef mto a state of the art commurnca- 
tions terminal. Tefminalf features simote 

■I 

eofinections to yotir compuief and radio 
plus sophisticated and rehable software. 

Simpaclty 

TERM1NALL was designed from the 
outset to be easy to connect to your redio 
and easy to use. Plug into yoyr receiver 
headphone jack and copy Morse Coda or 
radioteletype {flTTVL Plug into your CW 
key jack and send Mofse Code. Attach a 
microphone conneotor and send Baudot 
Of ASCII ftTTY using audio tOf»es (AFSKI 
That's all there is to ^looking «t up. 

The software is loaded into your connpuier 
from disk or cassette. Enter your callsign 
and the time and yoy will start receiving 
immediately. No settings or adjusimenis 
are necessary to receive Morse Code, it*s 
fully automatic -and n worksl You may 
type your message while receivkig or 
transmitting. 

You vwll be on the a<r, receiving and 
trananitiing in any i?Kide, in msmites. As 
we said. TERMINALL is simple 

More for your money, 

■ TERMINALL has the flTTY termJnat 
umt - demod and AFSK ~ built m This 
results m a lower total cost. 

■ Fantaatie Morse recaption. Six 

stage aetjve filter demodulator copies the 
weak ones. Auto adaptive Morse 
algonthm copies the sloppy oftes. Receiv- 
ed cod@ ^Q&ed dt3p4^ed on status IJrue 

■ Outstanding documentaticr^. Pro- 
fessionalJy written, 90 page user manual 
contains step-by-step instructions. 

■ Bwh In, separate, multi-ttasa, ao- 
tiv« filter aiTY and CW demod utatora. 
No o=h3se lock loops. BTTY demodulator 
has 17(3 and either 425 or 850 Hz shift- 



keyboard seteciable - ar^ uses either the 
panel meter or scope outputs for easy tun- 
ing. Copy the weak ones. Copy the noisy 
ones. Copy the fadrn:g ofjes, 

■ ByiJt in crystaf comrollad AFSK, 

Rock: stable for even the most demanding 
VHP or HF applrcatfoos. A must on many 
VHf RTTY repeaters. 

■ Built in tlO or 220 voFt AC power sup 

piy 

■ Built in paratlel printer driver soft- 
ware. Simply anacti a parallel ASCII 
printer (eg. the EPSON MX-SOI to your 
pnofec port to obtain hardcopy rn ail 
modes. 

■ Mutt! level displays - ai15vyfs examin- 
ing and editing oi historical texL 

■ Word ^vrapping, word mode editing, 
djddie, ignore carriage returns, user pro- 
grammable end of line sequence, ad- 
justable carriage width, multiple user- 
defined WRU. transmit delay {fixed, none 



TRS-«} NORMAL DISPLAY 






(Four line edit n^mdo* 
10 cresie tusl 1 



RCV 



iiihtt.'st reHi;rfViHl ctiiJd' 



XMT 




rtri,ini;miirif(.] ilatal 



RCV 



lifjcciuorj riiiral 



KMT 



RCV 



f 



Winilow 

Scrolls 

Up 



or ay to adaptivei, break mode and morel 

a The atMn one TIRMINALL design 

r > It great tor use on HF or VHF> Ham, 
Commerasi, SWL or MARSf SWL's: 
TERMINALL may be iumpered for etther 
426 or 850 Hz reception to copy news and 
weather services. 




IS Day Moiwy Back TNal PenoO Qf\ FacKKt 

S¥St«m Raqulremetite 

TERMINALL T1 Comrciyf>»Ci>tiLJns t^triimjit lof trw TRS-itt Moctel i RequH^ a MocM f TRS-SO, 16*; HAM snti 
I nvei If BASIC includia* sohw*e ots Cfa^atic^ a^d <^Jsk, EiS!i&mb1«<l «od teaiod hatclwy^rtt and an oxt«i|^ve ^b^Uc- 

li. !! mariual M9S, 

Ti RMS MALL 13 Comfnunicalkins terrrunai ki>f th« TRS-80 MoiM (II R«quirtrs a Model HI TBS^, liK hAU and 
Mr>.i^ Ht 3 ASIC k^iu^les saftiuare oo cmmi&as and disic^ Msemtited' Amf tested tianK^m ftncS an «Mt€4^8*¥e ^oetr^c 

rfftMlHAlL T2 CommurB^aibotis tefmjfui for ttie APPLE II Hsqutres an APPLt H Of APPL£ M PLus wsih 4®i; RAM 
/intj d4sfe. Scittware i* jwovkJed on tffek in POS 3.2 f&fmgt, Use MUFFIN utirnv lo convsrf w DOS 3 ,1 fo^^^ir rnrtiide^ 

aoFTware on ti\.^k, iiS.wimbitjtJ /:incf te^tod hardwaftr and an exfons^vu insimctiofi Trwartual, fWO- 

Add N.OO shipping y.p^S.fiQf. d«Uvery - CA fssic^t* ddd 6% »&i&^ Vm. 

TO ORDER (209) 634-8888 or 667^2888 

We are expefjencing tetephpne difficylties. 




Plea^ keep trying. 

/H4CROTRONICS, mc.^ 



1125 N. Golden Siate Bivd. 
Turtock, California 96330 



AppN is ^e^rnimUfi Tr&demsrh of Appto Camputur inc. 
Vyr. twifts 6 Siibor Jimfled vv(5rr8fify. 



The communJcations terminal that does it all\ 



NEW! 

DISK 

STORAGE &I 

RETRIEVAL 

Standard on 
Disk Ver^ori* 



t^See Usl of Adverus^rs on page 130 



73 Magazine • November, 1982 S3 



P^ESEL •- 



Introducing our Latest Model — NOVAK II 

SIMPLEX I DUPLEX 

^"TOPATCH 



MOYAX 




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nlqu* to that you cftn d^tBcl dial from your BulomobHe o* with 
your NT Irdin lh« tiackyard or poolipde — Automata cai^ly ... Easy 
mstflllalicsn transco overs, featuring so6id stata switcltinD. otfar best 
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FEATURES 


WMAX f 


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• T«d»iTi«^k ITT 

8qx 162 - Tudnun Rd. 
wattmoraiaid, N r i^4«Ci 
Of P»u«w 313-82i-27«6 ^ 7^ 



A synchronous counter 
feeds the clock input to all 
fhp-flops in parallel, and 
this results in a much faster 
operation. 

Fig. 12 shows a partial 
schematic for a synchrch 
nous binary counter. We ac- 
complish synchronous op- 
eration by using four flip- 
flops, with clock inputs tied 
together, and a pair of AND 
gates. 

One AND ^ate is con- 
nected so that both Ql and 
Q2 are HIGH before FF3 is 
active Similarly, Q2 and 
Q3 must be HIGH before 
FF4 is made active On a 
clock putse, any of the four 
flip-flops scheduled to 
change will do so simulta- 
neously. Synchronous 
counters attain faster 
speeds, although ripple 
counters seem to predomi- 
nate in most applications. 

Preset Counters. A preset 
counter increments from a 
preset point other than 
0000, For example, suppose 
we wanted to count from 

54 73 Magazine • November, 



5 10 (0101 j). We could preset 
the counter to 0101 and 
then increment from there. 

Fig. 13 shows a common 
method for achieving pre- 
set conditions for the jam 
input. Only two stages are 
shown here, but adding two 
additional stages will make 
it a four-bit counter. Of 
course, any number of 
stages may be connected in 
cascade to form an n but 
preset counter. 

In Fig, 13, the preset 
count is applied to points A 
and B, and both bits will be 
entered simultaneously 
when clock line CP2 is 
brought HIGH. Line CP2 is 
sometimes called the enter 
or jam terminal Once the 
preset bit pattern is erv 
tered, the counter will in- 
crement from this with 
every transition of clock 
lineCPl. 

Down Counters. A down 
counter decrements, in- 
stead of incrementing, the 
count for each excursion of 
the input putse. If the reset 

1982 



m^wT 



fFl 



i^ 



a 



4. 



Ff2 



4 



Ji ^ 



FF3 






* F4 



HH 



Fig. 14{bl This decade counter counts down, starting at the 
binary state 1001. 



ISOOta- 



l«#UT* 




Fig, 15. A counter can offer the choice of up and down 
modes by adding logic. 



condition is 0000, then the 
next count would be 0000 
— 1. or 1111 tit would have 
been 0001 in an up 
counter). 

We use basically the 
same circuit as before but 
toggle each FF from the 
NOT-Q rather than Q of the 
preceding FF An example 
of a four-bit binary down 
counter is shown in Fig. 14. 
Note that the outputs are 
taken from the Q outputs of 
the FFs but that toggling is 
from the NOT-Q. 

The preset inputs of the 
flip-flops are connected to- 
gether to provide a means 
to preset the counter to its 
initial (i.e., 1111) state. This 
counter is also called a sub- 
traction counter because 
each input pulse causes the 
output to decrement by 
one bit. 

A decade version of this 
circuit is shown in Fig, 14(b). 
As in the case of the regular 
decade counter, a NAND 
gate is added to the circuit 
to reset the counter follow* 
ing the 10th count. We de- 
tect the states where out- 
puts C and Dare HIGH, and 
then clear the two middle 
FFs. This action forces the 
output to 1001, (i.e,, 9,„). 
The counter then decre- 



ments from 1001 in the dec- 
imal sequence 9-8-7 -6-5-4'3- 
2-H}-9 etc. 

Up/Down counters. Some 
counters will operate in 
both up and down modes, 
depending upon the logic 
level applied to a mode in- 
put. Fig 15 shows a repre- 
sentative circuit in which 
the first two stages of a cas- 
cade counter are modified 
by the addition of several 
gates If the mode input is 
HIGH, then the circuit is an 
up counter, but if the mode 
input is LOW, then the cir- 
cuit operates as a down 
counter 

Conclusion 

This three-part series has 
offered you the basics of 
digital electronics. With 
this information, you 
should be able to conduct a 
large number of experi- 
ments, build most of the 
simple-to-moderate-diffi- 
culty digital projects pub- 
lished in this (and other) 
magazines, and even design 
a few circuits, From here, 
let me recommend that you 
begin to study microproces- 
sors and microcomputers. 
From the radio amateur's 
point of view, interfacing is 
very important. ■ 




Without doubt LR-1 is the repeater value leader! Compare its 

outstanding performance with any repeater — then look at 

its price/LR-l features include individual die-cast shielding 

of receiver and transmitter plus a separately shielded 

6*stage receiver prefilter for peak performance in 

harsh RF environments • Front panel metering of 

all vital functions • CW identifier • Symmetr 

hard limiting for clean natural audio • Low 

power MOS control logic • Even the 

cabinet is included — just plug in and go! 

The prfce? Only $1095 {US amateur club 

net). 

UNKING? The LR-1 is also available with 
control circuitry for Link Transceiver 
operation. Now link repeater sites with the 
flexible control capability you've always 
wanted, 

HIGH POWER? Our PA-75 power amplifier is the 
champion! Ruggedly built to give years of dependable 
operation in continuous duty repeater service. 





Mark 3C repeaters and controllers have no 
equal in performance. Both units feature 
auto patch, reverse autopatch, autodiaL 13 
Morse messages and a total of 39 func- 
tions. Both feature microprocessor control 
and both have been proven in the field from icy 
Alaska to tropical Brazil, A Mark 3C supercontroller 
can make any repeater a super performer. The Mark 
3CR repeater is in a class by itself. It combines superbly 
designed RF circuitry in one handsome package* It is 
without doubt the world's most advanced repeater! 



CALL OR WRITE FOR FULL DETAILS 

MICRO CONTROL SPECIALTIES 

23 Elm Park • Groveland, Massachusetts 01834 • Telephone (61 7) 372-3442 



^S^e List of AdverUsms on page 13Q 



73 Magazine • November, 1982 55 



Kenneth O, Wyatt WA6TJY 
SK ttectronics 
10672 Woodbury Rd 
Garden Grove CA 92643 



The Money-Maker 
Power Supply 

Need 12 volts for your transceiver? Save half the cost of a 
commercial unit by assembling this 25-Amp monster. 



Since the advent of solid- 
state transceivers, there 
has been the need for a sim- 
ple high-current 12-volt 
power supply. The power 
supply described in this arti- 
cle will produce 13.8 volts 
at up to 25 Amps continu- 



ous duty, All the parts 

should be readily available. 

First of all, you will need 

to determine how much 
current your transceiver 
draws, and at what voltage. 
Look up the current drain 
during transmit in your 




The completed 1 3,8-vo!t 25-Amp supply includes overvolt' 
age protection. 

56 73 Magazine • November, 1982 



owner's manual. For a 100- 
Watt radio, this may be 
about 20 Amps. Most trans- 
ceivers, whether they be 
small two-meter radios or 
large multiband 100 Watt 
HP ones, will have a voltage 
rating of 13 8 volts. This 
seems to be an industry 
standard. Thus, if you were 
to build a 12-volt supply, 
you probably would not 
achieve the full rated 
power output. 

Once the voltage and 

maximum current are deter- 
mined, you may choose a 
transformer. If it is not 
possible to find one of 
the proper ratings locally, 
then try requesting cata- 
logs from the following 
three companies. They all 
seem to have a large stock 
of transformers at good 
prices. 

• Delta Electronics 
PO Box 2 

Amesbury MA 01913 
[617)-388-4705 
f^ Fair Radio Sales Co. 
PO Box 1105 
Lima OH 45802 
(41 9>2 27-6573 

• Meshna 
PO Box 62 
Lynn MA 01904 
(617>595 2275 



A minimum of 13.3 volts 
rms must be supplied to the 
filter for a regulated out 
put of 13.8 volts. This is 
equal to the desired output 
voltage plus five volts divid- 
ed by 1 414. The current rat- 
ing, of course, must be 
greater than or equal to the 
desired output current. In 
my case, the required cur- 
rent was 22 Amps at 13.8 
volts. Thus, the transformer 
should have a current rating 
of at least 22 Amps and the 
secondary rms voltage 
should be at least 13.3 volts 
(13.8 + 5)/1414. I chose, 
from the Meshna catalog, a 
15-volt, 15-Amp autotrans- 
former. The stock number 
was T-658 and the price was 
eight dollars. 1 bought two 
of them to put in parallel 
for a total of 30 Amps. 
Meshna provides instruc- 
tions to convert these auto- 
transformers to regular 
transformers. This just in- 
volves rewiring of the at- 
tached terminal board. 

While you are looking 
through the catalogs, keep 

an eye out for some high- 
current rectifiers, large heat 
sinks for both the rectifiers 
and the pass transistors, 
and some "computer- 



grade" capacitors. See the 
parts list for the values. Al- 
so, please note that in most 
cases, the values in this 
power supply are not very 
critical. As long as they are 
close, they should work. 
Most of the smaller parts 
are available at Radio 
Shack. In these cases, the 
part numbers are shown as 
RS numbers. 

Circuit Description 

The circuit is a full-wave 
bridge rectifier with a linear 
regulator. See Fig 1 The 
voltage regulator consists 
of an LM317 which pro- 
vides base drive for the pass 
transistors. The LM317 is an 
adjustable three-terminal 
voltage regulator that when 
supplied with 27 volts on its 
input can provide an adfust- 
able 1.2-tch25 volts at 1.5 
Amps. In this case, we wilt 
be inputting 15 volts times 
1.414 or 21.2 volts (peak) 
from the rectifier/fitter 
combination. The regulator 
output voltage must be 1 3.8 
volts plus the base-emitter 
drop of the pass transistors. 
This will be13.8 volts -h 07 
volts, or 14,5 volts. 

Three pass transistors are 
used and they share the out- 
put current equally. There 
are several options for over- 
voltage protection and 
these will be discussed to* 
wards the end. 

Circuit Blocks 

Each section in the block 
diagram will now be de^ 
scribed When doing the ac- 
tual construction, build one 
block at a time and test it as 
you go. This will save de- 
bugging time and may pre- 
vent burned out parts. Build 
them in this order: 

1) Power transformer, recti- 
fiers, filter capacitors, and 
117-V ac input circuit. 

2) Vo ft age-regulator circuit 
(LM317). 

3) Pass-tranststor circuit. 

4) Output-protection cir- 
cuit 

Note that the power sup- 
ply can be used without any 



protection circuit but you 
must be very careful of 
short circuits. It is possible 
to lose the supply and the 
radio with one mistakel 

Transformer Circuit 

The transformer circuit 
consists of the line cord, 
fuse, pilot lamp, transform- 
er, rectifiers, and filter 
capacitor. See Fig, 2. Get 
yourself a Heavy-duty line 
cord for this power supply 
as you may be drawing 3 to 
4 Amps on the transformer 
primary. A three-wire cord 
is preferred and the green 
or ground wire should be 
connected to the power 
supply chassis. 

Use a 5- to 10-Amp fuse 

for the primary circuit and a 
snrtall neon lamp with built- 
in series resistor for the pi- 
tot lamp, I used a key lock 
for the On-Off switch to pre- 
vent "unauthorized" use. 

First, mount and wire the 
transformer(s) and line cord 
to the chassis. Connect the 
swrtch, pilot lamp, and fuse 
to the primary circuit. Then 
mount the rectifiers to the 
rectifier heat sink and 
mount the assembly near 
the secondary side of the 
transformer. Use at least 
number 12 or, better, num- 
ber 10 house wiring to wire 
all the secondary circuits, 
rectifiers, and pass transis- 
tors. The rectifiers must 
have mica insulators so 
they won't short out 
through the heat sink. Also, 
a layer of silicone thermal 
grease should be applied 
between the rectifiers and 
the heat sink. Extra grease 
should be wiped off after 
the rectifiers are bolted 
down, The rectifiers will 
have a voltage drop of 
about one volt at 25 Amps, 
so the power they must dis- 
sipate will be: 1 volt times 
25 Amps at a 50% duty cy- 
cle — 123 Watts each 
Make sure the heat sink is a 
large one. 

Next, mount the filter ca- 
pacitorfs) Use heavy gauge 
wire for the capacitorts), 
too. Now, recheck all wiring 



OVER -VOLTAGE 

PWOTECTIOW 

CIRCUIT 



ir7 

VAC 



f ciPicytT 



VOLTAGE h' 
ADJUST ^ 



-* 



P4SS 

TRANSlSrOfl 



T 



II* iNO 



Out 



VOLTAGE 

REGULATOR 

CIRCUIT 




OVEB- VOLTAGE 
ADJUST 



Fig. h Block diagram of the complete power supply. Each 
section is discussed separately. There are three options for 
the overvohage protection circuit 






ItT 
VAC 



^^ 



■^Tu^ 



0$\ 



m . 



~X CHASSIS 
GROUND 



/"^ 



Kjy 



*— # 



(rO VOLTAGE 
REGULATChR AMD 

TRAM^rofliiER cutcurrt 

4 * 




Fig. 2. Schematic diagram of the transformer section. The 
transformers are rated 15 volts at 15 Amps. 









VRt 






\. 


, » 


in 


LM3I7 


C4SE 




viw > - 


— * 










irwl* 
















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CASE PS 
OUTPUT 



BOTTOM VIEW 

LM3I7- VR^ 



GND 



Fig. 3. Schematic diagram of the voltage regulator. Rl can 
be 200 to 250 Ohms. Alt resistors are rated at 1/2 Watt. C3 is 
a ceramic and C4 is electrolytic. Both should be mounted as 
close to VR1 as possible. 



against the schematic. 

Make sure that the switch is 
off and plug the line cord 
into the wall socket. Be 
careful of any primary 
transformer connections as 
there wi 1 1 be 1 1 7 V ac there. 
Connect a voltmeter set on 
the 50- volt scale to the filter 
capacitor terminals and 
turn the power on. You 
should measure an unload- 
ed voltage of about 1 5 volts 
times 1 414 = 21.2 volts dc. 
Record your voltage read- 
ing, as we will be using 
it for some power calcu- 
lations later Make sure the 
On-Off switch works and 
that the pilot light works 

73 



with the switch. Note that 
since there is nothing con- 
nected to the filter capac- 
itor terminals to bleed off 
the voltage stored there. It 
might be wise to connect a 
1000-Ohm, 1/2-Watt resistor 
across the terminals before 
continuing. Turn the power 
off and use your voltmeter 
to verify that the voltage is 
near zero. 

Votiage Regulator Circuit 

Now start construction 
of the voltage-regulator cir- 
cuit. See Fig. 3. Mount the 
LM317 regulator to the 
chassis using a small TO-3 
heat sink. Use some silicone 

Magazme • Noveml>er. 1982 57 




in If i 






IFROM 




V(N > 



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6MD >■ 



Tgno" 



'MEfi 



116 









fif 



PROTECTION 
CliCUltt 



£5 
5000>iF 



■* GNP 



f/g. 4. Schematic diagram of the pass transistor section. 



IfROM 

POWEfi SUPPLY > 

OUTPUT) 



FUSE 



-> + J3 8V 



ens 



[dtOUNDl > 



->GROtlttO 



Fig. 5. Option 7 over voyage protection circuit 



P{)1IEII SUPPLY > 
OUTPyTJ 



(6flOi^ft&l > 




>-'iaiv 



> QKOttflD 



f/g. 6. Option 2 overvakage protection circuit 



grease and be sure to use a 
mica insulator because the 
regulated output voltage is 
connected to the case. To 
determine the power dissi- 
pation of this regulator, 
take the unloaded voltage 
reading you took earlier 
and subtract 14.5 volts. 
Then multiply by 1 ,5 Amps- 
In my case, the power dissi- 
pated was: (21 ,2 volts minus 
14.5 volts) times 1.5 Amps 
= 10 Watts. The heat sink 
must be large enough to dis- 
sipate this power. 

Mount the voltage con- 
trol pot on the top or the 
front of the chassis. Finish 
wiring the regulator circuit 
using point-to-point meth- 
ods. Here, you can use 
smaller gauge wire since 
the highest current will only 
be 1.5 Amps. Now connect 
the regulator input to the 



positive terminal of the 
filter capacitor Make sure 
that the negative terminal 
of the filter capacitor is 
grounded to the chassis. 

Temporarily connect a 
10- to 50-Ohm, 10-Watt 
resistor across the voltage 
regulator output to act as a 
load. Connect a voltmeter 
across this load resistor and 
set the voltage control to 
the midway point. Turn on 
the power and verify that 
you are getting about 11 to 
17 volts as the voltage-con- 
trot pot is adjusted. If the 
output does not vary with 
the control, double-check 
the wiring to the LM317. 

Pass Transistor Circuit 

If everything is OK so far. 
the next step is to mount 
the pass transistors. See Fig. 
4. Use large TO-3 heat sinks 



tfUQM 

oaTPUTi 



ruse 

294 



■^ ii 



JUMfEft 
FOR riORMAL 
'OPEn&TtON 



^^ CHT 



fOiOUAiDl > 



jNSfiA 



mi 



«12 
lOOH 






I? VOLT 

Tf ST LaU# 



0* 



4 «i3fiv 



01 



-> S»0(JNO 



Fig. 7, Option 3 overvohage protection circuit This version 
has an adjustable vottage-limit point 



and mount the transistors 
using mica insulators and 
silicone grease. Be sure to 
drill holes in the chassis for 
the wires to the transistors. 
Use rubber grommets. 

To determine the maxi- 
mum power dissipation of 

the pass transistors, you will 
need the unloaded voltage 
you measured across the 
filter capacitor. Take this 
voltage and subtract 13,8 
volts. Then multiply this by 
one third of the total output 
current In my case, the 
power dissipated in each 
transistor was (21.2 volts 
minus 13.8 volts) times (22 
Amps/3) = 54J Watts. 
Make sure that the heat 
sinks are large enough to 
dissipate this much heat- ! 
found that a finned heat 
sink of about 3'' times 4" 
times 2" was alright. 

After the transistors are 
mounted to the chassis, 
connect all the bases to- 
gether and run a wire from 
there to the voltage-regula* 
tor output. Small gauge 
wire is OK. Connect two 
0.1 Ohm, 5- Watt resistors in 
parallel and solder one end 
of this to one of the emit- 
ters. Connect the other four 
resistors likewise. Finish the 
rest of the pass-transistor 
sections using 10- or 12- 
gauge wire for the emitter 
and collector terminals, the 
connections to the filter 
capacitors, and to the out- 
put terminals of the power 
supply. 

Verify all wiring com- 
pleted so far and then con- 
nect a 1- or 2-Ohm, 200- 
Watt resistor across the 
power supply output (you'll 



probably have to combine 
several resistors to get one 
of these) Connect a voltme- 
ter across this load resistor. 
Turn the voltage control to 
minimum. Stand back and 
turn the power on! If all 
goes welL you should see a 
voltage of about 10 volts. If 
you are using a load resistor 
of 1 Ohm, then it is drawing 
10 volts/1 Ohm = 10 Amps. 
Try adjusting the voltage 
control and record the mini- 
mum and maximum volt- 
ages. These limits should 
bracket the required 13.8 
volts. Make sure that the 
maximum power supply 
voltage will not exceed the 
trip-point of the overvolt- 
age protection circuit. Oth- 
erwise, it will trip and you 
will lose a fuse. If you 
choose not to install a pro- 
tection circuit you may lose 
a radio! 

Outpuf-Proteclion Circuit 

It is surprising how many 
commercial power supplies, 
including those of various 
ham manufacturers, do not 
incorporate some form of 
overvoltage circuit. The foU 
lowing are three options 
that will work. All use some 
method of sensing an over- 
voltage condition and then 
clamping or "shorting'' the 
power supply output, thus 
blowing a high-current fuse. 

The first and simplest op- 
tion is to use a zener diode 
directly across the output 
See Fig. 5. Choose a zener 

voltage of about two volts 
over the normal power sup- 
ply voltage. The current rat- 
ing should be greater than 
that of the power supply so 



58 JSMagaiine • Novemfejer, 1962 



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the fuse, rather than the 
zener, will blow The cur- 
rent rating of the fuse 
should be between the 
power supply output cur- 
rent and the zener current 
rating. For example, for this 
power supply, choose a 25- 
Amp fuse and a 16- or 17- 
volt, 50-Watt zener. 

The disadvantage of this 
circuit is that it is not ad- 
justable and there still may 
be a chance that the zener 
will blow first before the 
fuse. This will still protect 
your radio, because when 
zeners fail, they usually 
stay shorted and this will re- 
duce the overvoltage to 
near zero^ 

The second option is also 
not adfustable. It is an SCR 
(silicon-controlled rectifier) 
crowbar circuit This circuit 
was published by Tom Law- 
rence WB4QLW in 73 Mag- 
azine, August, 1977. This is 
the one t used for my power 
supply because it is fairly 
simple and the parts are 
readily available. See Fig. 6, 

Here is how it works: As 
the power supply output 
starts to increase from nor- 
mal and reaches the zener 
voltage, the zener will start 
to conduct current. This 
current will produce a volt- 
age drop across the 1000- 
Ohm resistor and trigger the 
gate of the SCR. When the 
SCR becomes triggered, it 
witl latch on and short the 
power-supply output, thus 
blowing the fuse, It is really 
not necessary to heat-sink 
the SCR since the shorted 
condition will last only as 
long as it takes for the fuse 
to open. Make sure that the 
maximum adjustable out- 
put voltage is less than the 
zener voltage rating. 

The third and last option 
is similar to the previous ex* 
cept that the crowbar volt- 
age is adjustable. See Fig. 7, 
This circuit was published 
by Joel Eschmann K9MLD 
in 73 Magazine, August 
1979. 

The operation is the 

same, except the trip-point 
can be adjusted from the 

60 73 Magazine • Novenrber. 1982 



Parts List 



Item 



Qty. 



Hem 



C1,C2 


2 


34,800 ^F, 50 V ea,, or equiv. 


C3 




OJiiF 


C4 




I^F 


C5 




4700 ^F, 25 V 


CR1^4 




1N1185. 150 V, 35 Amp 


DS1 




Neon lamp w/series resistor 


Q1Q3 


3 


2N3055 or equivalent 


R1 




200 to 240 Ohms, 2 W 


R2 




lOOO^Ohm potentiometer 


R3 




1.5k, 1/2 W 


R4-R9 


6 


0.1 -Ohm, 3 W, or equivalent 


SI 


1 


SPST switch, 5 A contacts 


T1,T2 


2 


15 V, 15 A transformer or equivalent 



ly at /Approximate 




Cost 


Meshna 


$ 5.00 


RS272-0135 


$ .39 


RS272^1055 


$ 89 


RS272-1022 


$ 3 59 


Meshna 


$ 4.50 


RS272'0706 


S 2.19 


RS2762020 


S 5.97 


RS271'0135 


$ ,89 


Meshna 


$ 1.00 


RS271^25 


$ .19 


Meshna 


S 1.00 


RS275'0603 


$ 1.49 


Meshna 


$16.00 



Option 1 Parts 



CR5 



16 V or 17 V, 50 W zener (1 N3315) 



Option 2 Paris 



C6 


1 


100 ^R 36 V 


C7,C8 


2 


0.01 pF 


CR6 


1 


15 V, 400 mW zener (1 N965A> 


04 


1 


50-100 V, 16 A SCR (2N685, 2N1B44, 2N4441) 


R10 


1 


1000 Ohms, 1/2 W 


RVt 


1 


47 Ohms. 1/2 W 



RS272'1016 $ 0.79 
RS272'0131 $ 0.29 



RS27 1-0023 $ 0.19 
RS27 1-0009 $ 0-19 



Option 3 Parts 



C9, CIO 


2 


0.01 juF 


CR7 


1 


10 V, 400 mW zener (1N061A) 


Q5 


1 


50 100 V, 16 A SCR (2N685. 2N1844. 2N4441) 


R12 


1 


100-Ohm potentlometef 


R13 


1 


47 Ohms. 1/2 W 



RS272-0131 S 0,29 



RS2710009 $ 0.19 



zener voltage rating up- 
wards. To test this circuit 
break the connection be- 
tween the anode of the SCR 
and the positive output 
line. Insert a12''Volt lamp in 
series as shown. Adjust the 
voltage control for maKi- 
mum voltage and adjust the 
overvoltage control to max- 
imum (wiper all the way 
toward the ground end). 

Turn on the power sup- 
ply. The test lamp should 
be off. Start turning the 
overvoltage control until 
the lamp just turns on. Now 
turn the control about 1/8 
to 1/4 turn back in the other 
direction. This will add a 
small buffer zone. The 
lamp should still be on. 
Now turn the power supply 
off and then on again. The 
lamp should stay off. If the 
lamp is still on, try the ad- 
justment again- 

Try turning the voltage^ 



adjust control from max- 
Imum to minimum and then 

back to maximum. The 
lamp should remain off. If 
so, all is well Note that to 
turn off the lamp it is nec- 
essary to reset the SCR by 
momentarily turning off the 
power supply. When the 
crowbar is adjusted correct- 
ly, remove the lamp and re- 
connect the anode of the 
SCR back to the positive 
output. Now, when the 
overvoltage reaches the 
trip-point, the SCR will turn 
on and blow the fuse. 

Conclusion 

This completes the con- 
struction of the basic pow- 
er supply. If you wish, you 
may add a voltmeter and an 
ammeter. You also may wish 
to make and install a cover 
to dress up the chassis. 

The voltage adjust and 
overvoltage-protection ad- 



just controls may be placed 
anywhere out of the way. If 
you plan to use this supply 
in a dedicated application, 
the controls, once set, may 
be left alone. 

If you will be using the 
supply at various voltage 
levels, I would suggest op- 
tion 1 or 2 for your protec- 
tion circuit. That way, there 
will be less chance to mis- 
adjust the overvoltage con- 
trol and, consequently, less 
chance of blown fuses. 

So, enjoy your new pow- 
er supply and, at the same 
time, observe normal pre* 
cautions while using its 
high-current capabilities. 
Also, if you have a well- 
stocked junk supply, just 
think how much you will 
have saved over a commer- 
cial supply! If you have 
any questions, please send 
an SASE for a reply. Have 
funlH 



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THE TUMED / AHTEHHA 





^See Ust of AdvBftt&eri an p3g& 730 



73 Magazine • November. 1982 61 



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62 73 Magazine • November, 1982 



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w^See Ltsl at AOvctU^^rs on page i30 



TSMagazme * NovemberJ982 €3 



TVROQ&A:Partlll 

LNAs are expensive, but rolling your own 

is a losing proposition. 



Ken Rae WB0POP 
7J7 South Ctark^on 
Denver CO 80906 



What is the purpose 
otanLNAr 
The purpose of an LNA is 
to amplifv the signal col- 
lected by the feedhorn (ap- 
proximateiv 4 microvolts) 
to a usable level without 
adding any appreciable 
noise. 

Are all 120-degree LNAs the 
same^ 

No, they are not. Some 
manufacturers meet the 
specifications by just a bare 
margin, and other manufac- 
turers give you a 1 00-degree 
LNA yet call it a 120-degree 
LNA because it's sort of a 
stepping stone; you buy 
either a 100 or 120. There 
are some indications that 
manufacturers will include 
a 105-degree LNA as a step 
in progression of degrees 
Kelvin. 

/s the LNA's bandwidth im- 

porianU 

A few years back it was 
said that the bandwidth of 
many LNAs was too wide 
for TVRO application, 
Since then most of the 

64 73 Magazine • NQvefnber» 



manufacturers have in- 
stalled bandpass filtering to 
narrow down the amount of 

outside noise thai could 
come in. We don't want the 
whole world walking 
through ihe LNA. We would 
like to amplify the TVRO 
frequencies exclusively. 

Should I buy or build an 
LNA? 

I recommend that you 
buy your first LNA, I've seen 
only 10% of the people who 
try to construct an LNA ac- 
tually succeed and build 
something that is worth hav- 
ing. The disasters are horri- 
ble, so if you buiid an LNA, 
do it after you have bought 
one. Buy one, put your sys- 
tem up, get it running, and 
then go back and construct 
a low-noise amplifier for 
your own use and educa- 
tion. Then you can sell your 
commercial LNA for the 
same price you paid for it. 

How hard h it to build an 
LNA? 

An analogy would be if 
you went down and got 
plate-glass sheets and tried 
to grind your own zoom lens 
for a 35mm camera. You can 
just imagine the precision 
required to do this and to 
add optical coating that you 

1982 



would have lo put on for 
color pictures. Well, you're 
trying about the same thing 
when building an LNA. 

What is the most misunder- 
stood thing about building 
an LNA? 

That it is much like HF 
work or the old tube work 
clear back into the fifties, 
where you could simply in- 
sert a tube or transistor and 
turn the machine on to see it 
run. CaAsFETs have a very 
critical LC reactive compo- 
nent to their nature, and if 
these parameters are not 
met the transistor will not 
l^erform. Meeting these pa- 
rameters is difficult and 
takes a lot of time and me- 
ticulous work, There are 
people who claim that they 
can throw transistors into a 
strjpline design and learn 
the recipe for creating a low- 
noise amplifier In some 
cases this does work. But as 
a general rule, the miscon- 
ception is that you can put it 
together, turn it on, and it 
will run for you. 1 have never 
seen this first try, first serve 
situation. 

Why are LNAs so expensive? 

Profit is one reason, but in 

past years they've been ex- 

tremely expensive because 



20% of the LNA cost is ma- 
terials and the rest is labor, 
much of which is because a 
design engineer or a micro- 
wave engineer has to sit and 
tune the LNA for proper 
specifications. This is ex- 
tremely expensive at the 
rate of pay for engineers. 
The common laborer on a 
construction test bed is not 
able to bring a low-noise am- 
plifier to specifications by 
simply plugging in the tran- 
sistor, soldering it down, 
and shipping it out. It has 
to be tuned with precise 
instruments. The prices are 
dropping now, however, and 
they have come down al- 
most two-thirds in the last 
3 years. 

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Yes, it will. You can take 
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/s a 60-rfS LNA better than a 
30<iBLNA? 

No, I wouldn't say so, not 
in natural use if the mixer is 
within the vicinity of the 
low-noise amplifier. If 
you're going to put your 
mixer inside the house and 
run 60-80 feet of coax or 
heliax to the mixer, then you 
need some extra dBs from 
your LNA and gain to pump 
the signal down the coax, 
but in effect they're equal in 
quality. A lot of people will 
think a 60-dB gain is better 
than a 30-dB gain. As far as 
the noise level goes, that is 
established by the first tran- 
sistor amplifier of the 
CaAsFET LNA, and there- 
fore stages added behind it 
do not improve the noise 
figure. They improve the 
ability of the low-noise am- 
plifier to push the rf further 
down the coax without get- 
ting back down to an un- 
workable level at the other 
end of the coax. 

My LNA works all right at 
night but is very noisy dur- 
ing the day, why is that? 

It sounds like you have a 
heat problem inside the LNA 
where the chip capacitor is 
separating and/or closing 
due to the heat and expan- 
sion of the circuitry. Nor- 
mally the day and night tran* 
sition is not noticeable on a 
TV screen unless you're a 
very particular person and 
see more sparklies during 
the day than you do at night 
But if this is the case, it's 
usually due to the tempera- 
ture of the LNA, and its cir- 
cuitry is failing during the 
day The other type of inter- 
ference that comes during 
the day is unassociated with 
temperature, light, or condi- 
tions of the sun spot cycles. 
The satellite noise figure is 
due to its position relative 
to the sun on its receiv- 
ing antennas and whether 
it's charging its batteries 
or not. And all these param- 
eters influence noise dur- 
ing the day 

One of the biggest clues 
to terrestrial interference is 
the fact that it's usually 



more predominant during 
the day than at night due to 
the fact that telephone traf- 
fic is a lot heavier during the 
day. The deviation is higher 
due to the volume of FM 
traffic that is coming out of 
the terrestrial interfering sig- 
nal and deviates further into 
the video portion of the 
band of the particular chan- 
nel that you're watching. 
Therefore, you'll notice the 
interference is heavier dur- 
ing the day than it is at night 
If around 9 or 1 1 o'clock at 
night, when telephone vol- 
ume drops off, the TV gets 
more and more clear, then 
you can suspect that you 
have terrestrial microwave 
interference, and 1 would go 
look for it with a spectrum 
analyzer at that point, 

What is a dc block and is it 
really needed? 

Yes, most of the commer- 
cial LNA manufacturers re- 
quire that the dc power for 
the LNA be fed through the 
coax from the center con- 
ductor—this being a plus 15 
to a plus 28 volts in some ap- 
plications. In order to put 
the dc onto the coax going 
up to the LNA and at the 
same time have the rf from 
the LNA coming down that 
coax, you must divorce the 
two from each other at the 
mixer A dc block is simply a 
capacitor, usually in the 
neighborhood of 1000 pF, in- 
serted into the signal path 
allowing the rf to go through 
but keeping the dc on the 
LNA side of the stripline. An 
rf choke in the neighbor- 
hood of 5.6 or 10 millihen- 
ries is used to divorce the rf 
from the dc bias line that 
comes from the house. This 
enables you to have just one 
cable going to the LNA, 

Do holes in the waveguide 
hurt anything? 

It depends on how large 
the holes are. If they're no 
larger than one-eighth to 
one-quarter inch, they don't 
have very much effect if 
there are only one or two in 
the waveguide. I have quite 
a few holes in the home- 



built waveguides that I've 
used and I can see no dif* 
ference whether 1 leave 
them open or cover them. 

Do waveguide flanges have 
to be airtight? 

The only reason that you 
would need an airtight or 
sealtight flange between 
waveguide joints is to make 
sure that you don't interfere 
with another system. If you 
have a high-power oscillator 
feeding down one of these 
waveguides or if you were 
receiving side interference 
from terrestrial microwave 
or something of this nature, 
then airtight flanges are 
needed. At the low level of 
signal that we are talking 
about, the normal com- 
pressed, bo I ted -together 
waveguides are extremely 
efficient. The amount of 
enhancement gained by 
goldplating, sealing, solder- 
ing, and shimming the 
flanges is nearly usefess. 
Moisture seepage or air 
seepage might be another 
consideration if you're hav- 
ing condensation problems 
inside your waveguide, but 
most waveguides are open. 
My waveguide is open and 
has been for three years. 

How much gain is necessary 
for a ''perfect'" picture? 

For a perfect picture, 
something in the neighbor- 
hood of 30-36 dB is usually 
needed. The LNA output 
must be sufficiently strong 
to drive the mixer stage. The 
mixer diodes, if not driven 
properly, will add apprecia- 
ble noise to the system. This 
dictates about 33<tB mini- 
mum. 

Why do some people use 
round horns and others use 
square horns? 

A long time ago it was un- 
derstood that you get an 
easier impedance match 
and less loss with a square 
horn, I'm not sure whether 
that is true, but square horns 
do have one distinguishing 
factor: The pick-up probe 
and the impedance match- 
ing tend to be consistent in 



single-mode operation. 

Hence the square wave- 
guide is heavily used in 
military and commercial 
applications. 

Circular waveguides col- 
lect an equal amount of E 
and H fields, these being 
perpendicular to each other. 
That is, when the wave en- 
ters the dish, the E and H 
fields are perpendicular. 
The E field is the electrostat- 
ic field and the H field is the 
magnetic field, therefore, in 
getting the maximum power 
transfer, you must have an 
equal amount of these two 
properties. 

The circular waveguide 
more readily matches the 
configuration of the circular 
parabolic dish, the spherical 
dish, and also the wayef ront 
you are trying to receive. 
The circular waveguide is 
therefore more receptive to 
the incoming wave than the 
square waveguide- In sum- 
mation, the circular wave- 
guide outdoes the square 
waveguide by approximate- 
ly 1 to 1,5 dB. However, the 
transition that you use may 
cause a loss of 5 to 1 dB, so 
you may not gain anything 
by going from circular to 
square, depending on how 
well your transition works. 

Why use a horn instead of a 
dipote? 

The dipole by itself does 
not have the gain. What you 
are trying to do is focus the 
waves onto the probe in the 
rear of the waveguide. This 
gathering of the waves is ex- 
tremely valuable when 
you're working with small 
signal levels of TVRO 

What is a scalar horn? 

A scalar horn is simply an 
rf choke that keeps the sig* 
nal from going over the out- 
side of the waveguide or 
feedhorn and traveling back 
out toward the satellite It 
also represents a sort of yagi 
antenna; a scalar horn's ribs 
reradiate the wave toward 
the center of the wavegu ide, 
acting as an electrical fun- 
nel that catches and shoves 
the wave into the mouth of 



66 73 Magazine • NoveTnber/1982 



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73 Magazine • November, 1982 67 



the waveguide The scalar 
horn applies most readily to 
a deep dish — low focal* 

distance'to-diameter ratio 
[F/D]. The horn must "look ' 
at a wider angle. The funnel- 
shaped horns are more di- 
rectional and are used with 
a flat dish. 

Why is the spherical^ihh 
horn so much larger? 

The focal point of a 
spherical dish is quite a long 
distance from the surface of 
the reflecting spherical and 
therefore a larger area has 
to he gathered in. It is as if 
you are traveling 12, 14, or 
even 32 feet away from the 
spherical antenna to catch 
the microwave signal. 
You're sort of like a catcher 
in a baseball game; you 
want to use a large glove to 
catch that little balL The fur- 
ther away you are, the more 
directional you want your 
view of the antenna. There- 
fore, the broader the horn is, 
the narrower the beam is. So 
you want to catch this nar- 



row beam, making the horn 
appear much larger m physi- 
cal size The diameter of the 
mouth is much broader than 

for a parabolic dish. 

What horn do you use on a 
,3-F/Ddish? 

On a 3 you would use a 
wide-angle horn such as a 
sawed-off waveguide, a 
sawed-off piece of 2-inch 
pipe^ or a rectangular com- 
mercial 229 waveguide. The 
waves spread very rapidly as 
they leave the mouth of the 
horn. This leads us to use 
the scalar horn as the best 
choice. 



Is a goki- or silver-plated 
horn better than a copper 
one? 

Gold or silver is better, 
but for all the cost of having 
the gold plating or the silver 
plating done, you will prob- 
ably increase the signal only 
a tenth of a dB. So it's cost 
prohibitive to do this type 
of thing. 



Are there any surplus horns? 
"Surplus" is not really the 
word because you can go to 
any plumbing shop and find 
a 2-inch diameter circular 
piece of downspout copper 
tubing — and that is your 
"surplus" waveguide. There 
are square and rectangular 
waveguides An abundance 
of them are being thrown 
out every month by AT&T 
into scrap yards where 
they're sold for scrap cop- 
per. (They knock off the 
brass fittings on the ends of 
the flanges for brass scrap.) 
There are probably tons of 
this tying around all over the 
United States. 

How thick should the walls 
of the horn be? 

Thick enough to with- 
stand abuse such as from 
dropping it or from wild 
weather In mounting it, you 
might bang into it, so you 
don't want it to distort readi- 
ly with normal handling. 
Something like 24-gauge or 
28-gayge copper is the thin- 



nest you should use to make 

it rigid. 

Can you use PC materia! for 
the horn? 

1 don't like to use PC 
board material because you 
solder to only one side at a 
time, leaving only thin cop- 
per to hold the corners to- 
gether Bracing it on the out- 
side takes extra work such 
as putting brackets around it 
to hold it together. General- 
ly speaking it will work rea- 
sonably well, although I 
think there's easier material 
to work with 

V\ here can / buy a horn? 

That, I wouldn't know. 
Most horns can be built 
readily out of sheet copper 
drawn out on the kitchen ta- 
ble, cut with a pair of tin 
snips, folded, and soldered 
together, just as you would 
fold up cardboard to make a 
box for Christmas wrapping. 
Most of the amateur en- 
thusiasts construct their 
own horns. ■ 






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73 Magazine • November, 1982 69 



The Sound of Silence 



Beep!! Your TS-180 is off the air, Charlie. 



Tony RuGpp H&9BLU 
ffang$tT. 73 
CHSISJ Ruemkng 

Switzerisnd 



The TS-180 contains a 
very effective swr pro- 
tection circuit. If ever the 
swr exceeds a given limit, 
this circuit imnr^ediatefy 
cuts off your transmission 
and lights the LED. This 
state is held until you (or 
the VOX) release the trans- 
mit button. 

When transmitting CW, I 
very seldom watch the rig. I 
rather "see" the letters and 
words passing by while star- 
ing at a hole in the air. Sev- 
eral times I did not realize 
my transmission had been 



cut off, but I learned it im- 
mediately when I returned 
to receive and heard my 
partner in another QSO 
wondering where I might 
have gone. My 40m and 
80m antennas swing in the 
wind and often exceed the 
swr limit for a moment 

The following very sim- 
ple modification guaran- 
tees gaining your immedi- 
ate attention whenever the 
protection circuit has fired, 
It simply steals the sidetone 
and even recycles the pro- 
tection circuit if you're op- 
erating in the VOX mode. 
It's an easy job to do (takes 
about 1 5 minutes and costs 
less than a dollar) if you fol- 
low the instructions care- 
fully: 



Prepare a diode (1N4146 
or equivalent) and a piece 
of insulated wire [length 
about 50 cm). Strip one end 
and p re-tin it 

1) Remove the eight 
screws which secure the top 
cover, 

2) Lift the cover slightly 
and unplug the speaker. 

3) Remove the cover en* 
tirely. 

4) Locate the protection- 
circuit LED above the digi- 
tal frequency display. This 
LED is mounted on the LED 
unit The leftmost pin on it 
is labeled PRL and a blue 
wire is soldered to it. 

5) Make sure no other 
wires are touching that pin, 
then solder the prepared 
wire to it. 

6] Bend the wire 1 .5 cm 



behind the pin to the left. 
Bend it to the rear again af- 
ter another 3 cm and follow 
the edge of the PLL assem- 
bly to the rear of the rig, 

7) Bend it to the right 
again and cut it 2 cm from 
the CW key jack. 

8) Strip V* cm and tin it 

9) Now carefully place 
the wire in its proper posi* 
tion and tape it close to its 
end to the chassis. 

10) The CW key jack has 
5 soldering lugs. Locate the 
one with the brown wire. 
{This wire leads to the STS 
pins of the i-f assembly.] 

11) Solder the anode of 
the diode to the lug with the 
brown wire and the cathode 
(ring) to the added wire. 

This completes the modi- 
fication. H 



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Fig. 1. 

70 73 Magazine • November, 1982 



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P.C- ELECTRONICS 2522PaK5onLa 



ne, 



Tom W60RG Maryann WB6YSS 



Arcadia, Cafifornra 91006 



was an open fuse. When the 
fuse v^as replaced, every- 
thing was normal; no other 
defect was apparent. 

This article describes a 

circuit which will detect the 
open-fuse condition, give 
the load and/or supply time 
to recover, replace the 
open fuse with a good one, 
and announce the fact that 
the reserve fuse is now in 
service. 

Fig. 1 shows the general 
circuit for a dc-powered 
unit. So long as the regular 

fuse. F1, is good, the heater 
element of the time-delay 
device is shorted out by it. 
Should F1 open, the heater 
appears in series with the 
load After a delay period 
for the thermal device to 
operate, the TD switch con- 
tacts close and power is ap- 
plied to the gates of SCRs 1 
and 2. SCRl conducts and 



SCR1 



places F2 in the main load 
line. If the load now is 
capable of proper opera- 
tion, F2 will hold, restoring 
the equipment to service. 
The TD heater is again 
short-circuited, so it resets. 

SCR2 may be used to ac- 
tivate a small oscillator, 
e.g., a SonalertTM or other 
type. This modulator can be 
made to signal, via an rf car- 
rier, that the main fuse has 
failed and that the system is 
in the backup condition. 

The modulating system 
may be a periodic beep or a 

continuous tone. The Sona- 
lert device can give local 
aural notice, as well as 
providing electrical modu- 
lation. 

A relay arrangement 
might also be employed, 

with the relay coil across 
the main fuse.B 



F2 







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72 73 Magazine • November, 1982 



Fig. 7, Dc-operated circuitry. 

Reader Service for facing page ^24- 



SANTEC I ST-144/>tP 





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W9VS, 



«• 



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M SET 



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OFF OH 






m 



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a Santec to get: ■ memory channels which store stdndard repeater 
offsets for instant recall ■ less than 10 ma drain in reccrve to conserve 
power while you're monitorins ■ extremely wide power options of 0.1 
V;*! 1.0 W Of even 3.5 W for varying conditions ■ an accurate 24 hour 
clock for instant reference ■ and a full two year extended sers^ice plan 
which no one else will match. 

When you get a Santec, you also get: ■ the widest frequency range of 
any handheld ■ odd offsets other than ^600 kHz ■ variable step sizes 
in bandscdo ■ a 500 ma battery with charger ■ a fuU six digit t?ack- 
lighted LCD display for full frequency readout plus the memory channel 
number ■ the easiest keyboard entry of any handheld ■ eight modes 
of scan, search, manual control and open scan ■ the ability to change 
batteries without losing memory data ■ easily programmable bandscan 

a frequency lock switch on the keyboard ■ an automatic low 
battery indicator ■ and much more. 



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Memory Backup 


YES, CapacitarKC 


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Search Mode 


VES 


NO 


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5-100 kHz 


5 or 10 kHz only 


5 30 kHz 


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Quick Change P^k 


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yOLf MAy SEHD A DUPLICATE Of THIS FORM. 



No Smoking in the Ham Shack 

Overvoltage kills solid-state finals. Protect yours for $1.00. 



fohn I iapham, !l N7/jf 
47W Wth Nl 
Semie WA SBIOS 

This two- or three-corn- 
ponent addition to a 

power supply will give the 
experimenter a visual indi- 
cation of an over-voltage 



condition and do it for much 
less than the cost of a meter 
(see Fig. 1). All that is re- 
quired is a low-power zener 
diode, an LED, and (possi- 
bly) a low-wattage resistor. 

For example, in Fig 1, the 
unregulated voltage is 18 
volts. Since a voltage-regu- 



NEW 



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925 South Ninth 
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LOCATION 



ii^ais 



lator failure could occur if 

there were a collector-emit- 
ter short, there conceivably 
could be 1 8 volts at the pow- 
er supply output. Suppose 
the load can't safely operate 
at that potential for very 
long. By choosing the right 
zener, the experiment- 
er can have an inexpensive 
visual indication of this 
condition. The mathematics 
are simple! 

Remember Ohm's Law? E 
= IR, For this example, a 
zener is chosen which will 
reduce the 18 volts by the 
1.5 to U volts which are 
used to turn on the LED: 
V,e«.r ^ 18-17 = 163 
volts. In a normal output 
voltage condition, the 
zener will not conduct and 
the LED will not turn on, 
but if the output rises to the 
breakdown value plus the 
LED conduction value, the 
LED will light. But suppose 
you don't have (in this case) 



•9 



^PICetJkA.T£& 




Fig. 7. R1, ZD1. and LED1 
comprise the monitor dr- 
cuit 



a 16-vott zener Maybe you 
only have a 13- volt zener. 
What then? 

WelMSV -(13 V + 1.7 
V) = 3.3 V. What is going to 
drop that 33 volts? Remem- 
ber that resistor? Now you 

can use it. The resistance 
must equal that 3.3 volts 
divided by the current 
through the conducting 
LED, in this case 02 Am- 
peres, Using Ohm's Law we 
get: R - E/l or R = 3.3 
volts/. 02 Amps = 165 
Ohms. This value of resis- 
tance is then placed in 
series with the LED and 
zener to drop the excess 
voltage (see Fig. 2), 

If the voltage is required 
to be monitored exactly, 
then a meter is the better 
choice. But if an absolute 
over-voltage value is the 
only concern, then this cir- 
cuit could be utilized for 
around $1.00. It could be a 
bargain. I 







Fig. 2. The correct value for 



74 TSMagazine • November, 1982 



? PORT APE ATER® 



$ 1 79.00 assembied I^ 1 00 A $99,00 asscmbied 

unit INSTANT REPEATER .^ ^ ^^^'''^ 

cwrS^"™°" ANY BAND ANY MODE tV'^ "'ditf *"' 



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capability 

"An InBlant 



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RTTY SCOPE 



NEW 



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At Last! An RTTY Tuning Scope! 

And who else but HAL would bring you such a practical 
solution to the RTTY tuning problem. If all you have is 
flashing lights, you know how difficult it can be to match 
your transmit frequency with that of a received RTTY 
signal. The RS2100 RTTY Scope ends these problems 
with an accurate display of the received signal (both sig- 
nal amplitude and phase). The RS2100 is a matching com- 
panion for the CT2100 Communications Terminal and 
may be used with most HAL and other manufacturers' 
RTTY equipment. An internal loop supply is included. 

• X-Y tuning scope indication 

• 1" diameter green phosphor CRT 

• Front panel focus, intensity, and position controls 

• Internal 200 VDC, 60 ma loop supply 

• Two loop keying circuits (high voltage or 
optical isolator) 

• 3-1/2" X 8-1/4" X 10-3/16", 9 lbs net, 12 lbs ship- 
ping 120/240 VAC, 50/60 Hz power 

• Scope indicator works with CT2100, DS2050, 
DS2000, CWR685, CWR6850, CWR670, 
CWR6700, ST5000, ST-6K, ST-SK, and more 

• Loop supply works with CT2100, DS2050, 
DS2000, CWR685, and CWT16850 

Write or call for more details. See the RS2100 at your 
favorite HAL dealer. 

HAL COMMUNICATIONS CORP. 



BOX 365 

URBANA, ILLINOIS 61801 



217'367-7373 



Don't Be Left Out in the Cold 
with the Russian Woodpecker 

GET A 

MOSCOW 

MUFFLER™ 

Another first from AEA. The 
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available, the WB 1 for use with com- 
munication receivers and WB-1C for 
use with alt popular transceivers. 




This extremely useful accessory is 
designed for direct insertion between 
your receiver (or transceiver) and the 
antenna. It is both MORE EFFECTIVE 
than l.F, type blankers and requires 
NO MODIFICATIONS to your receiver! 
The unit operates from a 1 3 VDC ± 2 
VDC power source at less than 575 
mA. (AEA AC wall unit AC-I will 
operate the blanker.) 

The bianker works well on both CW 
and SSB modes that are being in- 
terfered with by a woodpecker. Con- 
trols on the front panel include: four 
push button switches, a synchronize 
control and a width control The WB-1 
also features a low- noise untuned 
broadbanded 6 db gain pre-amp which 
can be selected with or without the 
blanker enabled. The WB-IC uses the 
same circuitry but includes a carrier 
operated relay (COR)- This provides 
protection to the receiver section dur- 
ing transmissrons from the attached 
transceiver. 



For more details, write for our latest catafog or 
visit yoyr favorite dealer. 



^ 



Prices and Specifications subject to change 
witiKHit notice or (it>l)gaf<(in. 

ADVANCED ELECTRONIC 
APPLICATIONS, INC. ^2 
P.O. Box C-2160, 
Lynnwood, WA 98036 
(206) 775-7373 
TeJex: 152571 AEA INTL 

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See List ol Aijvertiseri on page 130 



73 Magazine • November, 1982 75 



Tempo MARSer 

Get the S-7 off those crowded ham channels. Expand your 
coverage above and below the amateur band. 




Edimn fong VVB6/QN 
Sif*r\ el res Corpora t ion 
&! J t. Arque^ Avenue 
Sunriyvafe CA 94(^87 



Fig, 1. The Tempo S-1 transceiver. 
76 73 Magazine • NovembeM982 



The Tempo S-1, intro- 
duced about two years 
dgov remains as one of the 
most popular VHF synthe 
sized transceivers. This is be- 
cause of its compact size, 
durability, reliability, and 
performance. This article 
will show that with some 
simple modifications, the ra- 
dio's bandwidth can be ex- 
tended to 140-155 MHz, 
thus covering MARS, mobile 
telephone, fire, police, etc. 
Although some degradation 
of performance occurs on 
the band extremes, no mea- 
surable degradation was ob- 
served within the amateur 
band. The few components 
and items needed are listed 
in the box. 

The techniques presented 
here can be applied to sim- 
ilar transceivers such as the 
Icom IC-2A, but are much 
more complex with micro- 
processor-control radios 



such as the Kenwood TR- 
2400 and Santec HT-1200. 
Although the unit is capable 
of transmitting in the com- 
mercial band after the modi- 
fications, only authorized 
persons should do so. In ad- 
dition, the modifications are 
not FCC -approved. 

S-t Background 

The block diagram of the 
S-1 is shown in Fig 2 The 
master oscillator is in a 
phase-locked-loop configur- 
ation so that only a single 
base crystal (6.82666 MHz) 
is used for the reference os- 
cillator This oscillator is fed 
through a programmable di- 
vider chip (NlS'-lOa). Initial 
ly, this divider spans 
N= 800-1 600, giving the S-1 
144,148'MHz capabilities. 
For example, the following 
divisions give the divider 
outputs and operating fre- 
quencies shown: 



Division 


Output 


frequency 




{MHzJ 


(MH^) 


N-SOO 


i.ii 


144 


N=1000 


i,M> 


145 


N = 1200 


2,00 


146 


N = 1400 


2J1 


147 


N-1600 


266 


146 



NlS-103 does not directly 
divide the reference oscilla- 
tor because NIS-105 con- 
tains other circuitry. The 
output signal is then mixed 
with the 431 -MHz crystal 
oscillator If the output of 
these two signals is summed 
and is fed through the vco 
consisting of the 2SKb1 and 
then tripled via the 2SC1 764, 
the output of the vco be- 
comes 1 M.30 MHz The vco 
generates the sum signal di- 
rectly producing a clean sig- 
nal as opposed to tapping 
the signal off the mixer 



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4F AM^ 

2SA952 
SSC;343 
2SA733 


< 


























LOCAL 05C 
10 245 






SauELCH 
HO 5 -102 










25C1675 















REF /05C 
4096 



Mix 



THUWewtiEEL 
SWITCHES 



CRTSTAj. [ 
43 iM^f 



t 



AMP 
2SC202E 



AHP 
2SC^02& 



AMP 

?SC202« 

Ofl 

2$C£4«r 



f fg; 2. B/ocfc diagram of the S4 



pwn/4MP 



Sf»K« 



ANIXNMA 



^^ 






4rCi49 







ffl 



i^ 






RBO 

4rK 



C7T 



TTTT 

T T 

^^ * 

FROM DIP SW4TCH 



43 J MNt \ 46 43SMH± 



fig. J, W/f/ng coniiguraiion ahowing the switching of the two 
crystals. 



m 



RZ9 

100 



01 



OS 




C34 

2Tpf 






i* 



'T^ .00 l-F h' 



L4 






R3a 



y77 



iOOpF 



/h 



^h 



R31 
IM 



T, 



T^ 




' TO 09 






! 



.^ 1^ f}33 



05 
ISV50 



I 
\ 
jTO 0<Z 



f /g, 4. Schematic of the vco. The only point at which the 
varactor diode can be connected is between C31 and C30 
since the dc voltage will not disturb the circuit 



JT 



* 10 ov 



/h 



O.I^F 



/h 



Oli^F 



A I* 



R2' 
2 2 OK 



I 



Dl' 

IN5I98 



/7f 



TO sa 



C3» 

iSo»r 



?20pF 



ffl 




fig. 5. Hookup of the varactor dicxie and how it is switched in Fig. 6. Mounting of the varactor diode. CI ; and R1 ' on the 

and out of the circuit. receiver board. 



73MBga2ine • November J982 77 




Fig. 7, Four-position switch mounted on the back of the trammitter board 




Fig. 8. The back of the transceiver showing the placement of 
the Dtp swirck 

78 73 Magazine ■ November, 1982 



(2SC1b75l which will have 
spurious products within Ihe 
band of operation. The two 
signals are compared by 
NIS-1U5 and a correction 
voltage is sent back to the 
vco (More on phase-locked- 
loop techniques can be ob- 
tained from rioyd Gardner's 
Phase! ock lechniques, John 
Wiley and Sons, New York 
NY, 196b.) The signal is then 
fed either to the transmitter 
or receiver where 10 7 MHz 
is added on to it to obtain 
the 144.00 MHz shown in 
the (*xampte given above. 
For transmit olttsets of i bOO 
kHz, the crystal is 11 3 MHz, 
and for -600 kHz, the 
crystal is 10.1 MHz 

Extension to 140-150 MHz 

The S-1 can easily be ex- 
tended for operation from 
140-150 MHz with minimum 
effort and no extra compo- 
nents. The programmdbilitv 
of N I S-1 03 is capable of 
N =0^2000, VVfiat prevents 
this atliun is not the elec- 
tronics but the mechanics, 
Henry Radio is obligated to 
allow the radio to transmit 
only rn the amateur band. 
This is done by placing rub- 
ber stoppers on the MHz 



section of the thumbwheel 
switches. With the unit re- 
moved from the housing, 
ttie three-section switch sep- 
arates ea.sily. On the switch 
furthest to the left, there are 
two rubber stoppers. Re- 
move these and repack the 
switch Coverage is now 
available from 140-150 
MHz. Because of the var- 
actor-tuned circuits in the 
transmitter and receiver, 
degradation in performance 
IS minimal With a dummy 
load into a Bird wattmeter, 
Iransmit flower is still 13 
Watts, and sensitivity is be- 
low 1 uV at the new band 
edges. No degradation was 
measurable within the ama- 
teur band 

Generally speaking, there 
IS limited activity below 144 
MHz, but from 14a 1 ^u) MH/ 
there is military, MARS, pag- 
ing, and other action. 

Extending the S-1 to 155 MHz 

Mos t pe ( J p 1 e w o u I d a gr ee 
that 148-150 MHz is not 
where the major activity oc- 
curs. However, from 150-1 55 
MHz, there are mobile tele- 
phone, paging, fire, police, 
ambulance, and other activ- 
ities. A practical method of 
alternating the frequency is 
to change the 43.1 -MHz os- 
cillator crystal (X-2) to 
46.433 MHz. This crystal wilt 
switch the synthesizer range 
to 150-160 MHz With direct 
readout. Unfortunately, the 
vco is capable of locking up 
only to 155,00 MH/ (This 
limit will vary from unit to 
unit.) 

To switch the two crystals 
in and out of the circuit, re- 
move X-2 and place it where 
the private line (PL) circuitry 
normally would go. Using 
RG-178 ti/U [or RG-174, 
which is bulkier), connect 
one end to the receiver 
while the other end goes to 
the two crystals (43.1 or 
46.433 MHz). For switching, 
a 4-po5ition SPST DIP switch 
can be used Since the crys- 
tal is grounded on the other 
end, it is best to disable the 
crystal by ungrounding it. 
Fig, 3 shows the wiring con* 
figuration. With the new 




k m ammoii ih pmoHiiimi 



• U.S. Made • Competitive Price • All Solid State • 12V DC • SWR Protected • 

• Broadband • No Tune Up • Full Break-in CW •ISO Watts PEP, SSB or CW Input • 

• High Dynamic Range • Excellent Sensitivity/Selectivity • Digital Readout • 

« 160-10 Meters Plus WARC Bands and MARS Coverage* • 



Front panef switching allows independent MODE and optional 
crystal filter selection, 

A passive double balanced mixer is employed in the receiver 
front end. This stage is preceeded by a low noise high dynamic 
range bipolar rf amplifier to provide good, strong signal perfor- 
mance and weak signal sensitivity. 

Accurate digital readout of operating carrier frequency is 
displayed to 100 Mz. 



A rugged, solid-state PA provides continuous duty In SSB and 
CW modes. A cooling fan (FA7) is available for more deman- 
ding duty cycles, sucTi as SSTV or RTTY. The PA also features 
very tow harmonic and spurious output. 

VOX GAIN, VOX DEI-AY, VOX disable. QSK. selectable AGC 
time constants, RIT and noise blanker seiection are front 
panel controlled for ease of operation. 

The TR5 is designed with modular construction techniques for 
easy accessibility and service. 



GENERAL 

Frequency Coverage: 1.8^2.0", 3.54.0, 7.07.5, 
10,0-10.5, 14.0^14,5, 18,0-10.5% 21.0-21.5, 
245-25.0% 28.0-28.5% 26.5-29.0, 29.0-29.7' MHz. 
(*Wltti accessory range crystal). 

Modes of Opera tk)n: U&b, LstJ. Ow. 

Fr«qu«iicy Stability: Less than 1 kHz drfft first 
hour. Less than 150 Hz per hour drift after first 
hour Less than 100 Hz Change for a :£: 10% [*ne 
voltage change. 

Readout Accuracy: ± 10 ppm ± 100 Hz. 

Power Requirements: 13.6 V-dc reQulated, 2 A. 
12 to 16 V-dc unregulated, 0.8 V rms maximum 

ripple, 15 A. 

Dlmertsions: 

Depth: 12.5 in (31.75 cm), exctuding knobs and 

connectors. 

Wf0th: 13.6 In. (34.6 cm). 

Height: 4.6 in. {11.7 cm) eMCludlrig feet. 

Weight 14 lb. 16.35 kg) 



TRANSMITTER 

Power input (Nominal): 150 Watts, PEP or Cw- 

Load Impedance: 50 ohms. 

Spurious and Harmonic Output: Greater than 40 
dB down. 

Intermoduiation DistorilorL: Greater than 30 d8 
below PEP. 

Carrier Suppression: Greater than 50 dB. 

Urtdesired SIdebarid Suppress ion: Greater than 
60 dB at 1 kHau 

Duty Cycle: 
S$t>, Cw: 100%, 

Lock Key (w/o FA? Fan): 30%, 5 minutes max- 
imum transmit. 

Lock Key (W/FA7 Fan}: 100%, 

Microphone Input: High Impedance. 

Cw Keying: instantanaous fufi breaK-in, ad* 
jus table delay. 



RECEIVER 

Sentltlvity: Less than 0.5 uV for 10 dB S+ N/M 
except less than 1-0 uV, 16-2.0 MHz. 

Selectivity: 2,3 kHzminimumat -6 dB, 4.1 kHz 
maximum at -60 dB (t.8:1 shape (actor). 

UKimate Selectivity: Greater than - 95 dB. 

Age: Less than 5 dB oulput variation for 100 dB 
Input signal change, referenced to age 
threshold. 

Intemiodulation: pO kHz or greater spacing) In- 
tercep! Point: Greater than dBm. Two-Tone 
Dynamic Range: Greater than 85 dB* 

14 Frequency: 5.646 MHz. 

I>f Rejection: 50 dO, minimum. 

Image Rejection: GO dB, minimum bebw 14 
MHz. 50 dB, minimum above 14 MHz. 

Audk) Output: 2 watts, minimum @ less than 
10% THD (4 ohm load), 

SpuHcus Response: Greater ihan 60 dB down. 



Model 7021 SL300 CW Filter 
Model 7022 SL50D CW Filter 
Model 7027 SLIOOO RTTY Filter 
Model 7023 SL1800 RTTY Filter 



ACCESSORIES AVAILABLE 

Model 7026 314000 AM Filter 
Model 7024 SL6000 AM Filter 
Model 1570 PS75 AC Power Supply 
Model 1545 RV75 Synthesized Remote VFO 



Model 1531 MS7 Speaker 
Model 1507 GW75 Keyer 
Modet 1556 NB5 Nolse Blanker 
Model 7077 Microphone 



R. L. DRAKE COMPANY 




DRAKE 



540 Richard St., Miamisburg. Gh^o 45342. USA 
Phone: (513) 066-2421 • Telex: 28&017 



AT LAST! 

This servrce will be available nationaNy. Lab tested & tfme proven 
modifications professionally installed in your amateur Handy- Talkie 2M, 
220, 440, MH2 transceiver by Henry Radios warranty technicians 

{KNOWN AS ^'ASW PRODUCTIONSl 




HAV£ ALL PL TONES AVAILABLE AT YOUR FINGER TiPS 



n, .*t.^.,fs| ttw {|$t HrtlGhl Hav'fc .' - ■■ ---3 

r. JJi PL Tones flUttiiyMU- at a momem s 

•2S Got yfxir own Pt? Send it lo us wlHi y^nir 

l-tof>ity^T{ilk» unit end we do the protesaional 
^aliNatbn for you. 

$55 We will install a hbw F1_ and <nlay the dip 
switch into the back cover of your Hendy^Titilhie 
r^BdylO ot^eratB. 

Send ua your liai)dy-Tiii>Mi« tifivt arwt a check tr 
monay of def phjs £C3 50 f or aiippinQ and riand- 
ingii^itfitelDAftW PRODUCTTONS, INC- 



F^ TEtiPO bmt« tfhQ c^ SMiilCh a ir^yed rrto 
the Push^to-Tdk bw The TEMPO S-lS w^ll 
rvM ttte dp swnlct^ inftay«d rrvtq 1fi« bad! oiver 

&4S we wiEl install a N EW B ATTI HY BEATE ft 
HI yourTEMPO d-1 , S'2. S-4. S-S READY to 
oparate. Your Nuw Satiary- Qoalor will iise ttie 
MHte Jack a& I he charger wrlti not now holes and 

rAfluCfltion circuttn built into unit ComB^ with 
CiQflr Lighter Adapter with mterriQJ fuse. 

CONTACT AiWPflOnUCTI ON S FOR SPE- 
CIAL MOD!FlCAT|0(^S YOU MAY WANT 
TO HAVE DONE. WE SPECIALIZE IN THE 
TEMPO HANOY-TALHIES. 



WE *flE AN OFWTCm. TEVf*Cr (B»«H STATION 
AUk WOfW GUAAANTEED FOfl aa JlAVS. $E7JD TOlfFt HAJfOT'TAUCtE AMD A CHECIt On IIDNEY 

ORDER TO 



*^164 



.^Wi 



PRODUCTIONS 



3305 pfco Btvct,, SsntB Monica 
CBlifomia Q04QS {212} B2B-92tO 



crystal switched in, it was 
found that locking ut the 
vco extend€?d only to 152 
MM/ The range can he ex- 
tended to 15^> MHz by tun- 
ing Tf), hut the lower portion 
of the 2-meter band woutd 
not lock. This is an yncom- 
promising situation, espe- 
cially with the new repc*ater 
subbdod and fire and taw 
enforcement between 1 S3 
andns MHz. 

Is it possible to have the 
best of both worlds? Yes. 



this js the reason for the 
4-position DIP switth rather 
than a two-position one In 
order to extend the lock 
range ol the vco, a varactor 
diode was incorporated 

Some general rules must 

be clarified before pro 
ceeding to any physical 
modifications. First, remov- 
ing any compQiu'nts is out 
of the question. This is be- 
cause the S-1 uses flow- 
through solder The risk of 
damaging other compo 



Items Needed 

1— Crystal (same as for the AR-22C— X-3. 46.433 MHz) 

1— 4-position DIP switch 

6'*— RG'178 B^U coax or equivalent (RG-174 can be used but it 

is bulky) 
1—Varactor diode, 1N5148 
2— 1/e-Watt, 220k resistors 
2— 0.1-uF bypass capacitors 

The Tempo S-l service manual can be obtained from Henry 
Radio. 2050 S. Bundy Drive, Los Angeles CA 9O025, for $7.50 

The crystal may be obtained from Ace Communcations, 
Inc., 2832-D Walnut Avenue, Tustin CA 92680, for S2,00 



nenls is high Second, the 
varactor diode must be con- 
nected to a point where the 
dc voltage is isolated since 
the diode must be con- 
trolled by a dc voltage The 
schematic for the vco is 
shown in Fig 4 The node be- 
tween C3fl and C31 is the on- 
ly point at which a varactor 
diode could be placed. 

The 1N514« varactor di- 
ode was chosen because of 
its range, 47 pF (no voltage) 
and 14.7 pF (minimum val- 
uel with about 10-volts re- 
versed bias across it, A 22l)k 
(l/8-W*iiLj resistor was tit^d 
to Vcc to reverse-bias the di- 
ode. An additional resistor 
must be used to discharge 
the diode when the voltage 
is removed Bypass capaci- 
tor CI' was placed next to 
R 1 ' to prt^vent rf interfer- 
ence, and C2' was installed 
next to R2' the final config- 
uration appears as shown in 
Fig 5, 

In the 150-1 55-MHz area, 

the switch is closed, which 
reduces the capacitance on 
the varactor diode In the 
140-1 50 -MHz region, the 
switch is opened. The two 
additional resistors shfjuld 
be 1/8-Watt to conserve 
space, but there is roorti for 
1/4'WatL resistors, CV, Dl', 
and Kl" are t^Jaced at the 
bottom printed circuit 
board under the shield plate 
in parallel with C30, as 
shown m Fig. 6 This method 
is preferable to minimize 
lead inductance. R2' andC2' 
were mounted next to S3 
since its lead inductance is 
not important It is recom- 
mended that a freciuency 
counter and rf generator be 
available so that T5 can be 
optimized for maximum 
bandwidth. 

The uncommitted switch 
on the 4'position DIP switch 
can be used for subaudible 
tone or tone burst if desired. 
Mounting of \hv DIP switch 
is dune on back of the trans- 
mrt board, as shown In fig, 7. 
A square hole is made on 
the back of the S-1 to access 
the switch, as shown in Fig, 
8, Be sure lo define the posi- 
tion of the hole carefully so 



that the position of the hole 
will match the position of 
the switch 

Useful Hints 

Because the S-1 is so com- 
pact, rf tends to feed back 
into the critical sections of 
the transceiver. U was found 

that bypass capacitors (n 1 
ul ) installed in the supjily 
leads in both the receiver 
t^nii transmitter boards im- 
proved the PLL stability, h^ 
a general rule, do not solder 
the crystal case to ground 
This can break ihi.* vacuum 
st-al on most crystals and 
shift its Irequeiicy, and at 
times it may stop oscillating 
altogether However, clamp- 
ing the crystal to ground is 
permissilile and is recom- 
mend ihI Also, plaung a 
sheet of aluminum foil 
around the tjattery and then 
grounding it eliminates rf 
teedback into the touch- 
tPne^*'^M>*if' 

Results 

The original sfjecifica- 
tions ot the S-1 are un- 
changed In the low extreme 
(140 MHz) sensitivity is still 
bt*lo\% I uV, while at 155 
MHz it was observed to be 
13 uV. more than adequate 
tor most applications. The 
vco lost lock at 1 56 MHz but 
was extremely stable below 
155 MHz By tuning Tb, the 
upper or lower frequency 
t*xtremes can be extended 
but the overall bandwidth is 
aboLjt 1 5 MHz On transmit, 
at least 1,5 Watts was avail- 
able at all frequencies. 
(Remember: A dummy load 
must be used when testing 
on unauthorized frequen- 
cies J White switching from 
140-150 MHz to 150-155 
MHz, the unit must be 
turned off while ifte crystal 
is switched and then turned 
on again This is because 
once the vco locks to a cer- 
tain frequency, it is difficult 
to break lock lMmI relock 
again when there is a 3-MHz 
difference between the two 
oscillator crystals. 

The author would like to 
thank Glen folh of Signelics 
for the photographs, ■ 



80 73 Magazine • November/1982 



"We have intolerable 
spring generated RF noise 
in our mobile rig" 




ur antennas are lasting 
ss than six months on 
hese high vibration vehicles" 





i 


S^B^^^^ka 




a- 


^B 




V^'l .^ 1 ttf 


^Kl 1 /" »-« /Mt: ^ 


"^■■iB s 


f^ 


k. 




i"— r V 




> 




9^.^VJ 


#-^ 


;i 9 6 • • 


u 


ST 


1^ 


^te I^H^rfV '^1^ 


9 




^#41 


Be 


r 


- .^ 



lutionary 
shock mount 



ms. 



• DURA'FLEX" neoprene elastofner — first stgnlf fcant advance f n antenna 
shock absorption technology in 25 years. 

• Completely eliminates RF noise in radio systems generated by metal- 
to-metal contact with conventional steel springs. 

• Drastfcalfy reduces whip vibration which can damage or break steel 
spring equipped antennas on high-vibration vehicles or in off-road 
environments, 

• Solid brass adaptors molded into neoprena... braid totally isolated 
through center cavity. 

• Thoroughly Held tested in extreme environments of heat, cold, 

humidity, and abrasion. 

• Five models available for 2 meters, 220 MHz and UHF operations, 
rooftop, trunk lip and magnetic mounts. 



Installation problems? 
Try our unique Avanti 
capa c I live I y-cou pled 
on-glass mobile 
anienna. Mounts on 
gfass— no damage 
to vehicle. 




Don't advertise 
your mobile rigJ 

Try our disguise 
antennas for t>olh 
$ and 2 meters-.. 
\^ any vehicle! 



t;he ant;enna specialistss co 



the antenna spedalists co. 

a mem5er of Tlw Alien Group Ifw. 

12435 Euclid i<We , Cleveland. OH 44T06 

Canada: A. C. Simmonds ^ Sons. Ltd. 



^63 




1 



® "Striipflig of Oueilv" 

deeign Bolutions, 



Contest or rare DX - 
the world is waiting to 
hear from the new 
breed of HF operators 
whoMI have the power 
of a microcomputer at 
their instant command. 
Introduction of the 
Heath SS-9000 signals 
a new era in Amateur 
Radio communications. 
An era full of exciting 
promise. Challenge. 
And opportunity... 

Anticipating the future, the Hams 
at Heath have created a remark- 
ably advanced HF transceiver 
based on microprocessor logic. 
And with it. they open an entire 
universe of innovation and poten- 
tial to the serious, active ham. 

MORE WORLD HORIZONS 

In the SS-9000, Heath met a ma- 
jor design goal: provide the high- 
est -tech, most versatile trans- 
ceiver possible. Our objective? 
Nothing less than setting the pace 
for transceiver performance in the 
next decade. And transforming 
the whole state-of-the-art in ama- 
teur telecommunications. 

As a microprocessor-con- 
trolled, nine band (including 
WARC) Transceiver, the SS-9000 
pioneers the revolution in com- 




puter-enhanced hamshacks - 
with advanced design applica- 
tions yet to be imagined. At your 
command under direct, modem, 
RS-232 terminal or computer 
controL it could break all known 
records for station performance. 

MORE TOTAL TALK POWER 

Even without a command termi- 
nal. Heath's SS-9000 will be the 
best transceiver your club or QTH 
ever aired. The superbly sensitive 
front end is mated to a transmitter 
providing 1W QRP or 100W PEP 
output on SSB/CW/RTTY At any 
level, dedicated operators who 
appreciate the finest and expect 
great results will discover it to be a 
hot CQ and DX magnet. 

The SS-9000 features push- 
button up or down band scan and 



RIT with a rotary tuning dial that 
utilizes an optical encoder (plus 
quartz PLL-synthesized BFO, 
HFO and a VFO linked to sepa- 
rate readouts). This gives you 
digitally-precise tuning with 
±100 Hz resolution in 16 select- 
able scan rates. Our dual fluores- 
cent display is not just an ad- 
vance in panel design ,.. ifs a 
quantum leap forward in T/R/Tr 
flexibility! Now you can write, re- 
call and shift a total of 27 separate 
frequencies (3 per band) around 
the dual display and work simplex 
operation on one or two frequen- 
cies, split operation on different 
T & R frequencies or cross-mode 
on either or both displayed fre- 
quencies. The unseen frequency 
stored in memory remains avail- 
able for instant exchange and 



There's more for the Ham at Heath 






Heathkit 





Company 




display, offering you speed and 
advantage that was undreamed 

of until now. 

MORE MICRO CONTROL 

Harness the SS-9000 to a video 
terminal, ASCII teletype or home 
computer. You'll have an unbeat- 
able team to travel the airwaves. 
Using built-in ROM ( Read-Only 
Memory) commands, the Termina 
Interface within each SS-9000 
acts as a control/monitor with bat- 
tery backup to handle a wide vari- 
ety of tasks the user may define. 
This unique feature lets you write- 
in and display (or change) the op- 
erating and memory frequencies 
for each band, set T/R/Tr activity 
on each readout, toggle between 
and altemate either one freely with 
the memory frequency. 



Keyboard command 

also allows you to 

set and switch 

the band, mode, 

pass-band shift, 

baud and scan 

rates, plus switch 

to one of five 

band-matched 

antennas. One 

on-board F8CPU 

raises switching 

efficiency to the 

highest limit. 



MORE FOR 
YOUR MONEY 

' Try one for the most 

exceptional capability ever 
offered. More QSO action 
than you thought possible. And all 
for a lot less than you'd expect to 
Day Test-prove the SS-9000. See 
low if s perfectly matched to the 
PS-9000 AC Power Supply that 
has an in-cabinet speaker and 
two digital 12 or 24-hour clocks. 
Both units benefit from thermal 
and over-current protection with 
high VSWR cutback. Ahead of 
their time, the SS-9000 and 
PS-9000 are not kits. They come 
to you fully assembled, calibrated 
and aligned, with a one year lim- 
ited warranty. 



MORE IN STORE FOR YOU 

Your local Heathkit Electronic 
Center* is eager to demonstrate 
the SS/ PS-9000 Team - our first 
'intelligent' rigs. Ready for the 
future of Amateur Radio, they're 
here, today! Get a hands-on 
tryout at your nearby Heath Ham 
Headquarters. 

MORE IN CATALOG, TOO 

For complete details ^^..-^--f 
and specs, get a p^-^^- ■- 
copy of your FREE 
Heathkit catalog. 
Write: Heath 
Company Dept. 
011-954, Benton 
Harbor Ml 4902Z 



•Units of Werilechnoiagy Efectronics Corpo- 
ration m the U,S-. a subsidiary of Zenith 
Radio Corporation 

In keeping with Heath's ongoing policy of 
product impfovement, specifications are 
subject to change without notfce or 
obligation 



01 



^x'^ 



^ 



/ 



/ 



"% 



/ 



/ 



Mifce Richardson N5MR 
5467 PlAnta'in Cirde 
Orangevale CA 95622 



CW and the Apple II 

The simplicity of BASIC plus the speed of machine language 

equals a near-perfect Morse keyboard. 



There are many good 
programs floating 
around for the Apple II mi- 
crocomputer which will let 
one touch-type Morse 
code. However, CW isn't 
nearly as effective coming 
out of the Apple's itty-bitty 
speaker as it is coming out 
of your antenna. This arti- 
cle describes a very simple 
(and cheap!) interface for 
the Apple which should key 
most rigs. 

The key to this interface 
is the neat little game I/O 
connector that Apple has so 
thoughtfully included with 
your computer. This con- 
nector is an ordinary 16-pin 
DIP socket with the layout 
shown in Fig. 1J 

Although there are 16 
pins on this connector, only 
three of them are needed 
for this interface. These are: 
pin 1 for + 5 volts, prn 8 for 
ground, and pin 15 as the 
keying output 

CAME I/O C'DNNEGTOft 
top VIE* 
[F|?ONT EOfiE OF PC SOARiD) 




L0C4Tl0tV J 14 



I next took an ordinary 
16^pin solder tail DIP IC 
socket (16? at James Elec- 
tronics) and soldered wires 
to pins 1, 8, and 15 on it. I 
use this socket as a male 
plug, and plug it into the 
game paddle t/O socket 
whenever t get in the mood 
for CW. 

Pin 15 is designated out- 
put ANO by Apple, and is 



driven by chip F14, a 
74LS259. The Apple manual 
suggests buffering this out- 
put, and Fig. 2 shows the 
buffering circuit I used to 
key my Ten-Tec Triton IV 
transceiver. 

m is a single AND gate 
from a 74C08 CMOS quad 
AND gate {49? at Radio 
Shack). Q1 isa2N2222 NPN 



PH^ \ *3V 



PIN ti 



PIM S icN^ 




PIN I F^>- 



PIN 19 t*«5 



mn i ch€ 



PtH I ^^ 



wm ISUwq 



PIN B GH 



Fig. 7. 
84 73Magaiine • November, 1982 



KjjCtRCUlT w 
%r THANSCEIVEfl 



Fig* 2. 



cE>-C) 




OUT 



/fr 



Fig. 3. 



14 




^ 2200a 

IT 




OUTPUT 



oa 



^ 



g6 



Fig. 4. 



utility transistor no<F at Ra- 
dio Shack). 

There are other combina- 
tions of parts that work 
which may even be cheaper 
than this circuit. However, 
these are the first ones I ran 
across in my junk box, and, 
as the old proverb says, "If 
it works, don't fix it." 

One word of caution: If 
you use a quad CMOS chip, 
as I did, be sure to ground 
the inputs to the unused 
gates — otherwise the chip 
may malfunction. Thus, for 
the 74C08, you should 
ground pins 4, 5, 9, 10, 12, 
and 13, 

My Triton IV is an all-sol- 
id-state rig employing low 
keying voltages that a 
2N2222 can handle with 
ease. If your rig uses grid* 
block keying, a slightly dif- 
ferent circuit should be 
used — see Fig. 3. 

Q2 can be substituted, 
but should have a V^e great- 
er than the keying voltage 
employed in your rig. The 
2N5401 and the2N4888 can 
handle up to about 300 
volts. 

For a cathode-keyed rig, 
the circuit in Fig. 4 can be 
used- 

Q5isa2N4123,andQ6is 
a high-voltage, high-current 
silicon NPN power transis- 
tor such as the Deico 
DTS-801,-802, or-804. 



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73 Magazine • November. 1982 85 



The connoisseur of key- 
ing circuits may find the lat- 
ter two of these circuits 
very familiar. They are bor- 
rowed from )im Garrett's 
(WB4VVF) excellent article 
on the Accukeyer/ 

Well, so much for the 
hardware end — the rest is 
free! (I spent 75f for parts 
for my interface. Add an ex- 
tra buck or two if your rig 
requires one of the latter 
two circujtsj The only thin^ 
remaining is to add state- 
ments to your CW program 
which wilt tell it to turn the 
ANO output on and off at 
the right times. 

By POKE ing a into loca- 
tion -162% (hex $C058), 
ANO is set to zero volts. 
Conversely, by POKE ing a 
into memory location 
-16295 (hex SC059), ANO is 
switched to + 5 vofts, 

CW programs can vary 
greatly, but probably all of 
them, whether written in 
BASIC, assembly language, 
or machine language, will 
have one subroutine to 
send a dit and another sub- 
routine to send a dah. If 
your program is in BASIC, 
then the statement POKE 
-16296. should be added 
to your program as the first 
statement in both the dit* 
forming and dah-forming 
subroutines, Likewise, add 
the statement POKE 
^16295, as the last state- 
ment in each subroutine 
Also, it is a good idea to add 
the statement POKE 
— 16296, as one of the 
first statements in your pro- 
gram, so that output ANO 
will be initialized to zero 
volts each time the pro- 
gram is run. 

If your dit- and dah-torm- 
ing subroutines are in as- 
sembly or machine lan- 
guage, the following com- 
mands will work. Insert the 
command: 

AD 59 CO LDA$C059 

immediately before the 
command which starts the 
code element sounding. 
Likewise, insert: 
AD 58 CO LDA$C058 

immediately after the com- 



mand, which stops sound- 
ing the code element 

As a final example, here 
are a few details from my 
own CW program, which is 
based on "The Morse Mas- 
ter/' 73 Magazine, January, 
1979, p 114. A BASIC listing 
of the pertinent parts of my 
program is shown in Fig. 5. 

The Morse code is held in 
an array A$[P}, where 3s 
stand for dahs and Is stand 
for dits. As each letter is 
typed on the Apple key- 
board, the corresponding 
value in the array is re- 
turned. For example, when 
C is pressed, the value 31 31 
is returned from the array. 
The subroutine at 1 000 then 
peels off the digits one by 
one from the left If a 3 is 
present, the dah subroutine 
at 1300 is selected. If a1 is 
present, the dit subroutine 
at 1 200 is selected. 

My dit and dah subrou- 
tines are almost identical 
They each call the same 
machine-language subrou- 
tine at memory location 
16002. This subroutine is 
listed in machine and as- 
sembly form in Fig. 6. In 
hex, 16002 is written as 
$3E82. 

This nicichine-fanguage 
program is almost identical 
to the tone-generator pro- 
gram shown on pages 43-45 
of the Apple Reference 
Manual, Each time before it 
is called, two values must 
be POKEd into memory. 
The first is variable PP, 
which determines the fre- 
quency of the output tone 
through the speaker This 
can be any number be- 
tween and 255 fl prefer 96} 
and this number is POKEd 
into memory location 
16000 (hex $3E80). The sec- 
ond number required by the 
subroutine tells it how long 
the code element should be 
sent. In the dit subroutine, 
this is variable X, and, in the 
dah subroutine, I used vari- 
able T. This second number 
is POKEd into memory lo- 
cation 16001 ($3E81 hex). (I 
use X ~ 10 and T = 40 for a 
code speed of about 30 
wpm.) 



6 GOSUB 32000 

7 POKE - 16296,0 
10 HIMEM: 15999 

199 REM— MORSETYPER MAIN PROGRAM 

200 GETKS 

220 P = ASqK$) 

225 REM^PRINTS LETTER TO BE SENT ON SCREEN 

230 PRINT CHRS(PK 

240 GOSUB 1000 

250 REM— ADDS SPACE AFTER EACH LETTER 

260 FOR Q = 1 TO SP ; NEXT Q 

300 GO TO 200 

999 REM— MORSE SENDING SUBROUTINE 

1000 L = LEN( A$(P)) 

1005 FOR I = 1 TO L 

1010 R$ = M»D$( A$(P),I ,1) 

1015 !F R$ ^ "V THEN GOSUB 1200 

1020 iP R$ = ^^3" THEN GOSUB 1300 

1025 NEXT I 

1030 RETURN 

1199 REM— D!T SUBROUTINE 

1200 POKE 16000, PP: POKE 16001,X : CALL 16002 

1201 FORL = 1T0X:NEXTL 

1202 RETURN 

1299 REM— DAH SUBROUTINE 

1300 POKE 16000,PP : POKE 16001, T : CALL 16002 

1301 FOR L = 1 TO X : NEXT L 

1302 RETURN 

Fig. 5. BASIC listing. 



Notice that the first state 
ment in the assennbly-lar^ 
guage program is LDA 

$C059, which sets the game 
I/O output ANO to 5 volts. 
When the code element has 
alt been sent, the program 
branches to $3E99 where 
the command LDA $0158 is 
given, which resets ANO to 
zero volts before returning 
to the main BASIC program. 

Fig, 7 shows a BASIC list- 
ing which will POKE the 
machine-language subrou- 
tine in Fig. 6 into memory at 
location 16002 [hex $3E82). 
One of the first statements 
in my main BASIC program 
calls this subroutine before 
any other action is taken by 
the program. 



3E82 
3E85 

3E8e 
3E89 
3E8B 

3E8E 

3E90 

3E91 

3E93 

3E96 

3E99 

3E9C 



AD 59 CO 
AD 30 CO 
88 

DO 05 
CE 81 3E 
F0 09 
CA 
D0F5 
AE 80 3E 
4C 85 3E 
AD 58 CO 
60 

Fig, 6. 



LDA $C059 

LDA $0030 

DEY 

BNE $3190 

DEC $3E81 

BEQ $3E99 

DEX 

BNE $3Ee8 

LDX $3E80 

JMP$3E85 

LDA $C05S 

RTS 



Well, that's it in a nut- 
shell. If anyone has any 
problems, send me an SASE 
and I 11 try to help.B 

References 

1. Appfe il Reference Manual, 
January. 1978, p. 25. 

2. The Radio Amateufs Hand- 
book. ARRL 1977. p. 364-5. 



32000 POKE 16002 J 73: POKE 
32005 POKE 16005,173: POKE 
32010 POKE 16008.136: POKE 
32015 POKE 16011,206: POKE 
32020 POKE 16014,240; POKE 
32025 POKE 16017,208: POKE 
32030 POKE 16020.128: POKE 
32035 POKE 16023,133: POKE 
32040 POKE 16026,88 : POKE 
32050 RETURN 



1600339 : 
16008,48 : 
16009,208: 
16012.129: 
16015,9 : 
16018,245: 
16021,62 : 
16024,62 : 
16027,192; 



POKE 

POKE 
POKE 

POKE 
POKE 
POKE 
POKE 
POKE 
POKE 



16004,192 

16007,192 

16010,5 

16013.62 

16016,202 

16019,174 

16022,76 

16025,173 

16028.96 



S6 73 Magazine • November, 1982 



Fig. 7. BASIC subroutine for POKEing machine-language 
subroutine into memory at location 16002 (hex $3B82l 



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73 Magazine • November, 1982 89 



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Fig. 1. Schematic of the general-purpose, or^e-tC audio 
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together when my audio 
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good range of input levels, 
making it handy for many 
bench chores. ■ 



€1**^ 



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DEA1.ER INgumJES PmTED 



^ 133 






DERRy, rf,H. 0303S WARNER HILL 






90 73 Magazine • November. 1982 




stuck with a problem? 



TE-12PA 



OurTE-l2P Encoder might be just the solution to pull 
you out of a sticlcy situation. Need a different CTCSS 
tone for each channel in a multi-channel Public Safety 
System? How about customer access to multiple re- 
peater sites on the same channet? Or use it to generate 
any of the twelve tones for EMS use. Also, it can be used 
to access Amateur repeaters or just as a piece of ver- 
satile test equipment. Any of the CTCSS tones may be 
accessed wfth the TE-12PA, any of the audible frequen- 
cies with the TE-12PB, Just set a dip switch, no test 
equipment is required. As usual, we're a stickler for 
Iday delivery with a full 1 year warranty. 

• Output level fiat to within 15db over entire range selected. 

• Immune to RR 

• Powered by 6-30vc!c, unregulated at 8 ma. 

• Low impedance, low distortion, adjustable sinewave output, 
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• Instant start-up. 




67,0 XZ 


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127.3 3 A 


156.7 SA 


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107^ IB 


131.8 38 


162.2 5B 


203.5 Ml 


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167 J SZ 




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114.8 2A 


141.3 4A 


173.8 SA 




79.7 SP 


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118.8 28 


146.24B 


179.9 SB 




82.5 YZ 


imoiz 


123.0 3Z 


151.4 51 


188^ 7Z 





•Frequency accuracy, ±,1 Hz maximum -40'Cto +85*C 
• Frequencies to 250 Hz available on special order 
•Continuous tone 



TE-12PB 






TESTTONES: 


TOUCH-TONES: 


BURST TONES: 


600 


697 1209 


1600 1850 2150 2400 


1000 


770 1336 


1650 1900 2200 2450 


1500 


852 1477 


1700 1950 2250 2500 


2175 


941 1633 


1750 2000 2300 2550 


2805 




1800 2100 2350 



• Frequency accuracy, ±1 Hz maximum -40*Cto +8S*C 

•Tone length approximately 300 ms. May be lengtiiened, 

shortened or eliminated by changing value of resistor 



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THE AUTEK "QRM ELIMINATOR 



SJ 




Model QF-1A 
For SSB & CW 
$69.00 (+S4) 



1 15 VAC supply byilt^ Auxiliary Nqich r*- Four msin tllt«r 

In. Filler by<pt9»t<$ J^ts 80 to 11,000 H£l modes for any OB M 

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notchfts cani loucti. 



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(to an Incredibia 20 ^250 lo 2BO0 H^ 



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amplifiers for 
HT and XCVR! 




AUTEK pioneered the ACTIVE AUDfO FILTER back In 
1972. Today, we're siHI Itie englneermfl teadep. Ouf ne^A^ QF- 
1A Is \he latest example Us IMFINITELV WRlABlE Vou 
varjf seiectiv»iy TOO: i and frequency o*»er tho en lire disable 
audio range, tnts Pet^vou rejeci w nifties with dual notches 
{to 70 dBK or reject SSB rii&s anii splatter with a ryiiy ad- 
lustac^fe lowpaas plus au?t rH^lcli, Imagine what i^e NAf^ 
ROWEST CW FILTER MADE will due to QRM* HP rejects 
frequ#fi€iC3 Skins tHcead 80 d6 i wait tpeafter amp 



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Built-in 115 VAC supply 6y»x5x3Vj Two-lone grey siylmg. 
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•I-IO Watts Input 

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• 5 year warranty 

model: 

BI 016 ( 2 nn eters) 

TW In = 35W Out 



WORLDS RECORD KEYER. OVER 4000 DX QSO'S IN 2 DAYS! 

f^rotiat^ly Ihe most popular "pro fessi on ai' coritest keyer 
in uiss^ yet most owners me casual CW opierators Of nov- 
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your CQ. nar^e, QTH, etc. in seconds, 102* b<ts stores 
about 100 characters flatters, numbers}. Playback at any 
speed. Doiydesb memories, triggered cFock, repeat, corn- 
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V\/qrks with ^nf paddje. Sit back and relax while ^our MK-1 
calls CO and handles standard exohanQasS 

Optional menriQry ejtpander (ME-i) supanda any MK 1 to 
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Model MK-1 Keyer $104.50 

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low In = l60W0ut 



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IW In = 20W Out 



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lOWin = lOOWOut 



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Folds to 5' Package Mo Riflaiijii tieauired 
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mm 



92 73 Magazine • November, 1982 




* RTTY/CW 

Fop theTRS-SO 



* A Tf aOefTiaiit c^ the Tandy Corp 



ROM-116 

Now includes: 
•TEXT EDITING 

• RTTY PICTURES 

• SAVE TEXT TO DISK Detailed brochure avaitabh on request. 



1200 BAUD OPERATION. Not limrted to 1 tO baud 
because of timing loops, 60, 66, 75 & 100 
W.P.M. Plus 110. 150. 300, 600 & 1200 baud 
operations possible 

FLEXIBILITY OF OPERATION. Instantly cbange: 
Baud Rates; Program Mode (ASCII/Baudot); 
Program Status. 

SPLIT SCREEN VIDEO. Transmit & receive data 
displayed separately. 

REAL TIME. Automatic CW/ID without user in- 
tervention. Automatically v^.^^ 
updates at en4 o1 month VBr #>■■#%* %m 
or year. ^= CROUfl 

nkroProducfs 



CDthen features 
include: 

Two Serial Ports 

FourTeen Buffers 

Automatic CW/li) 

Transmit Control 

Seiective Call Feature 

Error Correction & Editing 

Wofd Wfaping 

Easy to Interface 

30 Day Unconditionat 

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Hardware Requirements: 

TRS-eOModellorlll16K 

EXTERNAL TERMINAL UNIT 

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Industry 

Marine VHP 

Scanners 

Amateur Bands 

CB Standard 

CB Special 

Microorocessor 

CallorWrrte *^^ 

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AllPhomm (613) 93€-2397 




Automatic Antenna Tuner 
Model CNA-1001 

Frequency Range; 3.5— 30MHz (Including 

WARC Bands) 
Power Rating: 500 Watts PEP 
Internal Dummy Load: 50 Watts/1 Minute 
Impedance Matching: 15-250 Ohms to 50 

Ohms Resistive 
Input Power Required for Automatic Tun©: 1, 5 

or 10 Watts (Set by rear panel switch) 
Tune-upTime: 45 Seconds Max. 
Power Requirement; 13,8 VDC/.2 Amp 

Write for complete specifications 

J, W. Milter Division ^^"^ 
BELL INDUSTRIES 

19070 Reyes Ave. ■ RO Box 5825 
Compton. Catifomia 90224 

(213) 537-5200 ■ TWX 910-346-6740 





ANTENNA ♦ 

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2 KW PEP J 
UPSSHIPPABLE 



R3 may be the per feci 
anreniui fur condomittiums, 
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Ijmiicd space siluation. It is h 
jjrcai antenna for hams wtio 
arc concerned a bom neat 
appearance and ma^ctmiim 
performance, 

Rl's M:lf supporting; radttiurr 
i^ only 21 fl-6*4m higli x tit 
.104ni wide at the bane* 
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for p\»rtabic. marine, field day, 
DX-peditions, or fixed 
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with rcnioie tuner. 

AVAILAULl THRUlXill 
Di:^ALi:RSU(>Rll>WlDl. 



^^#Ji%VN 



1» 



t^See Usi of AdvBFtisGrs on page 130 



CORPORATION 

THE ANTENNA COMPANY 

P.O. Box 4680 
Manchester. NH 031 OS USA 

Ta£X 953050 ^ io6 



73 Magazine * November, 1982 93 



Robert W. Baker WBICFE 
15 Windsor Drive 
AtCO N/ 08004 



Award-Winning Program 

Certificate hunters, cut your paperwork down to size. Let your 

Pet track your quest for excellence. 



Here's a simple program 
for the Pet that was 
designed to keep track of 
what states have been 
worked on what bands for 
5BWAS. for each fitate, the 
program records the call- 
sign of the station worked 
on each band (80. 40, 20, 1 5, 
and 10 meters). You can dis- 
play the entries, just the to- 
tals for one particular band, 
or the totals for all bands 



combined [mixed), The data 
is stored in a data file on 
cassette tape and takes 
about two minutes to load, 
save, or verify. The program 
also provides a way of 
changing or deleting any 
entry, if required 

The program was written 
to be flexible enough that it 
could be used for other 
awards records such as 
Worked All Zones (WAZ) or 



Worked All Continents 
(WAC). To change the pro- 
gram for another award, 
simply modify the values in 
lines 180-200 as required: 

AW$ = The 3-letter award name 
(WAS. WAZ, WAG. etc.) 

NE = The number of entries tor 
ttie award— must be 50 or tess 
due to Ihe current Pet display 
liTTiitations. (WAS - 50, WAZ = 
40.WAC = 6. etc.) 

ie$= Entry input question used 



in line 770: 

For WAZ you could use: 
tE$ = "ZONE(01-40r* 
For WAC you could use: 
IE$ = ''CONTINENT (NA, SA. 
EU, AF, AS. OC)" 
K$=The string of entry names 
each 2 characters long: 
For WAZ you would use: 

190 KS = "010203 20", 

200 K$ = K$ + '^212223 40", 

For WAC you would use: 
190 K$ = "NASAEUAFASOC" 
200 (deleted— not usedl) 



Program fisting. 



130 
2?d 



REil 

P^EM SV - ROBERT W, PmEP- W&^»iF£ 

REM 15 MlHD*iCH^ &RIVE 

FEW 



I 1 = 8 f^ 



JJE=5e lEt=-5TfiTE -I'-UTT^ fiSiBS£Vi'' 
=i:#iLtJC t lSFL&f*f H D [ L 1 N I ^ SI VL»«MWlfi(M T HJ#tS^^ 

■ JHimr tit^r^HTi^ ilt-PftP li-C'StTHT KUtVTVftMFWVUlMV" 






HH="lNTfHE/£> Ef=' 



ISO 
370 



no 

4310 
44^ 

4^£T 
4^e 

49e 
^m 

550 

"DUv 

706 

?ie 
r3© 



flREMf^" - -31- fiitf "f - fiWfiPC R€CC»li£' 

Go^is . . ___;.£. i ppim- fi = [wc- 

F^IMT' 1 w LOftif MTA ¥Wm TAPE* 

Ffl^Cr* 3 * VERIFV IiftTiH CiM TfiPt" 

F*F-lrfT" 4 - imllf^tZE WiT(S|- 

f'F-lHT" 5 = E(tTEP KfiTf^ -. til) D- CHANGE ■ DELET¥>*' 

PFJNT" e - rilSPLFiV BRTi^" 

PPIHI*' 7 = DlEfLFlV TOTFiL^." QCIEUII L4i© 

GET Fi (F Pf="" Tier* 3€e 

tr ft=°i>' THEN PRTMT R* OiS 

fmrr Pi 

IF fL~'0 ^HBI ON N OQJQ 4^.54€-'blA> ?VO>760^99e^ 12£6 

0»* 11 €j:jTO 4fce*42e*4£©,7W 

F1?lWT"lllMlTIiHtLIZE «s- LOW DATA FIR^T*' OOTQ 3^ 

REM LOftli IiflTA F^Ofl IRFE 

PRltJT"UIMSEFT " RUI - " IHPiJT TAPE" 
OPa* 1 I fef «t^+" , MTR" PPjtiT " fl?EFrDrH& DftTR* " 
fm H"J TO t€ li|FUTil.D**M. IF ST»0 THEN l«XT 
IF ST=^4 mil l*^€ THEII PfJ|Hl-:>#* D^T^ uaftDet tit" 
GOTO WL^ 

POI SfiVt fiftTft C»nO TAPt 

PPlMfUldSEF'T " liui." WT1=^UT TF(FE- 

OPEH 1 . 1 , I , AW* + MH AT A " Fi; 1 1 +1 " JWR III HG DFlT A ! " 

FCIP H=l TCI ffE PFmT#l.DI'.H> HEMT 
Pp I NT '■:»*♦ DHTft -SAVE I) **'f" GOTO 27© 

PEh VEPlPt' DATft m TAF€ WITH HEil 

FCItlT-MII«i^T -.fiWf. * T^f: TD VE^IfV* 

t^PEH l-l.#.RMf+"*MtA'' H>I»^-*yeP"tFvlHO OATO** 

FW H=l TO »C Hff^jTtt-Cf IF =T"^ »(D C*=DfS' Tfr£H nc>rr 

IF c,T-€4 AM& rta^C T1*H Pf 1UT":JI4# TmP£ BriTw VERIFIEI)^ ♦♦#" GOTO 276 

!F Cf ::iiJM4> THEM PFlHT" ISiWiTft Hi SPtATClK' " GOTO £7© 

PRINT '^aTAFE F'EhiJ EP-p'OF'B ST • ".ST ^GTO 



IL-i OOTO 27« 



276 



REM TMITIRLIZE ALL ENTRIES 

PR r f fT ■' nt LE RR I n& All lhw i es • " 

FOR rl=t Tu t4E Dt'N«^Et*Ef •£!*€*+€♦ #JEXT 
PRlHT->## r<^TA lMtTI^lC£[> ttt^ |t»I GOTO £79 



740 

760 
770 
780 
79 @ 
$0<^ 
310 

^9 

040 



060 
070 
880 

05*0 

910 
320 

^40 



PfJl ADD. CHh»C-E. PELEl^ Etn'RlE^ 

pf?im " ««" .IE*. " ^Bm^ * I NPuT F I i F ?f ^ 

N=e FOR Z-l TO a»^NE>-l STEP 2 11=^-^+1 
IF Rf'::-MIEli(.Kf,S.'*^ TH£N fJEXT GOTO 770 
iNPiJT^'lBflNP 'S0.40...20-l^-10> JMI'^ Pf 

l=-l IF R*=''S£'" THEN 1=^ 
IF Rj="40- J\mi I-lft 
IF ^% = ^ll^-* THEN l«5fl 
IF R»= t5^ THEN i«3t 
IF Rfs'lt*" T>CH t»40 

IF icd T>€w eoe 

PRrWF'«U*RENT ENTIh^' = 
IHPUT-'KAtL *.I»-DELETE.- 

IF LEK Ct>:vl0 THEN 86^ 

IF C**='^D'^ THEN Ct-E* 

Cf^LEFTIfC*+EJ. 10 I 1*-C* ♦RIGHT*'. fit rH>.4@> 

IF rtl tMEr* ?5i? 

&f =LEFTf r5*<H> . I >+C • 

IF i:40 TNEH B*»S# ♦RIGHT t^M<H*. 40-1 J 

&t^M'=Bi GOTO 770 



THEN 2m 



IF Ri=^"-^ THeH 770 



C* IF C*=-( 



im^ 7J^ 



360 
370 



R£n OlSPtAV DAfTA tV £AriIli/-rtlXEP 



mill" , B« 



IF 
IF 



1^11 
fO"tt" 



Rf^lNT-RECORA&i 



PftlMT". 



330 I«njT-i6AtlIl<5!0-40.20. 15. len-m^SI)) 
1000 1^0 IF E*='e©*' ThfcEH 1*1 

IF Bt-"40" THEN 
£f=r«-20" THEM 
Ei»"lS*' THEN 

IF Bt^M©" THEH 

IP U«0< ANL £1 
1060 f^It<T-:»i» ^.AMf-- 
1070 PRtHT*Wft# tf' 
1000 IF 1-0 THEH PPlHT*hIJ«3>" 
1030 IF t>0 THEH PPIHT B*." MTR^' 
1100 PI^IHT^m rV* ; 

1110 FCa? H=l TO £^ tF WMi T^H f^RIHT TftE^3>.iM% 

IF 1-0 THEH U30 

PRINT TAB<9>^"I M KID^^K*. 2*K-1/2>A" 'MlIDt(fl*<N>. I . 10>; 
U4& PRim" "MIEt^H. c2*N>+HE-l,5).*' " ;MlDi<D*0^+MHK 1 . 10* ; 
U^ IF H025 THEH RRIHT 
i\it^ HEXT K _^^_„__ 

1100 PI^IMT'flMV KEV«- FfiltfT* T0«- PRmT-COtfriHUE"* 
1130 FO^ S*l TO 41 STEI^ 10 C<«HlW<&i*«>-K,l0. IF 
1200 PRI«T TAB<3:"'*t "Itr&f'Kf >^««^1^2>,- *'CM, 
lil0 FOP K"! TO 41 STEP 10 Cr-HUkJ-rW^tMWJ^H. 10> 



101P 
1020 
1030 
1040 

1030 



111*0 
1130 



GOTO 115a 



GOTO 1390 
C*=€f t>«M HEXT 



IF c**ii THO^ NE>rr 



1220 PRIHT-* 

1230 

1240 REM ADD BAf'Ui igTftLS 

t250 

1^0 



MITif'H '2»H>+He-I.2Jr" -.C*p 



6t3T0 1150 



PRrMT'*«ftI>DI(4G 
1170 FOR K-t 
1230 FOR H-l 
12« IF TflDt 

1300 t€>rr I 

171C PPlTiT" 

F^IHT jPC 

F-PIHT 

PPIHT 

PRINT 
1560 PRINT 
J37& PRINT 

PRINT 



TO 6 T' :r=e NEXT S- 

TO HE T(0"=C* FOft 1=1 10 5 



Hp*T<! >*| 






T".$-'=T< ^ >+T<0.i 



SFC<U->-40 METE^ 
SPC<Hi.*^ HETEtS 

SPCKtl.:. iM5 METEFS 
SPC' iU."1<5 METERS 
£PC*?.J . "p|it 
ra I>EfF'E 
12.-?^ GET P J IF F** 

1400 GCiTO :^ 

1410 RftlKT-i = 



ED 



l?S© 



tfiNIrB. 



i£vT H 

•.Ta> 

*• iT*S.» 
■':Tt:4j 

^Tt<^> RRIMT 
TQ COt^TlHUEl* 



0OSU8 L4i0 



REtWW 



§4 73 Magazine • November, 19B2 



Bes^^f Service tor fsaf^ peg^^^ 



SHOWN ACTUAL SIZE 



FEATURES so i 
UNIQUE AND ' 
OF SUCH f 

SUPERIOR I 
COMMERCIAL- 
GRADE 

QUALITY, I 

THAT... 



M MODE 



U'Jf'^ u 



M"^7 



•oox 



PWR/VOL 



SOL 



STEP SCAN TONE 



Off 



Sl,AN 



ore 



IT CARRIES A 



1 



i ^ i CALL _ 9 ' WWR 

a|Ei|D a - 



YEAR LIMITED WARRANTY! 



i 














4 





• a MH2 COVERAGE. CAP/MARS BUILT IN: 142.000-149 995 

MHz an setecta&ie steps of 5 of lO kHz. COMPARE? 
- TINY SIZE: Only 2" H x 5 5'' W ?r 6 8" D' COMPARE! 

• MICROCOMPUTER CONTROL: A! the forefront of technotogy! 

• UP TO 8 NON-STANDARD SPLITS: Uliimale versatility for 
CAP/MARS COMPARE! 

• 16-CHANNEL MEMORY IN TWO eCHANNEL BANKS: Retains 
frequency and standard offset. 

• DUAL MEMORY SCAN : Scan memory banks either separately 
or logether. COMPARE! 

• TWO RANGES OF PROGRAMMABLE BAND SCANNING: 
Limits are qutckiy reset. Scan the iwo segments either separately 
or logether. COMPARE! 

• FREE AND VACANT SCAN MODES: Free scanning stops 5 
seconds on a busy channel Vacant scanning stops on unoccupied 
frequencfes 

• DISCRfMINATOR SCAN CENTERING (A2DEN EXCLUSIVE 
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• TWO PRIORITY MEMORIES: Erthef may be instant fy recalfed at 
anytime COMPARE? 

• NfCAD MEMORY BACKUP: Never lose the programmed channels! 

• FREQUENCY REVERSE: The touch of a single button m verts 
the transmit and receive frequencies, no matter what the offset, 

• ILLUMINATED KEYBOARD WITH ACQUISITION TONE: 
Unparalleled ease of ODoration 

. BRIGHT GREEN LEO FREQUENCY DISPLAY: Easily visiWe 



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• PL TONE: Opttonai PL tone unit allows access to PL repeaters. 
Deviation and tone frequency are fully adjustable 

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Once these three lines 
have been changed, the rest 

of the program should not 
have to be modified. 

The remainder of the pro- 
gram is very straightfor- 
ward- Line 220 ensures that 
the Pet is in the upper- 
case/graphics mode and 
defines the data (D$] and 
totals (T) arrays along with 
the blank entry value {t$). 
Lines 2bO-340 display the 
program '"menu " which al- 
lows the user to select the 
desired program function 
from those available Lines 
3*50-380 get the number of 
the desired function and 
check that a valid selection 
was made. Lines 400420 
then branch to the routine 
to perform the selected 
function, but the data must 
first be initialized or loaded 
from tape before any other 
function t cin be jierformed. 
This ensures thai the data 
matrix (D$) has been set 
correctly before attempting 
to use any values contained 
within it. tach of the avail- 



able functions is then per 
formed by one of the rou- 
tines in the remainder of the 
program. 

The first time you use the 
program, initialize the data 
to tiear all entries. Then en- 
ter each callsign for the ap- 
|)rupriate QSO on each 
band for each slate. You 
make the entries by first 
specifying the state to be 
entered If you hit 
^'RETURN" without making 
an entry, the program will 
return to the menu selec- 
tion. If the slate is not 
found (incorrect 2-letter 
code), you will be asked 
again for the band [BO, 40, 
20, 15, or 10 meters]- It 
Rt TURN" is entered with- 
out any data, you will be 
asked for the state again If 
an incorrect band is en- 
tered, you will be asked for 
the band ai^ain. 

When a correct state and 
band have been entered, 
the current entry for that 
state and band will be dis- 
played If you enter 



"RETURN" without any 
data, the current entry will 
be unchanged and you will 
be asked for the next state. 
\i you enter a "D" followed 
by "RETURN", the current 
entry w^ll be deleted (set 
back to periods). Any other 
data entered followed by 
"RLTURN" is assumed to 
be the callsign to be 
entered for that state on 
that band. If the callsign is 
longer than 10 characters, 
you will have to reenter the 
call sigh. All callsigns en- 
tered will have periods ap- 
pended to make them 10 
characters long before they 
are stored. The five call- 
signs for each state are 
stored together as one 
W-character string to save 
memory space. 

When all entries have 
been made, display the 
data on each band and 
c heck if rorrect If required, 
go back and make any cor- 
rections You also can dis- 
play the totals and check 
for the correct number of 



states on each band. Before 
stopping the program, 
make sure that you save the 
data on tape. It's also a 
good idea to take the extra 
time to verify the data file, 
to make sure it was correct- 
ly saved You might even 
want to save more than one 
CQpy on tape while you 
have everything in memory 
Now you simply load the 
old data file the next time 
you want to add, correct, or 
ex a m i ne any t h i n y . If you 
make any changes, don't 
forget to save the new data 
on tape For those who 
want to go even further 
with their award records, 
you could keep separate 
data files for each mode 
(SSB, CVV, RTTY, SSTV. etc.). 

To answer the question 
before it*s asked, for any- 
one too lazy to type in the 
program, I'll be happy to 
supply copies on tape for 
$2,00 each However, 
please send all requests di- 
rectly to me and not 
through the magazine ■ 



CUSHCRAFT 

A3 3 EJerneni Tnt^and Beam 
M 4 Elfrment TnJbam} Beajn 
A743 7 A 10 lAHz Am Qn Iot A3 
A744 7 & 10 UHl AcJd On for A4 
AV3 3 Band Veflicai ia20m 
4V4 4 B&no Verltcal l0 40Tn 
AVS 5 Bant* Vertical lO-SOrn 

32-19 Bocmer 19 Eiemeni 2m 

21 4 B Jr BoomeT 14 El^meot 2m 

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A1474 2M 4 Efemcr^t Antenna 

ARX IB t34 t64 MHj «ir*§D Ranger II 

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TBJ ThriiSi Bearing 

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5F 2 Se Wave ? Meier Antenna 1900 

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73 is a virtual encyclopedia for radio amateurs^ 
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73 Magazine • NovemberJ982 




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DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED 



149 



COMMUNICATIONS DIVISION 



f -f O II f fi//'h 

(We Speak\bur 
Language.) 

Backed by over 54 years of experience, Harvey 
continues to offer the broadest selection and finest 
service available for the amateur radio community. 
This experience has taught us that the ham needs 
special treatment and that is why Harvey has estab- 
lished a special division dedicated to the needs of 
the U.S. and foreign ham alike. 

One thing is for certain. A ham will never get the 
run around from Harvey, If we don't have something 
in stock, we say so and will order it for you— or— tell 
you where to get it. However we are sincerely dedi- 
cated to the ham community and, as a result, our 

expansive in- 
ventory means 
that more than 
likely, we will 
have what you 
are looking for 




mt^ 



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took, 

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CALLTOLLFREE: 

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Ask for Dou "Joe" Chin -KB2MU 




See List of Ad\ferfisefs on pag& f30 



73 Magazine • November, 1982 101 



mm 



Speed Demon 

How fast was that? Find out with this wpm display 

for Heath's 1410 keyer. 



Jerry Wayne Camphel! K4ZHM 
Rte. 4, Box 126 Berkley 
Nichotasvilh KY 40356 



In the following, 1 will de- 
scribe a digital display I 
added to my Heath 1410 
keyer to display the wpm 
setting of the keyer The 
same principle can be ap- 
plied to other keyers. 



First, let's look at what 
we need to calculate the 
words-per-minute speed of 
the keyer. The ARRL Hand- 
book gives the following 
formula for calculating 
code speed: 

words/min = dots/m in/25 = 
2.4 X dots/sec 
From the Heath 1410 
keyer manual, we see that 
for each dot generated 
(space included), the clock 
in the keyer generates two 
pulses. The clock pulse rate 
is twice the dot rate. If we 
measure the clock pulses 




WPpi(MiMia^H|*IW«Ha^BHMHMHIIM 



s^. 




instead of the dots, the for- 
mula becomes: 

words/min = 
1.2 clock pulses/sec 
Multiplying the clock 
pulses/sec by 1.2 is the 
same as measuring the 
clock pulses for 1,2 
seconds. 1.2 seconds is 72 
cycles at the 60- Hz power- 
line frequency; therefore, if 
we count the clock pulses 
for 72 cycles of the line fre- 
quency, we are effectively 
multiplying our keyer clock 
pulses/sec by 1,2. Thus, by 
counting the clock pulses 
from the keyer for 1,2 
seconds, we can read the 
code speed directly on the 
seven-segment displays. 

Referring to the timing 
diagram in Fig. 1, we see 
that by dividing the 60-Hz 



w- 



I. £ SECONDS- 
-7Z CYCLES - 



line frequency as shown 
(first by 6, then again by 6, 
then by 2, then finally by 2; 
see Fig. 2) we obtain a 
1.2-second gating pulse. We 
now have the means to time 
the keyer clock pulses for 
1.2 seconds and the count 
will update each 1.2 
seconds. The reset pulse 
clears the counters 0.6 
seconds prior to the count- 
ing interval. Send dots 
and/or dashes for over 2.4 
seconds, and the readout 
will display for 0.6 seconds 
the speed at which the 
keyer is set. 

Power, the 60-Hz line fre- 
quency, and, of course, the 
keyer clock pulses are all 
taken from the keyer. Refer 
to Fig. 3 and the Heath 1410 
keyer manual for the fol- 



h4- 



]C\ PIN 6 
\C2 PINS 

IC4 PIN & 

IC5 PIN 4 
llC4 ?\H 4 
IC5 PIN 3 



^MMJiniUMiniuiimimiiMJ 



60 Hi 



^6 



-6 



'2 



: -2 



GATE 



; PTESET 



The assembled keyer with the counter modification. 
102 73 Magazine • NovembeM982 



Fig. 1. Timing pulses appearing at various points in the cir- 
cuit 



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GP41 HITACHI 



TC1 109 RCA 



The completed counter board before mounting in the keyer 



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2115 AVENUE X, 
BROOKLYN, N.Y, 11235 



The counter board is mounted using right-angle brackets 
and the mounting holes ior the removed paddtes. 



lowing connections. The 
keyer clock pulse is ob- 
tained from point D on the 
keyer speed control- The 
60-Hz signal is obtained 
from either side of the 
secondary of the power 
transformer and ground. 
The resistor values shown, 
Rl and R2, are for the 
Heath keyer. A convenient 
source for the 5 V dc is the 
speaker lead that is con- 
nected to the 5 V dc supply. 

1 replaced the neon on- 
off indicator lamp with an 



LED. I then connected the 
inputs of the remaining 1/4 
IC5 to pin T2 of IC3 in the 
keyer, and the output to the 
LED; see Fig. 2. The LED 
lights up on the mark por- 
tion of the code character 

When sending code, the 
display of the speed wi 



vary. You are seeing the 
average speed at which you 
were sending in that 
1.2-second interval. 

T he re are several 
methods of housing the 
display. I use a Bencher 
paddle with my keyer, so I 



removed the keyer paddles 
from the keyer and took out 
the center post, I then 
mounted a red lens over the 
opening. The display and 
circuitry are then mounted 
behind the lens using the 
mountings for the removed 
paddle assembly. ■ 



I I 



c.c. 



7?/ 




U 
I f 



IC7 

4026 



ii- — * 



/ff 



SV^^- 



1/4 IC5 



TO IC5 PIN IS 
IN KEYER 



n-t^^ N 

Q~3 



GNOb- 



1 1 



7?, 




IG 



IC£ 
4QIB 



m 



IG 



H 



\% 



rc3 

40J8 



15 



? 



15 



t£. 



15 



i 



C.C. 



Ih 




IC6 
^03S 



!£ 



IC4 
4016 



\% 



15 



f77 



14 



1C5 

4oei 



15 



m 




60 rti«- 



&7k 



10 



% 



m 



r 



Fig, 2. LfD mark indicator 
for keyer output 

t^See List ol Advertisers on p&ge 130 



CLOCK*- 



Fig. 3. Code-Speed reader for the Heath 1410 keyer. 

73 Magazine * NovemberJ982 103 



Keyer on a Shoestring 

Hams are cheap and so is this keyer 
Big spenders will build the deluxe, two-chip version. 



toel R. Donaldson WB5PPV 
1 7 Fenwfck Drive 
Laredo TX 78041 



Most great keyers 
aren't very cheap, 
and most cheap keyers 
aren't particularly great. 
However, here's a fair-to- 



good one you can build for 
around $10.00 using ail new 
parts. If you've got any sort 
of junk box at all, it should 
cost you quite a bit less. It's 




TO 
TRANSMtTTER 



REVERSE (F 
NECESSAflt 



Fig. 1. One-chip keyer circuit The er]tire circuit must be isolated from the enclosure. R1, 
R2^30k or 50k '^stereo" imear taper dual pot. D1, D2, DJ — any silicon diode. Ql shown is 
a Radio Shack part number. 



S1DET0NE 
(OPTIONAL) 




150 



}^ 



3.2-40fl 



02 
21^^222 



Fig. 2, Optional sidetone circuit connects to the keyer at points A, B, and C 
104 73Magazln€ • NovemberJ982 



not iambic or self-complet- 
ing, it lacks contest memo- 
ries, weight control, and a 
few other bells and whis- 
tles, but it is simple, draws 
very little current, fits nice- 
ly into a small package, and 
is capable of sending good, 
clean CW. A keying tran- 
sistor and floating ground 
make it usable with just 
about every modern rig, 
and a sidetone circuit can 
be added easily if your rig 
lacks one. In short, it makes 
a good first keyer or a nice 
second circuit for the vaca- 
tion or QRP set 

As shown in Fig. 1, the 
whole keyer is built around 
a 74C00 quad NAND gate 
which is connected to form 
two independent osciHa- 
tors. The frequency of each 
oscillator is dependent 
upon a capacitor (CI for 
one, C2 for the other) and a 
resistor (R1 for one, R2 for 
the other). By simultaneous- 
ly varying R1 and R2, both 
oscillators can be sped 
up or slowed down, and a 
third resistor (R3) makes 
one of the oscillators run a 



fixed percentage faster 
than the other, thereby pro- 
viding a definite dash-to 
dot ratio. The output of 
both oscillators is con- 
nected to the sidetone (if 
used) and to Ql, the keying 
transistor, through D1 and 
D2, which prevent one 
oscillator from interfering 
w ith the other Q1 conducts 
whenever either oscillator 
is in the "on" state, thus 
keying the transmitter in 
step with the oscillators 

The side tone circuit (Fig. 
2) also consists of a 74C00 
connected as an oscillator. 
but with R and C values 
changed so as to produce 
an audio-frequency tone. 
The output of this oscillator 
is switched by Q2, which 
provides enough drive to 
power a small speaker* The 
pitch of the side tone may 
be changed by using a 
slightly different value for 
R4, The sidetone circuit 
connects to the keyer at 
points A, B, and C. 

I mentioned earlier that 
this circuit has a floating 
ground. As shown on the 
schematic, no connections 
are to be made to the keyer 
cabinet. This eliminates ex- 
pensive and hard-to-find 
reed relays, lowers power 
consumption, and side- 
steps the need to modify 
the keyer whenever a dif- 
ferent transmitter is used 
Also, it is suggested that 
you stick to a battery to 
power your keyer unless 
you are certain that your 
power supply is isolated 
from ground When con- 
necting the keyer for the 
first time, it may be 
necessary to reverse the 
two keyer output leads to 
prevent the transmitter 
from being keyed all the 
time (wrong polarity to Ql) 
After the correct way has 
been found, a connector 
can be soldered on. 

Adjustment consists of 

merely trimming R3 until 
the dits are about one-third 
as long as the dahs. Once 
this has been done, it will 
probably never have to be 

^See ust of Advert tsen on page t30 



done again, since this ratio 
stays about the same over a 
fairly wide range of keying 
speeds and battery volt- 
ages. However, if it is an- 
ticipated that several oper- 
ators of widely varying pro- 
ficiencies will be using the 
same keyer, it might be bet- 
ter to make R3 a front- 
mounted control or at least 
provide a hole in the 
cabinet for quick screwdriv- 
er adjustments. 

It seems kind of pointless 
to blow a considerable 
amount of money on a key- 
er paddle when the actual 
circuitry costs so little, so I 
would like to suggest a rath- 
er unoriginal but appropri- 
ately frugal alternative ll 
consists of a short piece of 
steel packing strap or hack- 
saw blade sandwiched be- 
tween two telephone 
switch or relay contacts 
The packing strap or blade 
is scraped clean of all paint 
in the contact area, and a 
piece of paddle-shaped 
Plexiglas'"^^ which protrudes 
through the front of the 
cabinet is bolted to one 
end. When the paddle is 
moved in either direction, 
the strap touches one of the 
contacts. The strap need 
not make a perfect connec- 
tion for the keyer to oper- 
ate, since the CMOS oscilla- 
tors will operate even with 
several thousand Ohms of 
contact crud The strips of 
phenolic that insulated the 
switch or relay before modi- 
fication are used in the 
same application; they 
make sure that neither the 
strap nor the contacts make 
an electrical connection 
with the cabinet. Fig. 3 
shows one possible arrange- 
ment for the entire keyer. 
including the paddle, 

Rf shielding for this cir- 
cuit is not too critical; the 
prototype worked fine with 
no case at the 100-Watt lev- 
el I used a 1- by IVa-inch 
piece of perfboard for the 
keyer circuit, and the side- 
tone was added as an after- 
thought on another smalt 
piece of board. A center-off 




-me FIST FIGHTER 



Using a strafght key or "bug?" TTien send your 
code witfi the Rst Rghter, and make it sound 
perfect. "Swing" and ragged edges are filtered 
out ar>d your dots and dashes are always timed, 
1 ;3, No new hand motions or special key need- 
ed, so )^u'If send code like a pro in no time. 
Great for novice or old-timer. 



Pnce: From S59.95 Blacksburg Group 

Contaa Bfacksburg Group for qq^ 242 

mofe fnformatjon. v j Bfacksburg, Vrrginra 24060 

^,,a XI 703/95^9030 



switch was used to control 
both the keyer power and 
sidetone, as the HW-101 al- 
ready has a sidetone built in. 
With the cost of amateur 
radio equipment what it is 
today, CW just has to offer 
one of the best potentials 
lor having a lot of fun with- 
out spending a lot of money. 



Vintage CW rigs abound on 
the used market, and a 
good QRP rig can be pur- 
chased new without going 
too far into debt. Costing 
about as much as a cheap 
microphone, this circuit re- 
flects the same spirit of fun 
on a shoestring. Use and en- 
joy. ■ 



[^=' 






® 



III |$I0E 






ftOAIlD 










u ^ 










PLEll'OLif 
PADDLf 






Fig. 3. Typi^^^l ^ffsngement of circuit boards, controls, and 
paddle. 

73Magazfne • November J982 105 



Paul M. D^mer Nlii 
2 Dawn Road 
NorwaikCTOaaSl 



I Got My Ticket! Now What? 

A look at what Elmer forgot to tell you. 



For many recently li- 
censed hams, trying to 
operate a new ham station 
is just as difficult as learn- 
ing the code or studying for 



the written exams. Anyone 
who has ever been involved 
a licensing class knows 



in 



people who have gotten li- 
censes and set up stations, 



Local Time 






Band 








60 


40 


20* 


15 


10 


6:00 am 












9:00 am 






DX 






Noon 






OX 


DX 




3:00 pm 


Locaf 




DX 


DX 


DXor 
Local 


6:00 pm 


Local/ 


Locai/ 


OX 


DX 


OX or 




Ragchew 


Ragchew 






Locai 


9:00 pm 


Crowded 


Crowded 


DX/ 
Crowded 


DX 


Local/ 
Ragchew 


MJdnigm 


Ragchew 


Crowded 


DX/ 
Crowded 







*lf allowed by llcensa class 

Fig. 1. "Besr be(" operating frequencies for a newcomer 
(1981-82). 



(NPUT 



RECtlVER 



TftftNSiilTTER 



OUTPUT 



COHTWOL 
UMIT 



I 



T^ANSillT 



TIMER 



Fig. 2, Typical repeater. 
106 73Magaiine * November, 1982 



but never quite made any 
contacts on the air. New 
hams have many questions 
about operating. The fol* 
lowing are some of the 
more common ones, 

/ have had my station set up 
for a month and have man- 
aged to make /ust one con- 
tact- How come? 

Let's assume your rig is 
working. The problem 
could be where and when 
you are trying to operate. 
For example, on a Friday or 
Saturday night, 80 and 40 
meters (Novice band) are 
jammed and just about 
everyone has a problem. If 
you try 10 meters and the 
band Is closed, you stili 
won't work anybody. The 
trick is to pick a band and a 
time when there are a num- 
ber of stations on, but the 
QRM is not overwhelming 
Try 40 meters in the late af- 
ternoon, 1 5 in the early eve- 
ning, or 10 on a Sunday af- 
ternoon (see Fig. 1). 

Should I call CQ or just lis- 
ten? 

Use common sense. If 
you tune around for a few 



minutes and don't hear any- 
one calling, you can try a 
CQ, but pick a quiet fre- 
quency and limit your CQ* 

Why limit it? I thought the 
traditional 3X3 or even a 
i X 4 was a good idea. 

Look at it from the listen- 
er's point of view- If I hear 
you calling CQ for a long 
period of time and get tired 
of listening to you call, I 
won't want to reply to you. 
If you are that boring with a 
CQ, think how boring you 
would be in a QSO. With to- 
day's equipment, just call 
'CQ CQ CQ de WA1WTB 
WA1WTB," repeat once, 
and then K. If there is no arv 
swer, you can always try 
again. 

you said to pick a quiet fre- 
quency. How can i tell if no 
one is using it? 

Assuming you don't hear 
anything, just send QRL or 
IE. On voice, say "Is this fre- 
quency in use?" If there is 
no reply, you are perfectly 
correct to assume you can 
transmit without bothering 
anyone 



Am I better off operating 
CW or SSS to start with? 

I am not sure what vou 
mean by "better off." As* 
suming license class is not a 
consideration (you have 
more than a Novice 
license), try operating both 
and see what you tike. Side- 
band initially takes less ef- 
fort to operate but the fre- 
quencies are more crowded 
during prime operating 
hours. You usually can do 
better with DX on CW with- 
out fighting everyone's kilo- 
watt- 

What if I want to join a QSO 
that is already under way? 

Lef s be very blunt about 
it. In some cases, you won't 
be welcome. Hams are a 
cross section of people, no 
more and no less. However, 
on CW, a simple "BK" is 
enough to be invited in. On 
SSB, ''May I join you? This is 
WAIWTB" or any English 
language equivalent is ac- 
ceptable. Be careful of us- 
ing "Break/' 

What is the problem with 
''Break?'' 

It used to be the normal 
and accepted way to break 
in but recently, especially 
on repeaters, "Break" or 
"Break Break" is used to in- 
dicate an emergency situa- 
tion when you want to 
transmit in a hurry. 

/$ repeater operation differ- 
ent from other types of 
QSOsf 

Yes, Almost every area or 
repeater is slightly differ- 
ent It is a good idea to lis- 
ten for a while before you 
get on a new repeater Al- 
most all are equipped with 
a timer which will cut you 
off if you talk for more than 
1, 2, or 3 minutes, depend- 
ing on the setting. 

What controls the timer? I 
reatty don't want to get cut 
off in mfd-$entence. 

Some timers reset as 
soon as the repeater's re- 
ceiver no longer receives a 
carrier. Others reset as soon 
as the repeater's transmitter 
shuts off. Some repeaters 



FREQUENCY 



TRANSMITTER 

Preselect Plate 

or 
* Driver 



TUNER/MATCHBOX 
Input L Output 

Cap Cap 



a7nn 














37Rn 














IfiM 














7000 














7050 














7100 














7150 














7M0 














?1(M>0 














71 inn 














21200 















transmit a beep tone when 
the timer has been reset 
(see Fig. 2). 

Why limit the time for trans- 
mitting? 

The primary reason is to 
force a pause between 
transmissions, and to do so 
often enough to allow any- 
one who wants to join the 
QSO time enough to trans- 
mit his call. In addition, it 
allows mobile stations to 
get into the repeater with- 
out having to wait any long- 
er than a minute or two. 

Do mobile stations have a 
priority? 

Usually yes — both on re- 
peaters and elsewhere. 
First they are limited by 
their motion as to how long 
they will stay in range. Sec* 
ond, they are more likely to 
have seen an emergency sit- 
uation or to need directions 
or other aid. Good proce- 
dure again follows common 
sense — let a mobile in 
quickly to find out if he has 
a problem. 

/ hear a lot about ^'feer- 
chunking'' repeaters. What 
is the story here? 

Kerchunking is a very 
common practice of press- 
ing your mike button to see 
if your transmitted signal is 
strong enough to bring up a 
repeater. Since it is a trans- 
mission without identifica- 
tion, it is technically illegal 
but it is also generally a 
worthless test. Quite often 
you can be on the fringe 
area of a repeater and be 



Fig. 3. Sample tuning chart. 

able to bring the repeater unless asked for or you 
up but be too noisy to copy, wish to indicate a problem. 



1$ there a better way? 

Sure. Key your mike and 
identify by saymg, "This 
is WBIAJC — is anyone 
around?" If you don't make 
the repeater, nothing is lost. 
If you do make the repeater 
and no one answers, it 
doesn't make any differ- 
ence since you won't have 
anyone to talk to! 

When I identify myself on a 
repeater, should I use pho- 
netics? 

With a little experience 
you will know the answer to 
that question for your own 
call, If it contains an F, S, or 
other easily confused letter, 
you can use phonetics, but 
it is not usually done unless 
the station you are talking 
to does not repeat your call 
correctly. The same holds 
true for signal reports — 
they are not usually given 



Which signal reports are 
usually given on repeaters? 
Q5 S9 does not seem appro- 
priate. 

Since the signal strength 
you are receiving is due to 
the repeater and not due to 
the station you are talking 
to, the best you can do is 
tell if you are copying OK 
(''full quieting") or noisy. 
Some hams will say "50% 
quieting" which indicates 
they are copying half noise 
and half signal, but this 
non-technical use of ''quiet- 
ing'' is a wild guess at best. 

What about reports on other 
bands or when you are not 
using a repeater? 

I suggest telling the truth. 
On CW, if you had a trans- 
mitter problem and your 
tone was not T9 or perfect, 
wouldn't you want the 
other guy to tell you? The 



SCAVE IN OCX 



KNOe 




ORIGIN At CALIBRATION 
MAFTK 



KNOB SKtRT 




SECTION OF 
aCL^-STJCK LABEL 



ADDf 
GALipnATIDW HARKS 




Fig. 4. Adding calibration marks to a skirt-type knob. 

73Magaiirre • November, 1982 107 



CAL1BRATI0«| 

MARies 




CUT FROM SELF -STICK 
LABEL ANG" PS-ACCO 0*1 
tOUtPM£KT PANEL 



fK»tNTEn TYPE 
KNOS 



Fig, 5 Adding calibration marks to a pointer-type knob. 




DiJUHY 
LOAtI 



Fig. 6, Step t ■ Tune up the rig into a dummy load. 



TO 
ANTCNNA 



HCCEiVER 



^=^ 



R X 



V 



ANTEAIMA 
TUHER on 
MATCHSOK 



-SET BRIDGE FOR 

R * ao 



Fig. 7. Sfep 2: Adjust tuner to provide a SO-Ohm load. 



ssime holds for asking the 
other ham to QRS or slow 
down. 

Frankly, I was hesistant to 
ask. Wont a request to QRS 
brand me as a beginner? 

Possibly, but we were all 
beginners once. Besides, 
what is the sense of sending 
*'W (1 have solid copy) 
when you don't have the 
foggiest idea what the other 
station was talking tibout? I 
would rather be considered 
a ham who just is not too 
fast on CW than the charac- 
ter who sends: "R R R solid 



copy here OM please re- 
peat your name, QTH, and 
my report/' Besides, there 
are real ways to be branded 
a beginner 

For BKample^ 

Break into an emergency 
net when you cannot con- 
tribute anything. Keep mak- 
ing unsolicited, helpful sug- 
gestions to the station con- 
trolling the situation. An ex- 
perienced ham would say 
nothing and listen careful- 
ly If the net control station 
wants help, he will ask for it 
specifically 



Any other common things 
to avoid? 

Sure. If you want to 
sound silly in the middle of 
a QSO, give out with an ex- 
tended "HE L LOOO-O" 
to check your plate current 
or output power. Think how 
you must sound on the oth- 
er end. If you feel absolute- 
ly compelled to make a 
check in mid-QSO, simply 
say to the other guy, ''ex- 
cuse me/' put your rig in 
tune, and make a quick 
check. However, putting 
out a carrier for an extend- 
ed period of time is a great 
way to be unpopular and 
cause unnecessary QRM. 
Besides, it's pretty rough on 
your finals. 

/ guess I don't understand. If 
I have to tune my rig and 
match it to the antenna. ! 
have to transmit a carrier. 

Yes, but you don't have 
to transmit it for verv' long 
There are at least two ways 
to handle this problem The 
first is to make up a tuning 
chart for your rig [and an- 
tenna tuner if you use one). 
Record the dial readings as 
you tune up every 50 or 100 
kHz. Now, when you 
change frequency from one 
end of the band to the 
other, just set your knobs to 
the chart and you will only 
have to tweak them slightly 
to tune up. which can be 
done in 2 or 3 seconds [see 
Fig, 3) 

Some of the knobs on my rig 
have caiibration marks 

every quarter of a revolu- 
tion, is this good enough to 
allow me to preset them? 

Probably not, but you 
can ink-in additional lines 
on the knob or use sections 
of self-stick labels. Place a 
small piece of self -stick la- 



TO 
AMTtliliA 



TRANSMITTER 



3=E 



aP^DGE 



J 



RIG PRETUNEO FOR 
MAKIMUM POWER OLFTPUT 
mrO son LOAD 



O 



MATC^SOX PRETUMED 
TO MAKE ANTENNA ■ 
LOCK LtKE 50lt LOAO 



* 



rgMEft OR 

MATCHaax 



^ 



Fig. 8. Tuned up--without ever transmitting through the antenna. 

108 73 Magazine • November. 1982 



bel on the knob skirt (Fig. 4) 
or on the panel (Fig. 5) with 
the additional calibration 
marks inked in Plain white 
paper fastened with rubber 
cement is also durable and 
easily removed later It you 
draw lines on the paper or 
labels, you can protect 
them wtth artist's fixative or 
varnish. 

What is the second way of 
tuning up without transmit- 
ting a carrier for an extended 
period? 

Actually you can tune up 
without transmitting a carri- 
er at all. It takes three 
pieces of equipment; your 
swr bridge, a dummy load, 
and a noise bridge. First, 
connect your rig (Ftg. 6) 
through the swr bridge to a 
dummy load, and at the fre- 
quency you want to oper- 
ate, tune up your rig into 
the dummy load. Then, con- 
nect the noise bridge as 
shown in Fig. 7 and set the 
resistance control on the 
noise bridge to 50 Ohms 
and the reactance control 
to zero Ohms. Next, tune 
your antenna tuner or 
matchbox for a minimum 
noise as heard in your re- 
ceiver. If you have a trans- 
ceiver, be very careful not 
to transmit with the noise 
bridge in the line or it will 
go up in a very rapid puff of 
smoke. 

Now, remove the noise 
bridge and reconnect the 
transmitter through the swr 
meter to the antenna tuner, 
and you are ready to oper- 
ate. What you have done is 
tuned your transmitter to 
its design condition of max- 
imum power out into a 
50-Ohm load, and you have 
made the antenna tuner 
and antenna look like a 
50-Ohm load. Connect the 
two (Fig. 8) and you are 
ready to transmit, with max- 
imum power out You can 
also use this technique to 
make up a tuning chart so 
that you have to go through 
the procedure only once for 
each 50- or lOO-kH^: band 
segment you like to operate 
in.H 



CIRCUITS 



Do you have a technique, modification, or easy'to-dupficate cir- 
cuit that your feffow readers might be interested in ? It so, send us a 
concise description of it (under two pages, doutie-spaced) and in- 
cfude a clear diagram or schematic if needed. 

In exchange for these technicai gems, 73 offers you the choice of 
a bool< from the Radio Bookshop, to be sent upon publication^ Sub- 
mit your idea (and book choice) to: Circuits, Editorial Offices, 73 
Magazine, Peterborough NH 0345$. Submissions not selected tor 
publication will be returned if an BASE is enclosed. 




m 



Ih9i4 



TO CODE 

PRACTICE 

MONITOR 



0^ FILTER: This filter features a 40- l-lz bandwidth and no ringing. To 
use it, tune your receiver so that the code-practice osc/Hator 
dupiicates the signal you want to copy-— Ronald Foll^ert, Benton 
Harbor Mi. 




MAGNET 



RUS^Efi FOOT 



REf\40VABLE MAGNETfC FEET: 
Gear such as Drake's TR-22C is 
fine for mobile or portable use 
but often lacks refinements like 
rubber feet that make it suitable 
for use in the shack. My solution 
to this deficiency was to epoxy 
several small magnets to some 
rubber feet and then stick them 
to the bottom of the radio. When 
the rig goes portable, just re- 
move the feet. If you don't have 
any magnets handy, you can re- 
move some from the magnetic 
cabinet latches sold in hard- 
ware stores. — Tiiomas Hart 
AD1B, Westwood MA. 



WOVAC 



St 



Ft 
5A 

SLO BLO 
— tf'XjP 



34 
lOOOV 



R4 

EroK 



CI 

eoo^F 

S60V 

(FROM POLYPAKS) 



^y 



RS 

£70K 

LW 

■AVV 



■>-l40V 



C6 

eoOiiF 

360V 

{FROM POLVPAKS) 



m 



C2. 

SOOmF 

360V 

(FROM POLYPAKS) 



^^■ 



D2 
3A 

lOOOV 

->h- 



Tl 

aOO TO 2 35V 

TV TRAhfSFORMER 



J 



\ 6. 3 VAC 
■^ >IOA 



[)3 
3A 
lOOOV 

-Ph- 



D4 
3A 
lOOOV 

-w— 



cr 
eoo^F 

seov 

{FROM POLYPAKS) 



03 

eoojiLF 

360V 

{FROM POLYPAKSJ 



C4 

eoo^F 

360V 

(FROM POLVPAKS) 



C5 

600 ^F 

360V 

(FROM POLTpAKS) 



i 



;i 



^ HV 



m 

63K 

\ 2W 



^2 

63K 
2W 



V +300V 



R5 

68K 

2W 



— 2 

SUBSTITUTE TRANSFORf[4ER FOR HEA TH GEAR: The power transformer found in many newer TV sets 
can be used with a voitage-doubler circuit to provide up to 450 vofts dc, as well as bias and filament 
voltages. I used this approach to replace the transformer in a Heathkit HX-10; it also should be suitable 
for the SB and H W series of Heath radios. (Note: Your rig's wiring may need to be modified if it has 12-V 
fiiaments.) — Terry Martin, Carrollton GA. 



54050 





M 








MCI403 






j^ 


' 1 
^ 


^ 


TO 




A 


35 




UHOO?0 






1 






n 


! Iff 



Z.5V 

ilP 
TO 
tOmA 

10,0V 



TOP 

J I I L 

MCI403 

I I n I 

OUT 



BOTTOM 
OUT 



*\H 



GND 




Gr^D 



Slf^PLE VOLTAGE STANDARD: 
This circuit gives you a voltage 
standard to check your VOh/l or 
electronic voltmeter. The 
MCU03 will deliver 2.5 volts 
while the output of the LH0070 
is 10 volts. Both sources are ac- 
curate to one percent or belter. 
You can get other vottages by 
using different members of the 
MC140X and LH007X precision 
regulator series. The diode can 
be anything rated over 40 mA 
and 60 volts p/V.— J. T. Miller 
N6BM, YucaipaCA, 



l£OV 



t^ 



.^^ 



^ 



© 



\20V 
RECEPTACLE 



HEAT CONTROL FOR A SOLDERfNG IRON: This handy circuit 
allows you to reduce the temperature of a soldering iron. Just place 
a diode in series with one side of the ac line. You can easily switch 
the control in and out by shorting the diode. The polarity of the diode 
doesn't matter, t used a 1N2070 diode rated at 400 volts, 0,75 Am- 
peres. Any simiiar diode wili do.— H. H. Hunter W8TYX, Coiumbus 
OH. 



n R3 



f7^ 



47n 



R406 

4JK 

-^wv — 



ADD TO THE ft 



CONTROL HEAD [ "TToO-SOO; 



\Aj ^F 12V / 



R40e 



€ 



04 4 






& KS 



SCAN DELA Y FOR THE AZDEN 2000: By adding a capacitor and re- 
sistor to the Azden 2000"s controi-head circuitry, you can have a 
deiay before the receiver resumes scanning. There is approximateiy 
one second of deiay for each 100 uF of capacitance added^ — Hi am 
Sandel KB2iV, Flanders NJ. 



PAR KINO 

LIGHTS 



tACC.) 



(I> 



Gh 



"& 



Rl 



R2 




BUZZER 



HEA DL IG H T REMiNDER: If your 
headlights or parking tights are 
on^ there wiff be 12 vofts on ter- 
minal 4. If the ignition is off. ter- 
minal 3 wiff be at ground. When 
these two conditions are met, 
the transistor is turned on and 
the buzzer sounds. KA5CRt/9 
suggests that this circuit can be 
built into a surplus seat-belt 
buzzer.— Steve Slout KA5CRi/9, 
Palatine IL 



73 Magazine • Noven^ber, 1982 109 



w 



FUN! 



14) Weary whNe sending 

15) CWnoisas 
21) Old 160 bother 
23) Vibropl©»©5 



24) Sonnetime key plalfeng 

25) On -air organization 

27) N&g alive charge 

28) Traffic organl^anon fabbr.) 



John Edwards KI2U 
78-56 B6W Street 
Giendaie NY 113B5 

CW REMEMBERED 

Like it at nm. mi are witnessing Ihe rwilighl o* the CW era_ AHe«^ more than a ceniury ^ a 
mainstay o* electrk^ and elecifoaic commynicaticw- CW »s on the way oul. 

I make this statement putfiy as a talional otkservaiiofi. Nobody Onduding Wayne J has 
lofced me lo ttiia conclusmn Just look at in© tad's.. Ttiartks to microelectronics, radiotele- 
phon« tran^ecvers need t* r» larger m ^tis I Kan CW-only figs. Gafnp^utef generateri digital 
t;<ymTniinicatton has now reached a point where it is tr^expensive and portable It's also 
taster ami mor« t^taiM than qoOb. ON^^&ice^ as a rrwarts of persona* enioyrrtent— Is 
washed up 

Apparerniy. the FCC agree* witri (his point of view STioctty youNi see the Commission re 
move ttfce CW fequirement from ifw Tech t»censa AHei Ihat. it's iust a matlef of time ^the 
yeaf 2CO0 sounds gooO^ belof a the feds eliminate all code fequuements. In an a^e ol 1s and 
Os. (firs and dahs don t maKe sense Just as CW replaced spark, {x^mputedzed communica- 
tpon lechnrque^ will replace CW 

By now your getting the leeling that I tiaie CW Nat at all I've poiinded the l^ass with i tie 
t«st of ttiam It's |ust that l like most I rue f^io amateurs, look for\wanJ to new challetige*. 
And CW, while fondly rememhwed, shouW be rafegated lo the dusty attic of ham ladio 

hrslory 

This month, we look back at CW ar^ refJec* upon the contribolions it has made lo ouf 
hobby. And if any of v<>u have anything lo say about what tVe written aboui CW, remember: I 
passed a 20^wpm code lest . Can you say the same? 



ELEMENT 1— CROSSWORD PUZZLE 
(Illustration 1^ 



Across 

1) What ih© 'wave" in question Is 
61 As opposed to amateuf (abbr.) 
fl) OFIN silencer tabbr.) 
9) Hams canl t>e ttiis 
11) FCC rule sect (on 

13) Not down 

14) Telegrapher's $tang tor shift 

16) Slash 

17) 3.14 

18) CW term of affection 

19) CW .chuckle 

20) Learning code is this 
22) Mam organ Izal ion 
24> ARRL's Stan 



25) Jammet 

26) Some say' CW does this 

29] AflRL brasspojnding position (abbr 1 
30) No code ops? 



Down 

1) Points on a key 

2) Pressing a key 

3) Weak signal place to noise 

4) Early code rnode 

5) CW subband locaiFon 
7) US President's iniUais 

10) End ol message 0bbr.) 
12) A bug is semi- 




25 


23 




26 


27 


28 


1 


^^29 







ELEMENT 2—MULTIPLE CHOICE 

1J Samwal F. B Morse, father of telegraphy, was a man of many talents At the lime he in- 
ventefl the telegraph, wfiai was his profession? 

1J Professof of art at New York Oniverstty 
21 Electrical engineer 

3) Lab assi Slant |$ Thomas Eciisoi> 

4) Professor of theology at Yale 

2) What Wife the fimt words transmitted via code? 

1) Tesftng one. two. three. 

2) Helio. Watson. Can you heaf me? 
3» Greetings ffom the President 

4) What tiad God wrought r 

3> The invento* of «t*e Vibcople^ semiautQ<Ttatic key was- 

t> Hugo Gemsback 

2) Horace G- Martin 

3) Thomas Edisofl 
4\ Clarence Tuska 

4) What d*d Hifam f^cy Maxim name his favorite sparlt ttarwmittef? 

If Spart^y 

2) Old Betsy 

31 Utile Darling 

4^ the ARRL Special 

5) What device wa& used on tet^raph lines to create an audibte sound at tf>e receiving end? 

%) Heterodyne beater 
Z\ Sour^^ 

3) Beat-frequency osclllalor 

4) Mechanical audio osctllator 



ELEMENT 3— TRUE-FALSE 



True 



False 



U C. W JtflcCall was the inventor of "continijous 
waves.'' 

2) Samuel F. 8. Morse invented ine continental code 

3) The Initials F- B. In ^rtorse's name stood lor 
"Fine Susmess/' 

4) ITS legal lo send continental code on US ham 
Irequencles. 

5J The PCC clUclally banned spark transmissions In 

1954. 

C) Our end at message signal— AR— is nothing but 
the Amencan Morse letters FN meaning -Finish/' 

7) The "Glass Arm" ts the top award presented by 
the Society of WIretess Pioneers- 

6] Barry Goldwater K7L>GA is the ham who inlro 
duced I he League s "Tune in the Wond CW prac- 
tice tape. 

9) The first rrremory keyer used six relays, 
10} At one lima, the Extra-Class ticket required 
proriciency at 2& wpnv 



ELEMENT 4— SCRAMBLED WORDS 



GUB 

CCNOTTA 
YREKE 



BONK 
GHINSP 
SIFT 
IGHTEWING 



YEKDROAB 

KCILC 

D£SEP 



THE ANSWERS 



Bemem J: 

llluatralion I A. 



110 73 Magazine 



Htustration h 

November* 1982 



fiemeni 2' 

1—1 They always said that learning the code was an ait. 

2^4 Funny. Morse didnt ir^lude God as a co-inventor in his patent 

3— 2 W?>ai1 yo« didn't kripw this one? 

4 — 2 The League sun has it in its museum. 

S— 2 Click Qii^k-cl^cH. Olck. 

1— False- He wroie that crummy CB "Com^" song. 

2— False, American 

3— False. Rnley Broese 

4 —True. Why not? it's Ifve one ihe FCC tests us on. 



S— False, 1927. 

6— True. Vou learn something new every day; 

7— False, A "'glass arm'" is & weary arm. 

&— False, Jean Shepherd KSOBS did the tionors. 

9— True. Developed in 1953, the "Ultimatic" used srx relays, No microchips then, 

10 — False, [t has always been pegged at 20. 

(Reading Irom left to oghl) BUG, KNOB, KEYBOARD; CONTACT, SPRING, CLICK; KEYER, 

FIST. SPEED; WEfGHTlNG 



SCORING 

Element 1: 

Twenty- Jive points for the completed puzzile, or one-ha^f polnffor each question correcily 
answered, 

Ef&mer^t 2: 

Five. points for each correct answer. 

Element 3: 

Two and one- ha if points for each correct ansv/er. 

El&m&nt 4: 

Three and one-half points for each correct answer. 



How well do you remember CW? 

1-20 points— Not at ad 
21-40 points— Vaguely 
41-60 points— Failed 13 wpm twice 
61-80 points— CW buff 
S1-100+ points— A1 Op Club Member 



C O N T I N U O U S 



B 




Hiustfatson lA. 



HAM HELP 



I need the schematic and manual for a 
Knightkit coJor patlern generator, model 
KG-685. 1 will pay for copying and postage. 
Thank you. 

John C. McKee 

1127Vernie 

Alton I L €2002 



Does anyone have a recent Elst or roll 
tube Chan for (he HicKok 539B tube tester? 
It shouJd be no mora than 2 or 3 years old if 
possible. 

Marviri Moss W4UXJ 

Box 2S601 

Atlanta GA 30328 



We are happy to provicfe H&m Heip list- 
ings free, on a space-av&if^ble bssis. We 
are not happy when we have to t^ke time 
from other duties to decipher cryptic 
notes scrawled ategfi^ly on dog-eared 
post cards andcdd-stzed sor^ps ofpaper^ 
Please type or print your request (neatiyf^f 
double spaced, on an SVi^'x 11" sheet of 
paper and us& upper- srtd lowercase let- 
ters where appropriate. Also, please make 
a 'V" took like & *!:' not an "I," which 
couid be an "e/" or an "ey&/' and so on. 
H&rd &s it may be to believe, we are not fa- 
mWar with every piece of equipment man- 
ufBOiured on Earth for the last BO year^f 
Thanks for your cooperation. 

\ need an L6 passband tuning coil {part 
ttK4203l1) and an L1 bifHar coil (part 
#K42032-1). Both are for the Hallicfafters 
HC-10 convorter. Call me collect at 
(907J-733-2447 or contact me at the ad- 
dress provided; 

Jack N orris 

Box 321 

Ta]»(aatna AK 99676 

t am looking for a meter for a Knight- 
kit VTVM made by Allied Radio Corpora- 
tion and a meter for a Simpson 260 
VOM (20,000 Ot>ms-per-volt). Anyone: 
having either of these two items, pteasa.- 
contact me, 

Guy A. EWer WB5JEV 

1316 Main Street 

West Point KV 40177 

I need the schematic diagrams and 
owner's rnanijal for the Knightkit T-150A 
transmitter and the B-IOOA receiver. I wifl 
pay all postage and copying costs. 

Atitonlo V, Viliarteuva 

do Mrs. Eriinda V. Pastrana 

72ia Beftnger Court 

Springfield VA 22150 

^See List of Advertisers on page ^30 



NEW TS830S for $1 50? 



Yes indeed [ Just add a Matched Pair of top- 
quality 2.1 KHz BW (bandwidth) Fox Tango 
R iters. Here are a few quotes from users: 

. Makes s new rig ouf at my otd TS830Si . . 
.^VBT now works the wey t dreamed it should, 
\..SpoctAcufar fmpfot^ement m SSB s^t&cttvfty..^" 
Completely efiminatss my rtB&d tor a CW fittar.. 
'.^.Simpie instatiation - axceflent instructions..." 



it 



n 



ti 



§1 



H 



The Fox Tango f filers are notabty superior to both 
original 2.7 KHz BW units but especially the 
modest ceramic 2nd IF: our substitutes are 8-poie 
discrete -crystal construction, The comparative 
FT vs Kenwood results? VBTOFF — RX BW; 2.0 vs 
2.4; Shape Factor: 1 ,19 vs 1 .34; SOdB BW: 2.48 vs 
3.41 : Uitimate Rejection: 1 lOdB vs 80, VBT SET 
FOR CW at 300Hz BW — SF2.9 vs 3-33; Insertion 
Loss: IdB vs lOdB. 

OPTIONAL CONNECTIONS 

Fox Tango filters for RX and TX; Fox Tango for RX - 
Kenwood for TX; FT for RX - switch-setect FTor K 
for TX; switch-seiect FT or K for RX/TX. 

INTRODUCTORY PRICB (Complete KitJ,..$150 
Includes Matched Pair of Fox Tango Fitters, 

aii needed cables and parts, detailed 
instructions. 

Shipping $3 {Air $5). FL Sales Tax 5% 

ONE YEAR WARRANTY 
GO FOX-TANGO -TO BE SURE! 

Order by Mail or Telephone. 

AUTHORIZED EUROPEAN AGENTS 

Scandinavia MICROTEC (Norway) 

Other: ING01MPEX [West GermanyJ 



FOX TANGO CORPORATION 

Box 15944S. W Palm Beach, FL 33406 
Phone: 1305} 683-9587 ^3^ 







CW MORSE 
for the 

TRS-80* COLOR 
COMPUTER 

Our Plug-in Morse-Pah^ 

fnterfaces the Co! or 

Computer to your 

transceiver and allows 

you to communicate in 

CW Morse Code 
through the computer. 

^Installs in minutes^ 
irSimple to operateif 

^Handles code speeds 

up to 60 wpmif 

many more features 



We stack ocompi^te Hn^ ;qT tictor computer 
i^.cter? $ Qri^^ . in c ftidin g : 

■Ficppy cfi^k coniroHers • Seridi !/0 
Parts » Add Of i FPROM k!t$ - P^ug-tn 
BirtityiJtfi^Njrds. ' i^A-M tKpon^fOf] ktt!<. 

Write for brochure to: 

ATOMTRONICS ^''' 
3195 ARIZONA AVE, 
LOS ALAMOS, NM 8754^^ 

I andy Corporation 



73 Magazine • November, 1982 111 



SSB FILTER 



CIRCUITS 



^00 HI 



Do you have a technique, modification, or casy-lo-dupHcate cir- 
cuit tha t your feihw readers might be interested in? If so, send us a 
concise description of if (under two pages, double-spacecl) and in- 
clude a clear diagram or schematic if needed. 

In exchange for these technical gems, 73 offers you the choice of 
a book from the Radio Bookshop, to be sent upon pubtication. Sub- 
mit your idea (and book choice) to: Circuits, Editorial Offices, 73 
Magazine, Peterborough NH 03458. Submissions not selected for 
publication wili be returned if an SASE is enciosed. 



TAJL 

LI&HT 

SWITCH 



/rr 



IN400I OR 
EQUIVELENT 




HJMITION 
OH ACC, 
SWITCH 



T 



t^ ] SONALEHT® 



I^NITJON 



SIMPLIFIED HEADUGHT RE- 



MI NDER ALARM: The circuit 
uses just two components, one 
sificon diode and one Sona- 
lert™ (4-28 V dc). Both of these 
items can be purchased surplus. 
The diode is a prevention device, 
protecting the signaling device 
and ensuring that the ignition 
switch is isolated from the cir- 
cuit.— RiCh^fd S. Shepard AI5H, 
San Antonio TX. 



GENERATOR 

OR 
ALTERNATOR 



ORlGtNfiL CON M EC Tip NjO^ 



^'"isiow 

/ HERE 



L 

D 



^ 



K ' ^fl. 




MEW CONNECTfON 
rO ALTEHNftTOR 



Bl 



ORIGJWAL ELECtftJCiiL SY5TEM 




BZ 



WO TOR 



L 
D 
A 
P 



AUXILIARY SYSTEM 



DC AUXILIARY SYSTEM WITH ISOLA TION: Presented here is a sim- 
ple auxiliary battery system. Battery 82 is isolated from the primary 
battery by diode D2, and 01 is protected as well. Both diodes should 
be at least 40 Amperes forward current, and 50 to 100 piv. A heavy 
wire from the junction of the two anodes connects to the charging 
device term in a L Do not rewire so that 01 is between the battery and 
the starter motor.— A, W, Edwards K5CN, McAllen TX. 



RECORDER 
5fl. OUTPUT 



KEY 




AUTOMATIC CO CALLER: Record and serjd CO or CQ OX— or any 
message— cheaply and easily. Begin by recording your message on 
a cassette tape. This recording will be used to drive the circuit. 
Mount the full-wave bridge astride the relay (Kt). Solder the + and 
common leads to the coil leads. T1 is Supergiued to K7. The 
assembly can be mounted inside a transceiver or outboard in a box. 
Wire the relay output to the key jack, install a jack to receive the au- 
dio output from the cassette^ Endfess-ioop cassettes are available 
from Radio Shack, Five-minute cassettes are available from 
Pyramid Data Systems, 6 Terrace Ave,, New Egypt NJ 0^533,— Dave 
Nesbitt WD4AAW, Decatur GA. 




L3B BFO 
3S93.5 KH: 



CW FILTER CENTER 

FREOUENCY iM5 KHt 

FREQUENCY ^ 



USB BFO 



Pig- 1^ 



SSB FfLT£R 



CW FitTER 




NEW LSa BFO 
CfiVSTftL 3392.79 KHi 



FILTEH CENTER 
3395 KNi 



USa BFt) 
3396 5 KHl 



FREOUENCY- 



Fig. 2. 



SSB FILTER 



£70 Hr 
CW FtLTER 





CW FILTER 
CENTER FR 

eaao 7 khj 



LSS BFO 

a.3£e.5KNJ 



SSe FILTER CENTER 
FREQUENCY B330 KHi 

FREQUENCY p- 



USB 8F0 
8331.5 KHi 



Fig. 3. 



MODtFICATION TO THE KENWOOD TS-520S FOR AFSK: Fig. 1 
shows the passband of the Kenwood TS'520S. By installing a crystal 
with a frequency of 3392790 Hz. the RTTY tones of 2125/2295 Hz will 
be right in the middle of the filters' respective passbands. See Fig. 2. 

Fig. 3 shows the i-f filters. When Installing the 270 Hz filter, follow 
the directions given in the manual except for the following: 1) install 
the filter in the SSB narrow position; and 2) jumper lead "A " to the 
"SSN" position and jumper lead ''B" to the '*SSB'\position. 

To set the filter, turn the switch to '*CAL''and tune fora2210-Hz 
tone (a scope is helpful, or else tune to a null on your RTTY tuning 
meter).— H\chat6 Kulaga KA9EDX, Fond du Lac Wl. 



10 VOLT 5% 1/4 WATT 
ZENER OiODE 



C*> 



AUTOMOTIVE 

ELECTRICAL 

SYSTEM 



0-5V0C 

XI 1000 OHlvtj'VOLT 
DC VOLTMETER 



o- 



AN INEXPENSIVE EXPANDED- 
SCALE VOLTMETER: Use an un- 
sealed 0-5-V-dc lOOO-Ohm-per- 
volt meter movement. Solder a 
10.0-volt, 5%, V4-Watt zener di- 
ode to the positive meter termi- 
nal (this is located under the 



case). tJse as short as possible a 
lead for good mechanical stabil- 
ity, observing zener polarity. 
Change the numbering on the 
meter face to 10 15 V dc. Use 
either a razor-pointed marking 
pen or dry-transfer numbers. Re- 
assemble the meter and test it 
before Installing It in your car. 
To ensure greatest accuracy, 
pre-check the zener and make 
certain that it is as close as pos- 
sible to 10.0 volts.— A\an Chris- 
tian WA6YOB, San Jose CA. 



112 73f^agazine * November, 1982 



SOCML 



EVENTS ] 



Listings m this coiumn ^re provided free ci 
chsf^ on a space^v&ifabie bssts^ the fal- 
towmg mformaiion shouHf be incfuded tn 
e^&y ^nrrouncement sponsor, event, date, 
time, pi&<x. City, stste. admtssion cttarge ftf 
^nyh textures, tBtk-m tF^quencies. and tfte 
name of wrtom focoamci torfufThef mtorma- 
tuan. AnmHincefTt&tts must be received at 73 
^^iigazine by the- first of Itte month, two 
months pnor to the month m whtch theevertt 
takes o/ace. Marl to Ed^tonai Offa^es. 73 Mafj- 
azine. Pine Street Peteeboroi^ NH 03#5a 



DEARBORN Ml 
NOV 4 

En con Corporation, in coapefaiKin with 
Sotarei Corporation, mtit provide a N&e 
photovoitajc ieUsciUQii^ ftom the sunj 
semttiat at 7: 30 (hti on Ho'^mber 4 at the 
Deaf bom Hyatt Reigeficy Dearborn Ml A 
latk on the history, ptoductton, anti appli- 
cations ot sotar cells will inlorm a^id otlu< 
caie alt those who attend Fof reserva- 
tions, contact Encon Corporation. 27504 
School Craft Fid . Livonia Ml 4&t50, (313)- 
261-4t30 



SOUTH GREEiySBUHG PA 
NOV 6 

The Foothills Amat^ui Radio Club W4fl 
hcrld its annual SiA^ap anrt Shop on S^tor 
ijav. Novemt>e? 6. T9a2. ar St. Bruno 
Church Suuih Gfeensbui^ PA ritKots 
aie Z2 0Q each or 3 to^ $& 00 ItHMi' will bv 
an irulixJT ti&a marKef and iood t ,i1K m on 
t4l3 07/67 and ;5Z/.52 Foi fnon* Ueuilii 
coritacl Mafio Canerfa W3TTN, uf vynu> 
FARC PO Bun 236, Grefjrisburg MA VMiO\ 



provided to the first rBservations f&ceivedi. 
When those tablet ars gone, space wiM be 
atfa^'able lor s-e^tJing from the floor or frorrv 
your own table Food will t;ie available. Sell- 
ef s may set up at 8:00 am. an<i walk-ins wdl 
be admitted from 9:01 untrl 3:00. For reser- 
vations, send cfieck of nioney o^der pay- 
able to SCARA " to Ed Goldbefg WAtZZO. 
433 Ellsworlh Avenue. New Haven CT 
OSSII Include an SA5E for conftrtnatKm, 



iANGKOK THAILAND 
NOV 12 14 

The Radio Amateut Society of TUatland 
{RAST} wifl hold the 12th aJinuai Scnitli East 
Asia NetwOfk Corwention iSEANET a2f on 
Friday. Satutday. and Stjnday. Novefnber 
l2-t4, 19S2. at tirve Imperlat Hoi&l, Bangkok. 
Tlia>lan.d, Thete wiit be lectofes diseus- 
i9»ons. and cotnmierci'al eithitwts For more 
del ails contact RaSI Secretary. PO flO)» 
2006. BanghoK. Tt^ailand 



NEWMARKET ONT CANADA 
NOV 13 

The York Regron ARC wit I fioid Its an- 
nual flea market on Saturday. November 
13. 19B2. from 0800 to 1400 EST. at the 
Newmarl<;ei Community Gen ire. Newmar- 
ket, Ontatio. Ooofs will open at 0630 lor 
exhlbUors. General admission js S2.00 
{children will b€ admitted free of charge if 
accompanied by an adufO. Refteshments 
will be available. Exhibitors-' tables &fe 
%2m each, Talkm on 142.52 fVE3¥RA) 
and 147 22SA&25(VE3YRC). 



BtLLERICA MA 
NOV 20 

The Hon^yweJl 1200 Radio Club and the 
Walt ham Amatour Radb Association wlH 
hold lh<>ir annuat amateur rad^b and elec- 
tronics auction on Saturday. Mowember 20. 
19B2. at the HonoyweM Plant, 300 Concord 
Road. Biiienca MA (eKit 27 oft route 3 J. 
Doors mW op^n at 10: 00 am ano admission 
and parking are tree There wilt tie a snack 
bar and a bargain pafis store. Talli'iri oh 
147 72^ 12 and 146 04/64 For moremtorma- 
tion, contact Doug Purdy NIBLIB. 3 Vcsco 
Road, Burlington MA 01603 



CANTON OH 
NOV 21 

The Mas^ttlon Amateur Radio Ciut> 
iWaNPi will present Auction test '82 on No- 
V6mt>ef 21 1982, at the Na^ir Grotto Hall. 
6th ar>d Diieber Avenue SW. Canton OH, 
Advance tickets are $2 50: at the door. 
S3.00. Doors WIN open at 7:00 am for set^ 
ups ar>d 8iO0 am for others. The auciioh 
wtil start at 11:00 am. Talk in on 146.52 
For advance tickets or tables, contact 
Steve Nevei WDflMIJ. 1064 Massachu- 
setts Avenue SB, Massilton OH 4464$. 



GREENSBOflO NC 
NOV 27-28 

The Greensboro Amateur Radio Clut> 
will hold the second annual Gfeensdoro 
Ham test on Novemt>er 27-28. 1S82, at the 
Mailona^ Guard Armory. Greensboro NO. 
The hours mi\ be 9:00 am to 5:00 pm on 
November 27 ih and §:00 am to 3:00 pm on 
November 28th Pre-rtgistration b€lore 
November 12, 1962. is $3,00 and registra- 
llon at I he door Is $4.00. There will tie 
tables and taiigating avaiiable. Talk->n on 
145.25. 19/79, and 52 For preregistia- 
tjon {please Include an SASE| or more 



details, coniaci Russ Brand! KE4KL 1301 
Dayton Street. Greensboro NC 27407. 

STONY BROOK Li NV 
NOV:^ 

The Radio Central Amateur Radio Club 
tArill hold its fourth annual Ham-CentraL 
19^ edition, on Sunday. November 2B, 
1982. in the main socral hall oi Temple 
Isaiah. 1404 Stony Rrooft Road. Stony 
Bfook U NY (about 50 mites east ol New 
Yofk City). Doofs will pfien at 7: 30 am lor 
seiters and deaiefs ar%t at 8i30 !or the gen- 
eral pubhc Admission is $2:00 and XYLs 
arKl children under 12 will be admit ted free 
Nirte-fpot tables a/e S5.00 each and rial I 
tabJes are $3.Qa Features will include an 
updated antenna lecture t]fy Ait (W2LH) and 

Madeline iVU2EEOl Greenberg, home 
ooohed iKtl food, arid drrn^s Talk in o«i 
144350 145-150 tWASUECi and 14635 Fof 
addilioaa] mfoiTrratiarL maps., and advance 
res#fvaliotirS, coniaci Scolty Po<licastro 
KA2EQW. m 7m Stieet. Bohemia N¥ 11 716 
i5lf>»-5e9^2557. Of Bob Yattnus K2RGZ 
i Ifaven Court. L^t^ Gio^ NV ttT^ 
t51o>9flt 2709, 



HAZEL PARK Ml 
DEC 5 

The 17th annual Haifel Parl^ Amal(*ui 
Radio Club Swap and Shop will be held 
Sunday. Dec. b, at Hazel Park High 
School. Hazel Park Ml Hazel Park High 
S^:hool IS located on Hughes Stieet at d* # 
Mile Rd . t mile east ol I 75, Tic:*^ets ate 
St. 50 »ri advance or £2 00 at the door 
fables are Si. 00 oer loot 13txjrs open at 
dOO am Plenty of food and paii^mtj wut bo 
avajlable^ fa! km on 146.52 For tickets. 
Idt>3e rcseivations. and mlurmat^on. send 
dti SASE to Haze! ParK Amateut ftadio 
Club. PO Sox 36ti, Hazel Park Ml 48030 m 
tn I L'phu ne < 3 1 3 ] 398 3 1 HtJ 



SELLERSVILLE PA 
NOV 7 

TheR. F, Hill ARC will hold lls6th annu^ 
al hamfest on November 7, ;9S2, In the 
Sellersvllle National Guard Armory^ Sell- 
ersville PA. Doors will open al 7:00 am for 
severs and 8:00 am for buyers, There will 
Ufc r ei r e.^hrnis n f s a n d h eat r a t K ■ rn on ,2y ^ tia 
and .52 For turiher intoimaiio^v. comae [ 
R F Ht!i ABC. 8o* 29. Golmar PA 18915 



CONCORD NC 
NOV 7 

The Cabarrus Amateur Radio Society. 
Inc., wiff hold rts annua) hamfest on Novem- 
ber 7. 1982. from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm. at the 
Concord Boys Club, Spring Si reel. Concord 
NC. Admission tickets are |2 50 m advance, 
S3.O0 at the door Flea-market tables am 
£4 00: fable space m S2,50. There will be 

bmgo lor the ladies, speakers, and ficnum& 
Hot food, beverages, and free lurking will 
lie dvaiiabte. Tai^iin on 146655 Pot ad 
vance tickets. llea-m.ark«^i tables, or %p^je 
5e«d a cheek to CAftS PO Bo.t 1290 Con 
cord NC wmb 

NORTH HAVEN CT 
NOV 7 

The Soulhcentrat Connecticut Amateur 
Hadro Association's fSCARA'sf Ihird ann\#- 
al electronics ftea market will t>& held On 
Sunday, November 7. 1962 indn^ois at the 
North Haven Recreatton Centet on Unsitfy 
Street in North Haven CT Regular admts 
sion I J, SI. 25: children under t2 with an 
adult «ilt be admtitied tree, Sellers' spaces 
ar^ S6.00. The ttest spaces wiM tse assigned 
first. A limited numbet of tree tables will be 

^ See its I of Aaverti%e^& on page T30 



FORT WAYNE IN 
NOV 14 

Tha Allen Gounly Amateur Hadio Tech- 
nical Society, Ir^c. (AC-ARTS), will hold 
the lOlh annual Fort Wayne Hamfest on 
November 14, 1982^ at Ihe Allen Counly 
Memorial Coliseum, Fort Wayne lisi. Ad- 
mission is $2,50 m advance and S3.00 at 
the door: children under age 11 will be ad- 
mitted free. Regular tabtes are Sfi 00 and 
premium tables are $20.00: The Coliseum 
charges a $1.00 parking fee. Doors will 
open to the general public at 8:00 am and 
for vendor setups at 5:00 am. For further 
ticket or table mfornratlon. write Becky 
Skinner KA9GWE, 9720 Pinto Lane, Fori 
Wayne IN 4^804 



^TS4 



AnENTION: ICOM & KENWOOD OWNERSI' 

IF YOU ARE NOT RECEIVING OUR 
MONTHLY NEWSLETTERS. YOU 
ARE NOT TUNED INTO A WEALTH 
Of INFORMATION!!? 






**aihrrCard 






SubJicH^Mcn Co*t fnar lO'lCOM or Kenwood Nr^wikticra; USA 19.00 
.AniiLi«| (BuU Kilri^ 112,00 Firtt Cli», CaD^ai & MfiIcd 110.00 - elur- 
whtrp (Air Mil]) tt2 OQJtrEClAiritlCE FOR BOTH NEWSLETTEIS |2i 
k»«ni| i2,MOFI ir«DrVIDl'4L PfUCES. We boncr M»lcr Chtrge ^mi 
VISA Trlrphgnr (irdprs n^^tri-pird . 'Wf fere tn itilDrrcimtiDn eichingr for 
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liDiii} hrq^kuj'r wb4 h«l of rCOM & KcnwDDd Kiie. Siind to^ 

USERS INTERNATIONAL RADIO CLU8 
364 KMpatrkk Ave., Port St. Luci«, Fl 33452 
USA ~ Phone 305/878-7296 -^^'^ 



DON^T TIME OUT. . . TIME IIS 



Introducing Toggle Time 

Model TI-IO iime alen for repealer opcmiors to avoid fiming out repeater. { PATENTED) 
•Setismve enough for HT*s •Automatic; Scnftes RF carrier -no contiectioit to rig *Baiicr\ 

powered *Resets on carrier drop-mtl •Adjustable limine period *Size 5 1/4x3 5/16x1 34 
•%'eiEiit 8 oz./226,S Grains 
Picrdngt 6«? KHz alert tone 



Model TI-10as5embied..S69 
Model TMOk, kit rorm,.S52 
Primed Circuit Board and 





Toggle Time Is a 10 minuie 
limer that would be utilized 
b> a ham to keep within FCC 
10 mtn, ID rules, ll i<i actuat- 
ed by a lo^le switch which 
serves two purposes: 



Documentation .,SI5.00 . _ ^_.^ 

Dealer ^ B^as tiniirt^ pcruKl when power is applied. ^ 

inquiries '^ hen Toggle Time time?* out it lets you know with a loud tone. Price $14*95 

invited Shipping Sl Handling add S2 Send check, money order or COD *batierv^ included 

^i4i> MC ^hcii ordering* pleu-'ie specif > mudd jtC 3 1/4x21/8x1 I S 

COMSTAR RESEARCH pm. H0\ m \Uuthtm Uehhn, \f 148071 



73 Magazine * November, 1 982 113 



comsjs 



Robert Baker WB2GFE 
15 Windsor Dr. 
Atco NJ 08004 

ALAHA CONTEST 

Starts: 0001 GMT Novembtr 13 
Ends: 2359 GMT November 13 

Sponsored by the Ajsiralian Ladles' 
Amateur Radio As sod at J on, the contest 
\s open to all licensed operators and 
SWLs throughout the vJor\d. YLs work 
everyonei OMs work YLa only. All bands 
may be u&ed, phone and CW combrned. 
EacJi station may be worthed twice on 
each band— once on phone and once on 
CW, All contacts must be made in accor- 
dance with operator and statbn license 
regulations. No net or list operations, no 
crosgmode, and no repeater contacts may 
be claimed. 

EXCHANGE: 

ALAR A members send RS(T), serial 
number starting v^ith 001. and ALABA 
number and name. Others (YL nonmem- 
bers or OMs} send RS(T), serial number 
starting wrth 001, and name. 

FREQUENCIES.' 

Phone- 3570-3590, 7t00-7l20, 14280- 
143O0, 14iaO-U200, 21350-Z1370. 21160- 
21200, 28480 28520, 

CW-3525'3535, 7010-7020, 14060- 
14060,21125-21135, 26100-26110. 

SCORfNG: 

On phone — 10 points for ALARA club 
stations contacted (VK^DVL or VK3DYF). 
5 points for ALARA members^ 3 points for 
YL non-members, 1 pomt Jor OMs. 

On CW— doutile all point values shown 
for phonSt 

For SWLS"5 points for ALARA mem- 
bers logged and 3 points tor YL nonmem- 
bers Jogged. 

AWARDS: 

Certlttoates will be awarded to the top 
scoring ALARA member In each country 
and VK call area; top scoring YL nonmem- 
ber, OM, and SWL on each continent; and 
the top scoring VK tstovice. 

ENTRiES: 
Send a single log containing dale^time 



In GMT, band^ mocte, callsign worked, re- 
port and serial number sent^receNed. 
name of operator of station worked, and 
points claimed, Logs must be signed and 
should show full name, callsign, and ad- 
dress of operator along with flna^ score 
claimed. Logs must be legible, eittier 
typed or printed, no carbon copies please. 
No log^ will be returned and the decision 
of the contest manager will be tInaL Logs 
must be received by the contest manager 
by Dec. 31SL Address entries to: iVlrs. Mar- 
garet Loft VK30ML, 28 Lawrence St., Cas- 
tle main e, Victoria, Australia 3450. 



EUROPEAN DX CONTEST— 

RTTY 

Starts: 0000 GMT November 13 
Ends: 2400 GMT November 14 

Sponsored by the Deutscher Amateur 
Rad^o Ctub (DARC), Only 36 hours of oper- 
ation out of the AB'houf period are permit- 
ted tor single-operator stataons. The 12 
hours oi nonoperation may be taken in not 
more than three periods at any time dur- 
Irvg the contest. Operating classes In- 
cJude: single opefator/allband and muttl- 
operator/single transmitter. Mulii-opera- 
tor^slngle transmitter stations are only al- 
towad to change band one time within a 
15-minate period, except for making a new 
multiplier. Use all amateur bands from 3.5 
th rough 28 M Hz. A contest QSO can be es- 
tablished between all continents and also 
one's own continent. However. QSOs as 
well as QTC iraffilc with one's own country 
are nof aiiovvGd! Each station can be 
worked only once per band. 

EXCHANGE: 

Eicchange the usual six-digEt number 
consisting of RST and progressive QSO 
number starting with O01- 

SCQRiNQ: 

Each QSO counts 1 point. Each QTC 

^given or received) counts 1 point. Multipli- 
ers wiii be counted according to the Euro- 
pean and ARRL countries lisL The multi- 
pii^r on 3.5 MHz may be multiplied by 4, on 
7 lAHz by 3, and on 1 4 through 28 M Hz by 2. 
However, contacts within the same conti- 
nent only count as a muiliplier of one per 
band {including 60 and 40 meters). The fi- 
nal score is the total QSO points plus QTC 



points multipled by the sum total 
muLtlpllers. 

QTC JRAFffC: 

Additional point credit can be realized 
by making usa of the QTC traffic teature, 
A QTC is a report ot a confirmed QSO that 
has taken place earlier In the contest and 
later sent back to another statton— the 
general Idea being thai after a number of 
stations have been worked, a list of these 
stations can be reported back during a 
QSO with another station. An additional 1 
point credit can be claimed for each sta^ 
lion reported 

A QTC contains the time, call, and QSO 
number of the station being reported, i.e., 
l300fDA1AAyi34. This means that at 1300 
GMT you worked DAlAA and received 
number 134. A QSO can be reported only 
once and not back to the originating sta- 
tion, A maximum of 10 OTCs to a station is 
perm itted. You may work the same station 
several times to complete this quota but 
only the original contact has QSO point 
value^ Keep a uniform (ist of QTCs sent. 
QTC 3^7 Indicates that this Is the 3rd se- 
ries of QTCs sent and that 7 QSOs are 
reported. 

AWARDS: i 

Certificates to the highest scorer in 
each ciasslFlcation in eacH country^ rea- 
sonable score provided. Continental iead- 
ars will be honored with plaques. Certifi- 
cates will also be given stations with at 
least haif the score of the continental 
leader or with at least 250,000 points. The 
minimum requirements for acertlficate or 
a iropny are 100 QSOs or 10,000 points. 

ENTRIES: 

Violation of the rules, unsportsmanlike 
conduct, or taking credit for excessive du- 
pllcate contacts will be deemed sufficient 
cause for disqualiificatton. The deoisions 
of the contest committee are final. It Is 
suggested to use the log sheets of the 
DARC or oquivaienl. Send a larQe SASE to 
get [he wanted number of logs and sum- 
mary sheets (40 QSOs or QTCs per Sheet). 
SWLs apply the rules accordingly. Entries 
should be Sent no later than December 
15th to- DAHC OX Awards. PO Box 1328^ 
D-B95 Kaufbeuren, West Germany. 

EUROPEAN COUNTRY UST: 

C31, CTl, CT2. DL. DIM, EA, EA6, EL F, 
FC, G. GC Guer, GO Jer, GD, Gi^ GM, GM 
Shetland, GW, HA. Ha9, HBB^ HV. I, IS, IT, 
JW Bear, JW, JX, LA, LX. LZ. Ml, OE, OH, 
OHO, OJffl, OK, OH, OY. 02, PA, SM. S. SV, 
SV Crete, SV Rhodes, SV Athos, TA1, 
UA1346, UA2, UBS, UC2, UNI, U05, UP2, 



UQ2. UR2, UA Franz Josef Land. YO. YU, 
ZA, AB2, 3A, 4U1,9H1, 



DELAWARE QSO PARTY 

Starts: 1700 GiVIT November 13 
Ends: 2300 GMT Novenriber 14 

Sponsored by the Delaware ARC. Sta- 
tions may be worked once par band and 
mode for QSO and multiplier credits. 

EXQhANGE: 

QSO number, RS(T), and Delaware 
county, ARRL section, or countiy- 

FREQUENCiES: 

GW~ie05, 3560. 7050, 14060. 21060, 
2S160. 

SSB-1615, 3975, 7275, 14326, 21425, 
28650. 

Novice— 3710. 7120, 21120, 28120. 

SCORiNG: 

Delaware stations score 1 point per 
QSO. Multiply total by the number of 
ARRL sections and DX countries workedi 

Others scores points per Delaware sta- 
tlon worked. Multiply total by the number 
of Delaware counties worked on each 
band and each mode (maximum of 36 mul* 
tipliers possible}. The three Delaware 
counties are: Keni, New Castle, and 
Susse^^ 

ENTRIES SEAWARDS: 

Appropriate awards will be given lo the 
top scorers. In addition, a certificate to all 
stations working all three Delaware coun- 
•tlas. If you work all three counties and 
want the WDEL Award, send two 20-cent 
stamps and an address label. Mail logs by 
December iTth to: Charlie Sculley AE3H, 
103 E. Van Buren Avenue, New Castle DE 
19720, Send an SASE for a copy of the 
results. 



SANDUSKY RADIO 

EXPERIMENTAL LEAGUE 

QSO PARTY 

Starts: 1800 GMT November 13 
Ends: 1800 GMT November 14 

The 50lh Anniversary of the Sandusky 
(Ohio) Radio Experimental League, Inc;, 
Ui^ill be observed and celebrated with a 
QSO party whWe members of the club op- 
erate on five amateur bands using the 
Club call, W8LQZ. Frequencies will be: 
23150 arrd 7125 for Novices; 3740, 7040 ^ 
14040, 21040. and 26040 on CW; 3910. 
7265, 14200, 2136a and 28600 on phone. All 
frequencies plus/minus 10 kHz. 




Y^iOW 




NEWSLETTER CONTEST WINNER 

This month's winner js Smolie Signals., pyblished by ihe Yellow Thunder Ama- 
teur Fladio Club of Sarabop Wl. The layout is superb and the articles are written 
In a humorous, low-key style. The newsletter isfulEof excellent news Items from 
.around ihe nation and overseaSi making It appear more like a nationally-based 
newsletter. Also, a schedule of all the traffic nets in Wisconsin Is Included. The 
paper Is lull of interesting items, such as fox-hunt rules and updates on the 
members" activliies. The editor, Jim Romelfanger K9ZZ. has done an outstand' 
Ing |ob. 

To enter your club's newsletter In our contest, send a copy to; EdJtorial Qt- 
fioes, 73 Magazine, Peterborougli NH 03458. 



Nov 6-7 
Nov 13 
Nov 13-14 
Nov 13-14 
Ngv 13-15 
Nov 13 15 
Nov 20-21 
Nov 20-21 
Dec 4-5 
Dec11-ia 
Dec 19 
Jan S 
Jan 9 
Jan 15-16 
Jan 15-16 



mEHOAR 



ARRL Sweepstakes— CW 

Australian Ladies' ARA Contest 

European OX Contest— RTTV 

WaLBZ QSO Parly 

North Carolir^a QSO Party 

CO- WE Contest 

ARRL Sweepstakes^ Phone 

Trlrvldad and Tobago OSO Party 

ARRL 1G0-Meter Contest 

ARRL 10 Mater Contest 

CA^F Canada Contest 

73 Magazine 40-Met#r Worldwide SSB Championship 

72 Magazine BO-Meter Worldwide SSB Champianship 

73 Magazine 160 Mater Worldwide SS3 Championship 
Hunting Lions In the Ak Contest 



114 73 Magazine • November, 1982 



All amateurs worldwide are invited ta 
p4f1tCJ(^ate. A s|>eciakQSLcatd/cei1iiJc«t« 
«rtll be sent to all wtio send th^ir QSL card 
(o 1h« Q5L Man3(jQr WQLBZ. 2909 West 
f^fkmfl Avenue, Sandusky OH 44B70, 



CQ-WE CONTEST 

Starts: 1400 GMT November 13 
Ends: 0500 GMT November 15 

Sponsored by the Bell Syatem Amateur 
Radio Fraiornity. the contest fs open to 
presom and retired employees of 8ell« 
Western Electric, AT&T, and subsidiaries 
o1 A Tit, Contact locaJ (nterworks coordi^ 
n»ior for logs and complete rules, or 
write Steve Wheatiey WNdGU£, BeiJ Lab- 
oratories, 2S2S Sh»d«lan^ Avenue. PO 
BoK tOOe, Irtdpanepolis IN 46206 Tei«> 
p^one: r3t7}-3S2~2442 at work or 
Ol7>.545-4029 at home. 



NORTH CAROLINA QSO 

PARTY 

1700 GMT November 13 to 
0200 GMT November 14 

1200 GMT November 14 to 
0100 GMT November 15 

ThJt year's party is sp€>nsored agam by 
me Alamance ARC {K4EGK The same sta- 
tiorr can be worked on each band. Cross ^ 
band and repeater contacts are noi 
permitted, 

EXCHANGE: 
BSil) and NG county or ARRL section 

SSB-39SO. 72SQ. 1428Q, 21380. 23580 
CW— €0 kN^ up from lower band ecfj|#. 



Novice/Tocti— 20 kHz up from lower 
bandedg«. 

SCOPtfNGi 

HC stations count one paint per QSO 
and multiply loU^ by eum of ARI^L 
sections. 

Otners count 2 polnie p«r NC contact 
and multiply total by number of NC coun- 
ties worked |100 rrtax^), Add a bonus Of 25 
points for working the club station, K4EG. 

AWARDS; 

The top scorer tn and out of state will re- 
ceive the !ft83 CBiibook of his/her choice. 
Ceriif fcate« 10 lop scorers m each ARRL 
S^CtlOfH. 

ENtmESr 

Send Iq^s and summary sheets sn^w- 
mg essential detaua to: F. H. Asniey 
W94M, 2731 Blanche Dr., Burllfictofl NC 
27215. Include targe SAS£ lor results. 
Mailing deadline Is Oecembef I3th. 



TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO 
QSO PARTY 

Starts: 0000 GMT November 20 
Ends: 2359 GMT November 21 

The 9Y4 OSO party has been organized 
by the Trinidad and Tobago Amateur Ra* 
dio Socieiy, Inc.. to com memo rate 20 
years of inde pen denize, 5 years as a repub- 
lic, and 50 years of amateur radio. Use all 
bands from 10 through 160 meters on 
SSB, CVV. or via satellites. 

EXCHANGE: 

The LFSuat 5- and Gf Egure sef iai number 
Signal report plus a ptogressive ^- digit 
number stariifiQ with 001. 



Nq. 

1, 
2. 
3. 

5 

6. 
7, 

a 

9. 
10. 



1 
2, 

4, 
5. 



No. 

1. 

2. 

4, 
5. 



RESULTS 



19a2 SPRING BAHTG RTTY CONTEST RESULTS 
SinglB-Op^aratof Section 



Cailslgn 


Point* 


Total 
QSDa 


W3eKT 


669196 


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At^ARDS, 

A cerHflcata wiH be awarded to any sta- 
tion working 5 or more 9Y4 or 9Y50 
stations. 

ENTRWS: 
Logs must sho* date^time m GMT. sta- 



tion worked, and number Sent/received, it 
Is requested that a remittance of $2.00 or 
IRC equivalent be Included with your log if 
you are eligible for an award. Entries must 
be postmarked no later man Decem&ar 
2tsi ar^d addressed to: TTARS. RO B09« 
1167, Port of Spam, Trinidad, Wl. 



LETTERS 




[ 



FEEDBACK 



I knott you 1 1 lie feedback, so fiere 
cornea a long-post ponetd teller. 

i still believe your magazine Is the best 
all-around ham publication, but the cost is 
starting to concern me, You needn't de- 
lend it again. I m fully aware that costs are 
contlnualiy rising. However, the saddle- 
staple binding of ihe July. 1962, edition 
definitely upset me. Is Ihare an article 
shortage? Or are costs thai high? 

Speakjng of articles. I had a few good 
Ideas for short articled, bul 1 fooled 
around ^d someone t^aat me to the 
puncti — thr&e tim«s. Ke«p encouraging 
us to write- Ev^n short articles are always 
ir?iiresting and often uMful, 

i particularly en|oy those atiout ham ra- 
dio history and electronic history in gener- 
al. I really loved that series your dad wrote 
a few years ago. la it available In booh 
form? By the way, how Is the old 
gentleman? 

In defense of your feelings about the 
code test, the July issue proves you have 
nothing against CW. I found the articles 
presented a fresh approacti to some old 
gKlgers, my favorite part of ham raOrO- 

^nc^dffn laity, I pf^f erred the table of con- 
tents cover whiefi looking up ofO arlicFes 



but I have enjoyed most of the photo cov- 
ers also. My favorite was pro&ablv Ihe 
chess board made up of vacuum tubes 
back around 1967 I once suggested a c^v^ 
er picture of sculpture made from the junk 
bon. Vou did that a few years ago. too Tm 
now working on a chess game ffom solid- 
state devices. 

Another positive comment, fsto other 
magazine I have ever seen prints such an 
excellent mix of letters — pro and con — no 
matter what the subject, 

Finally, I was very excited at>out the 
SralHe DX Service ( 'Letters^' Julyf but no 
address was given i would like to pass 
this info 10 some sight-impaifeid friends. 
Could you please publish it? 

Tom Gretmwilii K3SPV 

BalHrrtoiaMD 



Thsnks, Tom. t don't think (get ro a flam- 
/6&tat which 5omeo/}^ doesn't pu$fi m& fo 
get ttie Ancient Avis tor articte$ by my 
father into book form. Our book divistotjis 
working on thf$, stthougt^ i'd fiks to g&T 
Dad to write more about Some of the- dirty 
work which went on during the time he 
was starting tti^ first transatiAntiC Airtin& 
He's doing w^ii at 8€ spending naff of hts 
ttm9 in ftonhem New HampsAj/e antf hatt 
tn New York Hm reatiy shoutd write more- 
The saddle stftchmg ts a tittfe t^ss etpen- 



Sive than tha p^rfect^btndmg $fyf9, fwt tfie 
mam reason tor changmg was Qtir re^ 
^mphssis O0 construction articfes. The 
saddie stitched magaima ties ft&t on the 
workbefjch tor reading or butfding, while 
the perfect bound style ffops iiseifshut aii 
The time- i've been pushing the fyn of 
bwfding gadgets for over 30 years now 
and t don't intend to stop CW The only 
thmg f have agamst it is ftS tieing man- 
datory, t am convmced that tf we made it a 
matter of ham pnde, we woutdhave more 
CW ihao ever Many hams are obsimate 
p&opfe tike me. as iongas 1 am forz:edto 
do something they can go to hefL Cait ft 
Yankee petvarseness, if you ttke. 

The addr&ss you're tooking for is BDXS, 
B347 W. 6rh Ave., Lakewood CO 30215; 
(3Q3j-233'4335. — Wayne, 






INNER PROCESSES 



It is en^orabie to read such a practical 
and informative artrcieas Electric Health 
via Negative Ions" by Michael Wirtdolph 
(July. '62). I especially liked the sensible 
statement. ''Know whai you are domg and 
be careful!'' 

1 wanted to bring up a side point that 
might be of Interest to your readers. To a 
large extent, we have become so accus- 
tomed to harmful enviranments that we 
have lost touch with our original, Instinc* 
tlve Intelligence, It can be regained by pa- 
lieni. hard, and dedicated work, but U 
does take time. 

To fully regain our instinctive intetti^ 
gence (o know when someihing is wrong, 
we must not only adjust out physical en- 



vlronment bul also place our inner life in 
order, I lind best- selling author Vernon 
Howard's books very helpful tn this 
respect, Mr Howard tells us that we have 
played a wrong note for so long that we 
have forgotter^ what the right note should 
sound like,. 

Using negative ions to enrich our air is 
100% practical. To combine such simple 
and helpful projects on the practical level 
with m tense obs«rvailon of our inner pro- 
cesses would Vead to t>etter understand- 
ing of both worlds. 

Keep up the good leork. I look forward lo 
every issue. 

Totniny Bus sell 
Boulder City NV 



GEARVAKf 



] 



i can t tell you wriat a pleasant surprise 
and thrill it was to read that The GEAR- 
^AKt Bufteim had t}een selected Newslet- 
ter of tf>e Mortth for August It's gratifying 
to know that our pecuHar brand of mad^ 
ness" \^ appreciated by you folks out 
there in the real woi'td of amateur radio 
publishing. 

The Bufietin, of course, is a labor of love 
(we sure as hell don't make any money at 
It). 11 had Its beginnings back In the dis« 
tant peal when my co-conaplrators and 1 
decided that too many hams, ham organic 
nations, and ham publications tended to 
take themselves much too seriously We 
started to poke fun ai them — and our- 
selves— tnrougn the Bufiettn. 

We recognize that there is a serious 
side to amateur radio, but The BEAf^VAKt 



73 Magazine • November, 1982 115 



■^ 



Buiieifn glv^s people a chance to lake a 
"time out" With tlmiled funds and dlstth 
buHon. we'll con-linue our periotlic wachi- 
ness as long as possible. Your ^ecogni- 
Itofi hds given u$ a chance to increase our 
reaflcrfthkp 64^me. and peftiaps mo men > 
tarity ligtitefi tho Itves ot our brotlier and 
sisler hamm M fie^ps u^, too. Etiittng ttte 
pa(ii«r j^s real thefap^y! 

Any«ay, on Hetiaif of Dr. f eJiit R. One- 
hymSre<Jlori, Dr. Elwood P. Lishnys. Dt. Av 
ruet^ U. Harmshe. Ti-Graoe Gaboon, Leiati 
Utah Low^lou. and im rest of ttie GEAR- 
VAKf fuling n)ob, Itianks frorn it\e boitoms 
of om warped: lit He tiearts. 

Jq0 Ventolo, ir. K8DMZ 

Editor 

The GEARVAKt Bulletin 

Enon OH 



SACRIFICES 



Re Mr. Richafoson & betL@r in the August 
73 about rude tendencies tn ham equip- 
ment satofipeaple: 

I was tormof ly employed witti one of th^ 
larg^si ham equipment dealers in the US. 
and I'd have to say that v^rhat he says Ib 
true to a certain enleni. But give the guy 
behind the counter a break— there are a 
Isw tegilirriate reasons. 

First, lh^ saiesguy ts maHmg a big sstc* 
r[fic$ fof tHe SaNe of his job, he ha$ prob- 
ity giv0n up being an active ham. You 
can't tftlk. thintc. and eM ham radio all ^ay 
and go on the air atter work! No way. You 
gibt tNirfied out soonef or ^aier. Secondly, 
It uras rny ^xper^ence that the amount ot 
immature, rude rvardis is dispfoportion^le- 
ly l^ifthi In I he ranhs of hams as nompafed 
to tt% general population. Woe to the 
s^aiesr^an vrho sold a guy an HJ thai 
tweaks attef 9. week!' 

Vv0 nMi a guy threaten to kill me tor re- 
fusing lo return his money on a defective 
transcelvar! If you lake a radio in for &er 
vipe iTtany times, you II get incessant calls 
about its status until it s fixed, as II it'll 
gel tixed faster while the serviceman is 
busy on the phone. So many hams go ter 
S0rk when they don't have their dally radio 
(ix. you wouldn't beheve Itl 

You see guys come in, clamp a pair of 
headphones on and space out tor hour$ 
listening to the YamaguchI on display- 
without spending a dime. How many busi- 
nesses would put up with that? it you po- 
litely tell Ihem to leave, they gel mad as 
heck. Hey. wliat can you oiherwise do? 

Final ly, I ended u p gett i n g pretty d arned 
disgusted wiiri the techfiicai ignorance ot 
many hams of late. We had to wire dozens 
of mike plug^, even For Ejctrar-class hams 
As a Mtesmafi, ycu were expected to con- 
stanlty give advice on how to hang anten- 
«m&, read an swt t>ridge, or z&o-be^i a CW 
srgnat That's tme to a certain eicEent. but 



so many wouldn't take the time to pick up 
an antenna manual to find out, even to 
maybe team something. Why? If you are 
So da/nn lazy you memorized the Bash 
books ^o get your license, you're f^Ot 
about to read the arrl antenna boofs. to 
learn how to cut a dipole (which you 
should tidve known how to do in I he ftrsi 
placed. No, keep tahjr^g the easy way out 
and ask the radio shop qm^\ 

So. after «tl this and more, a sincere guy 
QT a beginning ham might come Into a ra 
dio Shop and just might get a little sr^ft* 
shrifted Sorry, guys. 

Mame and address submitted 

PS. Please withhotd my rtame fiom pf int. I 
milght decide lo go back into 1 he ham bual- 
ness alter all. (Where's my vallum?! 

By gi>lly. you're not trying to tell us that 
you think ftiat knowing the cade isn't ait 
rtiat's riBM&ct? Alt itiese n&rds who have 
b0&f7 driving you crszy have passed the 
co(Je test, so what sre you beefing stot^t^ 
Thisy m&y h^ve an Extra-cfa^s itcort^e and 
hB lihie to copy code at twenty par, tut 
Ihey can't wtre s mtke ptug, eh? Wsfh 
thst*s what most hams want us to heve. 
my fn^nd, so stop tieeting. Unfit f see 
some Bash ttooks m shreds at ham stores 
f Witt mrjfinue to beiteve ttfsf most hams 
don 'f want aftyone to know any theoty 
Of flow to buitd even the stntpfest oi stuff 
Of to know one end ot an antenna frotn 
the otftot. Your customer sTortes afe tfte 
sa/ne as I'm hearing from at I Qt the ham 
de9l»fS. I've been pushing for a change 
ffom tiepi^nding on the damned code to a 
rvai teiChntc3t test, not a Bashed one. 
wjffft no nottceable success, — Wayne, 



KEEP THE CODE 

ir; response to your com men Is about 
Having a no-code license, I was under the 
impression that amateur radio was devel 
oped "to provide a voluntary, Hon conn- 
merciai semce that provides for emergen- 
cy communications, the advancement of 
the state of radio art, and a Ifained pool of 
operators, technicians, and eiecironiCS 
ei^perta<97.1.)" 

Well, it seems to me that if we are to 
tollow this rule we should go out of our 
way as licensed hams to help people be- 
come trained operators of CW, As you 
welf know, CW can be heard when voice 
communications cannot be understood. 
Because of this^ CW can be utilized 
much more effi^cienily during emergency 
Situations. 

I teach at the Virginia School for the 
Deaf aitd Blind m Staunton, Virgjr^ia. Two 
14 yean-old girls, both visually impaired, 
passed both parts of the Nowi^ rectul?e^ 
ments tnis year and received their call tel- 
lers (KB4AHA and KB4AGZI For those 
wfio feet that the CW portion of Ihe Novice 



exam Is too haj-d, especially those who 
claim to be skilled enough to pass the 
technical portion of the Extra ctaaa exam. 
\ would like to have them talk to these two 
girls and the other 400-pluS'thousand It- 
censed hams across the United States. 

In closing, if the no-code license is ap^ 
proved, the oniy people who wiil beriefil 
3se the 2HT>eter'fig manufacturefs and 
those whio don't really catm enough about 
ham radio to take the ii:me to fe^rn one of 
the most important and useful aspects of 
amateur radio CW 

Wtlliam F. Bowman K.A4UFI 
Staunton VA 

W^tt, Bili, what you sar w^s true thirty 
years ago... maybe even twenty ysars 
ago But you >e so out of date wtth current 
technology that I don't know wh&re to 
start, Apparently you are unaware ot 
RTTY, which has been around for wett over 
30 years on the ham bands. You seem not 
to know about recefjf devefopm^nts suoh 
as integrated ctrcuits, digitai eiectrartics. 
Bhdsoon, Yes, m the dBys of spark, every- 
thing youVe written was iwe^ AlBSt we 
siilf have a surprising number of h&fns 
who are iivmg isoiated tn the old sparh 
days. — Wayne. 



issue is an Indication of better Nam ra- 
dio articles to come. 

Kow^ if you could |ust come out with a 
blockbu ster RTTV 1 ssue like you d id a cou- 
ple of years back! 

ViiiceSlilloWB2FYZ 
llion NY 

The September tssue was packed with 
HTJY §oo<ite:Sr and tet m* make itpertect- 
tf clear (w com a phrasal that l think thai 
the future of hammmg fs tted tn wtth dig^ 
tat commumcatioits, . and that's flTTV i 
want to putffiSh articles on higner and 
htgher-speed digitat communtcations:. oh 
errorcorrectrng code systems, Ofl a&ifQ- 
matic fefaying. and so ott. If enough of us 
chip in ipam. perhaps we can S9t up some 
international reiay system which wtffbeot 
immense value m emergencies We might 
even think about an organiiattofi whtch 
coufd be cafted the Infernationai Radio 
Refay Leagued The mind boggies. Any- 
way, giad you enioyed the issue, and yes, 
well be having a tot more interesting con- 
struct ion proiects,— Wayne, 



NO THANKS 



PRICED OUT 



These days, rrxist countries. parti£til^- 
ly Canada, have serious money problems, 
but e^fen m our pom econamic cood^tiori 
we haven't been reduced lo the point 
whore we have an of JiciaJ ^4-cent coin. 

I know ttie true value of our penny may 
not even tie worth half of its face value, 
bu! it seemed very funny to me lo see on 



Jusi a short note to state that I have. 
ovef a period of ^ or 5 or 6 months^ helped 
upwards of 50 hams and others through 
your "Hain Help" cotumn (pariicuiarly on 
otder receivers, transmitters etci. 

Sad lo &ay. onty about 8 have even bottv 
efed 10 reply and ihank me, o' at least leti 
rue lo "get lost" 

Kind of maices you wondec. 

Roy H. WItkinscHi 
SloomlfiQlon tAH 



the cover of your August. 1965. msueiaea/i^^ ' ^^^^ ^ '""'^^ ^"«' batling aver- 
that the pnceof the magazine was printed^' ^^e' with the readers oJ Popular Electron- 



price ot me magazine was printed 

Either the proofreader missed It, Or ybti 
have decided to print an errof deliberately 
to see how many people feally read it 
"from cover to coverJ.' r ,\f^ ' 

t %L "1 ^^' rffn*mAutey VE3f(flV0 
jH_ ^ Ale)tandria^ Ontatfo 

W& have an opening tor a new proof mad- 
er. . . any takers'? — Waym^ 



LAID OUT 

Your new Cover layout for the August 
issue of 73 fSaganne is ^reat. Plus, I 
was glad to see that the a/licie^ were 
more m line with the 7d 0I a coupie 
yea,rs ago. I was beginning to have my 
doubts about T3. as the articles seemed 
lo tK getting away from ham radK) some- 
what. Having hes^n a suls'scriber to ^3 in 
eMcess of ten year^, I hope the August 



ics* ' Operatfon Assist*" column. Also. I 
miss your "want ads" column! 

ftoy, the pface for your ham ads is (n a 
ham ed paper, not a magazme. It takes 
attorn three months to print a hem ad trr & 
magazine and by that time the stutt is usu- 
atty sold The ham ad papt^fs get the adS 
out there in a couple weeks itod do & nice 
fob ot it. i reaHy hate ^o tuki) bread out of 
the mouth of smalt entrepfefteufs by com- 
peting with them in 73, so I urge a ft read- 
ers to use the spectatty pabiicafions and 
keep them healthy. I wish th&t QST would 
do that, too. You'tt note that we don't try to 
compete with CO magaitne and their spe- 
ctait7ed coverage ot contests. Sure, rhete 
are onfy a couple thousand hams who are 
S&nousty tnlerested tn contests, but those 
who are should read ana support the put^ 
ticatton dedicated to therrt , , which is 
CO. / don t know wnat to say a&ot/f the ttff- 
grateful cretins wtto get help and then say 
nothing. — Wayne 



RTTY LOOP 



Marc L Leavey, M.D. WA3AJR 
4006 Wlnlee Road 
Randaflstown MD 21133 

One of the questions raised a few 
rrronths back regarding the design of a ra- 
dioteletype receive program was how to 
make such a recel^r immune to gart^age or 
noisy slgnalSv This month tit take a look at 



one lechrilque which can be used to over- 
come «uch a prchlem: multiple sampling. 

Recall that each data pulse In a 
BO- w pin fyluRay character, of which there 
are five, lasts lor 21 ms Mechanical tele- 
printers do not use the entire pulse, but 
rather a small sample ot it. Where this 
sample window is positioned depends 
upon the adtustment of the range selec* 
tor. Thai is. only a small slice of each 



d^ta pulse IS read m order to determine 
whether that pulse is a mark or a space 
Fig. 1 shows how this window overlaps 
Ihe longer data pulse. Since mechanical 
printers tim« the "inlra-putSe'^ interval 
from the position of the window on the 
data pulse, advancing the window towaid 
the beginning of the pulse will enable the 
ne><l pulse to be read that much sooner 
and can allow speeds slightly greater 
than 60 wpm lo be read. II Is by using this 
technique that so-called "66-speed" ma- 
chines can be copied on an otherwise un- 
modified Model t5. 

In an analogous fashion, simple RTTV re- 
ceive programs such as those described 
here in the past sample each data pulse on- 
ty once and use that Information to racon- 



strucl ttie Murray charadef. With ttw rou- 
tines presented a tew years ago* lor evam^ 
pie. a mon^ntary sample from the middle 
of each puJse was obtained. A delay of 30 
ms between samples kept the windows po- 
sitioned neai the middteof each data pulse. 

The difficulty with such a scheme is that 

nopse or fading can distort individual pulses 
within a character, thus changing the inter- 
pretatioa A simple solution \B lo look at 
each pulse not I us I onca, but several times, 
and base the decision of what to call that 
pulse on the sum of those samplings Regu^ 
lar samples can be taken at, say, two-ms in- 
tervals to produce a time scheme such as 
shown m Fig. Z 

Having sampled each pulse marty times 
and presuming we have stored that inlof- 



116 73Maganrte • November J 982 



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*^See Ust oi AttwertiSer^ on page t30 



73 Magazine • November, 1982 117 



fcnr DATA 



WaWGL ILLtnOfi Sr»MPL£ WINDOWS 



ftg. ^ Th9 ^^mpie window 







1 1T fi n f 












ftTTT 04T« 




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MULTIPLE SAMPLE WINDOWS | | { | J 


UULJU 



fig. ?. Computer's muitipfe sampies 



matron tn som« u&abke format, we rriu^i 
ndw decide whni to do with rtiat knowt- 
«dge- Unless 1h« circuit being momtofed i^ 
in absolutely clftar cJiannel, 4t ifi doutitliil 
tlxat all teri (lit this exa^ptei samples will be 
ictefiiicaL tn the case ol pure rvotae. one 
might expect an aven^s ol hati mark and 
h^lt space^ so a threilio^d would seem ap- 
propriate 1o adjuclicat^ wtien to caSI a given 
puise 'marhJ when "space/' and when to 
l!no* It out For want of a better sugges- 
tJon. I&t's seiEleon seven of more aaniples 
one vyay or the other to label a state. BeRd- 
Ing less than se^en pulses of either maf k or 
space will render the Individual bjt rrasfi. 

So you have a trash pulse, now what^ II 
woutd seern that Ihete are at least 1 wo way& 
lOCteal wftti ttiat Eittier you arbitrarily as- 
sign It as a mark or space aiMl laXe yoiir 
chances with thre character, or you decide 
the entire charact^ i% k>si artd |us1 loopOiJt 
\h& tirne The latter appeals to me INr most, 
alter all— garbage is gaibage. no? In orf^of 
to implement that, all you would need to do 
is keep track of how rnany bits you have 
read and delay whistever ts lef ! to get to the 
ri@x1 stop bit, 

I don't know how conlusing that all is 
when you read (t: It was not all that ctear in 
the writing. I rhink that Fkg. 3. a f low c haft ot 
whal I am talking about, will lielp clear 
tilings up, though The character reception 
reuttrte is entered with a bit coun|«r s^ al 
five, tt^ number of pulses in a Murray char- 
acter AHbt detection ot a start pulse, addi 
ticmaP counters for n^ark and space are $at 
up and cleared. A loo|t is entered to sample 
eacN puJse ten limes and roister ttie slate 
of tfie pulse sampled in the approprjatQ 
counter After ten samples have tseen tak- 
en, the counters are (examined tc determine 
I he probable identily of the pulse and re- 
cord that in the correct position Assuming 
aJi Has gone well Ihusfar, the sampling pro- 
cess is repealed for each of it>e live data 
btis. and the Murray character transmtlted 
IS recovered. 

However, wi^at if a tut is m error? What I 
have directed r^ere is fo tra?^ ir« entire 
ehafacter. We do that by branching toa rou- 
lifW wtiicti waits out the remainmg bits' 



a 



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SAMPLE COUNT 



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Sit count CD 




5tT I'ul.St 
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HELAT BEST 

QF CHARiACTER 



te: 



c 



EXsr WITH huLL 



3 



ITH CIURACTER 



Fr§ 3. Multiple ssmpie tlowcttafi 



time and kUsa exits with a null Pot the re- 
ceived characiet One presumes I hat the 
translatton scherne used will ignore sucf> a 
character. 



Tlite type of scheme is useful to ellmi- 
naitng etrofteous characters where the er- 
ror is generated teti/^een transmission and 
reception. For (tK>se errors generated on 



the operator side of the keyboard, you are 
on your own' 

Turning to the mailbag, I have a noie here 
from Leo F. McAufillt. Jr.. of Ashfdnd, 
Mlassachusmts, 'Mho is a stiortwave listen 
er interested m copying FTTTY Leo is looh- 
ing lor a ctevioe which wiM display received 
RTTV on a TV screen, without having to in- 
west a lot ot money Well. Leo. as you may 
have appreciated tn I he pages of ads here 
in 73, there is not a lot on tJie market to do 
whal you ask Those units that are commer- 
clalEy available cost savmat hundreds of 
dollars, which you indicate is oul of your 
range. I might suggest two possible eiter- 
natives. One would be to scout the ham- 
tests m your aiea lor an older used, video 
RTiV unii, such as an okS Microiog receivef. 
These w^ie madt some ye^s back ar^J 
sh<Hiid be turmng up for reasonable pricsa 
on ttieftea-maiket circutl. Anoltier Htea ts to 
put togett>.er a small unit youfself. uSJ^ng a 
dedicated compuier, costing under StGQ. 
and an ASCII video display. Such displays 
may be old terminals or receive display 
boards, none of which should cost too 
much. For some time and elbow grease, 
you may be quMo happy with what you will 
come up with. If there is suf tici^nl inlerest, I 
would be willing to work out the design ot 
such a unit Let me know with, as they used 
to say on the tube, your cards and letters 

ArfMmg tfie new arrivals tiere ai WA3AJR 
ts anoifieT computer, an Atan 4O0. 1 bought 
t1 lof itiB kids, but yoii know wtio ts at Itw 
keyt>oard rnore and more- I am impressed 
by the pfogrammability of this urtit and 
hope that we wilt be able to use it on ham 
redio. I will keep my eyes open tor applica- 
tions, and I hope you do, too. J Jook torwerd 
to Sharing wi|h you ^hatevef we all can dis- 
cover In future columns. 

Next month, some more invest Fgatlons 
into the design ol the itieal RTTY terminal 
program, as well as a look at what some 
of you are saying Winter is a great time 
ro work in I he sliacii. even thougt^ ihese 
now IransisloftiedJtCized rigs don't put 
oul the heal oi a pair ot IHI7s Let's see 
what kind ol Ihtngs we can do m next 
month's RTTY Loop, 




Chod Hams VP2ML 
Box 4681 

Santa Rosa CA 95402 

THE TOP TEN 

What are the Top Ten? No, not the besi 
selling rock and-roll records, but then^ost 
sought-alter counirtes in the DX world 
Every year The OX Bufiefm surveys the top 
DXers in this country and other countries 
to determine which countries are most 
needed The QX Bafi^tm concentrates on 
those OXers with more than 250 countries 
worked and is the most preslrgious of all 
the bulletins- Its Top 73 list ts the fnc»st 



complete and well-r^pectedot any such 
list in th-e world. Some amateur radio mai^- 
ufacturers determine who will receive DX- 
pedition ngs on the basts ol this survey 
T"rte DX Battmm recently granted permis- 
sion lor this column to reproduce the 1982 
list of I he rnost needed counirles. Here Is 
the list, wUh cornments on future amateur 
radio activity. (For further information on 
The DK Buifeiin, write 305 Vernon Avenue, 
Vernon. Conneciicut 0€£366 ) 

1 . ChmM BY China tops everyone $ most 
wanted iist« with almc^t no legal amateur 
radio Since the early i95Gis. iut that is 
cti anting (see this column^ July). Mor^ BY 
stations are coming on the air, and BY 



will move dO'^rx the most wanted list in fu 
lure y^ars. Not rapidly, but^lt mH slowly 
move down until everyone has worked BY, 

2. VK/H^ard. This imy rock near Antarc 
UCa will host one or two major DXpedi 
tions in 1963. Watch Heard drop com 
ptctely off the most wanted list next year 

31 VUfL^ccatiives Theonty island worth 
landirrg on in this archipelago ts the l^se 
of considerai>(e pirate activity No. not ^a 
dio pirates, but real itfe pirates who don i 
leave live victims No one in his right rnmd 
goes anywhere near the Laccadives. 

4. Aib&nm ZA. IT s the political climate 
thai keeps amateur radio out of AlbanJa. 
As one of the poorest of the Eastern Euro- 
pear> countries and one close to the Sovi- 
ets. Albanta has taken a dim view of ham 
radio for years. There are signs of a sort- 
ening ol Ihis attitude, tvowever, and ru- 
mors continue to fly of a OXpedition to Al- 
t»nia any day now Don' I hold youf 
ixeath. but don i hesitate to work any ZA 
you might heaf- 

5 Csmbodta XU Political tyrmorl and 



Oivll war precSude n^m radio from Cambo- 
dia, orticial permlsfiion Is unlikely in Ihe 
near future; we'll Just have to wait unlll 
ihmgs calm down 

6. Sauth Yemen 70. A simitar casn to Al^ 
banta- South Vemen is In theScniei camp, 
arK3 thev don't endorse amateur radio 

7 fiotnref JY Another liny island near 
Antarctica. Bouvet sees occastonat tour 
^st arvd scientitic tralftc. Pennission ftom 
Horway can be obtained, and Bouvet 
might well t>e a target of a expedition 
soon, but probably not this winter 

8. Ano'amans VU At least one amateur 
is listed as havrng a license for the Anda- 
mans^ but activity has heen nonsxistent. 
The Indian ruiesproveni ouisideamateurs 
from getting licenses, and the Egcals don't 
seem to show enough interest in activat- 
ing one of the rarest of alt DXCC 
countries. 

9. Surma XZ. The official Burmese 'gov- 
ernment says No* to any amateur radto^ 
and the ARRL refuses to accept theopera- 
ilons from the "rebel" north hall of the 



118 73Magaime • November. 1982 



BEEPEB ni 



*\^ 



''THE PROFESSIONAL TOUCH 
COMES TO AMATEIXH RADIO!" 



'°BP-^li,Mtoni&t.ioaiiy prnvidiw A g«riU$ high ire- 
ftumncy basp at the b^glnnLnfl <i( emch irananns- 
sU3n uuj « Ipv bsep at Uim itid. ViitualJ^ flluni- 
rulM '"uik-otEr"! Opd-^alii* for up to one 7^4^ 
mi * ai|i|£l« 9-V boKSer? (noi ■uppUwli Ckn be 
rtinotly Lntarfaoed to anjr Uttnici«tv«r whidi is 
ii-«3r«d hj grounding the PTf Un* Itlut FIT ime 
TolUifle ranBi be pcisaiT«, inot ^nat«r than ^ 
VDC mil' ^0 currBni. gretamt yk&n 100 cda^i 
TtfnrlCB miXh inxtasHj ill modlem ^MT Yitu't^ 
FiitsM it, now jpcHi can ha^ &*" 



14 



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73 Magazine * November J982 119 




A gaggf0 of FOQi^. Did you worHS }^08 srsffo/is on two different bands during their Tiurai 
ceiepration July 14-22? ff 50, ybu quafity /or a special award, hut you must request the 
award before the end of the year J 5 actfve FOSs made more thitn 5000 QSOsdaring the 
ceiebration. {F08GM photo courtesy of WBSGFJj 



country. This poiiticai mesS shows no 
signs of betng straightened out in the 
foreseeable future. 

10. 3an Feifx CB0X. Getting a license is 
trivial (I have one), but getting onto the is- 
land Is Impossible. The entire Island is a 
military base (Tike Aves in Ihe Cdiribbean) 
and "gringoes" are not wetcome. Even the 
Chileans tiave been unable lo convince 
the mllitarv higher-ups thai ihey mean no 
harm in their planned DXpeditiort. A re- 
cent "operation" from San Felix turned in- 
to a fiasco iwhen the Chileans claimed the 
operator was nowhere near the island at 
the time This could breaK at any time, bul 
I rate it doubtful, 

The main difference Jn this list from a 
similar one twenty years ago is in (he rea- 
sons iQT lack of activity from a country 
Twenty years ago the reaso!r>& were physi- 
cal inaccessibiliiv and lack of transporta- 
tion and accommodations in ttie country. 
It's hard to mount a DXpedition wh&n you 
have to pack your gear, generators, and 
foel In on camels- The transportation pic- 
ture has changed for the better, and no 
spot on Ihis earth is out of reach of a de- 
termined arnateur. 

But the poJItJcai realities have changed 
for the worse. Certain cheats and frauds 
In the last 20 years and increasing sensi- 
tivity 10 teelings in developing countries 
have led to a more formal approach to the 
documentation needed for a DXpedition 
to "count" lor PXCC The cor^servative at- 
titude of ihe ARRL DXCC staff means an 
amateur cannot simply operate trom a 
country; he must be welcomed by that 
country and operate with iheir full cooper 
ation. Thts is simpty impossible in many 
countries. Many emerging countries are 
reluctant lo put anything down in writiingj 
although they are eager to give verbal per- 
mission lo operate, 

Another reason for ihe retuctance of 
countries to permit even visitmg amateurs 
to operate is the fear of spying^ internal re- 
volt, or outside lal^eover, all of which re- 
quire radto communications. EJnsophisti- 
cated customs officials cannot differenti- 
ate between spy gear and a TS-S30, (On 
second ihoughi, are there any real differ- 
ences^) So ft IS stnnpler always to say 
"No" than to see if it is possible to say 
"Yes." We probably won't see this atti- 
tude change quickly. Only patient demon- 
strations and years of support, documen- 
tal ton. and assistance will win jittery gov- 
ernments over to the value of amateur ra- 
dio^ as we see happening In China. 



What does this mean for the DXer? If 
you want to get on the Honor Roll (having 
worked almost all the DXCC countries), 

you must have patience. It may be marty 
years betore we see significant radio op- 
erations from many of the Top Ten. 

If you do hear one of tliese higiily de- 
sired countries on the air and are fortu- 
nate enough to work i(t, the battle is only 
half over. Now you have to get a QSL card 
lo prove you worked him. 

QSLS AND QSLING 

There is more to DXmg than working the 
DX station, getting iheconfirmation of the 
contact can be every tsit as challeng ing as 
breaking through the plleup. But a few 
hints and suggestjons can substantially 
improve your QSL percentage and get 
some of those coveted pasteboards "on 
the wall." 

In this first part ot this series on QSUng 
we will consider Ihe card itself: Ihe selec- 
tion, design, and print ing of your own QSL 
card. In future columns we will advise how 
to fill out the card, how to get the card to 
the appropriate place, and QSL bureaus. 

Your PerSDhat 05L Card 

There are no rules requiring that ac- 
knowledgement 1 a DX contact must be 
in the form ol a postcard-si^ed paper. QSL 
means acknowledgement of a contact, 
not a special card. But everyone who 
seeks those aoJ^nowledgemenis uses the 
universally accepted QSL card. In more 
than 100.000 requests for my QSLs, I have 
never received a request without such a 
card. Only a tiny handful have been other 
than postcard'Sized- So while there are no 
formal requirements for the dimensions 
of the QSL I recommer>d sticking lo the 
standard format. 

Choosing Your Card 

Given the transient nature ot most DX 
QSOs, the DX station has little opportuni- 
ty to get to know you. It theOSLing is han- 
dled by a QSL manager, the person tilling 
out your return card will know even less 
about you So your QSL card reflects your 
personality and amateur radio interests 
even more ttian your DX contact. 

When the time comes to choose your 
QSL card, you first have to decide on a 
custom card or an off-the-sheif commer- 
cial card. There are dozens of commercral 
QSL card printers. Most otfer a set of sam- 
ples and designs for a nominal fee. Once 



upon a time the QSL printers would obtain 

the FCC list of new licensees and send 
you a set of samples and order forms be- 
fore you even received 'your license! You 
were so pleased to learn your caiisign that 
you Immediately ordered 1000 of their fan- 
ciest cards. 950 of these are probably still 
gathering dust in your basement. 

The advantages of commercial QSL 
printers are many. They produce a good 
looking card at relatively small expense. 
The card is easily recognisable as a QSL 
and it is printed on stock heavy enough to 
go through the mall as a postcard. Prices 
range upward from a few cents a card. 
You can select from a bewildering variety 
of cards, including multi-colored cards, 
two-sided cards^ and more. Ordering your 
commercial QSLs is trivial: Vou pfck your 
design, fill in the blanks on the form, and 
send in your money. Vou will get your 
cards back in a few weeks— longer if you 
use one of the smaller printers. 

But for OX ing, standard QSL designs 
have one major disadvantage: They are alt 
the same. No, not identical, but ar^ active 
DX station who receives thousands of 
QSLs each year will have seen dozens or 
hundreds ot similar cards. Your card will 
be one of the pack; It won t stand out. 
Some hams try to make their cards stand 
out by using bright orange QSLs that glow 
in the dark. I still see spots before my eyes 
from opening an envelope with one of 
these DayGlo orange QSLs. But I have re- 
ceived bunches of these, too Certain QSL 
designs are so popular that I have re- 
ceived hundreds of cards Identical except 
for the callsign. Needless to say, I am not 
intrigued to receive yet another one of the 
same design. 

This doesn't mean that standard design 
QSLs end up in the circular file. It juat 
means that they gel answered just like 
any other QSL, no faster or slower. The 
call and the Individual operator will not be 
remembered any length of lime. 

The cards (and operators) who do stick 
in the mind after the QSL is answered are 
those personal cards, cards which say 
something about the ham and his station. 

If you do decide on a c ommercia I iy- pro- 
duced, standard QSL card, there are a few 
things to keep In mind when making your 
selection. First, avoid commercially pro- 
duced two-sided cards. These are the 
cards with the personal information on 
one side (callsign, name, and address) 
and a standard QSL form on the reverse. 
Why avoid these? The DX station must 
first find your OSO in his log. This means 
comparing the time of the QSO on the 
back of the card and the callsign on the 
front with his pages and pages of log. 
Sometimes the card must be flipped sev- 
eral times before the QSO is located in the 
log. Then, In order to fill out the return 
card, the DX operator must first record the 
QSO information and then turn the card 
over to get the callsign. Big deal, you say. 
How difficult Is it to turn the card over? 
Flipping one or two or ten or a hundred 
cards is no btg deal. But when you deal 
with thousands and thousands of cards, 
the OSLer soon learns to dread the sight 
of another two-sided card. 

Two-sided cards also lead to possible 
errors on your return QSL. In the process 
of flipping the card, the OX station might 
forget the call, or transpose two letters, 
etc. The result might be a QSL card which 
will be rejected by the DXCC checkers. 

This does not mean that all two-sided 
QSL cards are useless for DX purposes. 
There is nothing wrong with a card which 
has the call and name on one side and the 
QSO information on the reverse, as tong 
as lire caii^ign aiso appears on the re- 
verse. Then the DX station i|or QSL manag- 
er) doesn't have to flip the card; the call- 



sign Is right there on the reverse with the 
QSO information. But few commercially- 
available two-sided cards offer this op- 
tion. It requires custom printing of both 
sides of the card, greatly increasing the 
costs, and eliminating many of the econo- 
mies of scale of QSL printing. So if you En- 
tend to do a lot of DXIng, stick with single- 
sided QSL cards. 

Another thing to check when you pur- 
chase commercial cards is the glossy fin- 
ish. Many of these very handsome and at- 
tractive finishes will not absorb ir^k from 
felt tip pens. The Ink puddles up and 
smudges off. Hard pencils may make a 
very light trace on some coated cards. 
Test your sample cards with your usual 
writing utensil. Does the pen make a clear, 
clean impression which doesn't smear? 
Not all shiny cards have this problem; you 
have to check the sample. 

Another possible problem with com- 
mercial QSLs is the use of strange type- 
faces. Some amateurs choose an exotic 
typeface for their consign and address, 
one that is different, on the hope that It 
will make their standard card more dis- 
tinctive. Don't! These weird typefaces are 
often difficult to read. Typefaces that look 
like script or brush strokes are especially 
difficult to read. What difference does It 
make, you ask? If your callsign is dif f icuft 
to read, the DX station might get it wrong. 
Then he might not find it in the log, or he 
might fill out your QSL to someone else's 
call! For the same reason avoid those 
ubiquitous silver-on black QSLs. They are 
very difficult to readl 

Custom QSLs 

I personally prefer custom-designed 
QSLs, both to send and to receive, i feel 
the QSL card Is an extension of your ama- 
teur radio personality, and it should say 
something about you and your amateur 
career. Custom-designed QSLs need not 
be elaborate or expensive, and the initlaf 
effort quickly pays off in Improved 
returns. 

What should go onto your personal 
OSL? iVIake sure you have the basic infor- 
mation: your callsign, name; and address 
mciuding county, You will also need 
blanks for the QSO informatJon, tf you 
work one mode or band predominantly, 
you might want to customize the QSO in- 
formation. For example, a 20-meter enthu- 
siast might have "Freq. 14 MHz." 

Be sure to say that this card is a confirma- 
tion of the QSO described; many commer- 
cial cards omit this vital line. 

I have used both the box format and a 
sentence format for the QSO information, 
and I definitely recommend the former. 
The sentence lormat fi.e,, "This confirms 

our 2X QSO on on MH? 

at UTC, with your signals 

RST.-'li is cumbersome and very prone to 
error. The box format is clean and easy to 
till in and read. Amaieurs seem to be able 
to make the simplest task complicated 
and so produce a bewildering number of 
combinalions of these QSO information 
boxes. For consistency and to assist the 
person filling out the return card. \ sug- 
gest the following format: Callsign. Date, 
UTC, MHz (not hand), 2X(mode). RST. If 
you are designing your own card from 
scratchj be sure to leave enough space in 
each of the boxes for the required infor- 
mation. In other words, the boxes for the 
callsign and date should be substantially 
larger than those for the other informa- 
tion Better yet, take a blank QSL with 
well-designed boxes and steal the format. 

Another important "tern to include on 
your custom QSL is a request for the DX 
statiorf's card. You would be amazed at 
the number of QSLs I have received with- 
out such a request. Since I receive and 



120 73Magazme • November, 1982 



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73 Magazine ■ November, 1982 121 



m 



tend thousands of ca/ds each ^ear, I 60 
noi an&wof card* Itiat rfont tiave a specif- 
ic requ&st fw irty card; 1 a^syma tfi^ card 
19 an answflf Ip a cam l serit. By in« way. 
avoid mose cute OSLs with ttie OSO ^nfor- 
maiion htdden on a drawing ol a rtp, eic 
Anything (hai mak«5 ti^E OSO information 
hard to find or dacjpnar wm alow up your 
return card^ 

So rnirch for the outs and boHs of QSL 
card daaign. What (bout th^ overall lopkT 
What personal Information will customize 
your QSL7 A photograph of yourself at 
your operating position with QSLs and 
aw9fds in th« background says rtiortt 
about you ttian any ainounl of ttxt. A 



good photograph shows your«dulpmefit, 
station layout, your moat prixad awards, 
and (vflty important} adds a face to your 
call. My favorite 0SL£ to recskve are defi- 
nitely photograph ic QSLs, becau&e thay 
say so much about the operator without 
listinQ hundreds of awards no Of^e has 
ever heard of, 

The major drawback to a photographic 
QSL la the qonslderable Initial expense. 
But [f you can find a friend who will take a 
good black-and-white photograph, you 
can save a good part of the cost. Thera is 
usually at least one good photographer In 
every radio club. 

What atwut listing your equipment and 



antennai on the QSL? Every ti^s I have 
dona thjs^ I have crtange<i the gea/ as 
soon aa the cards come back from the 
pf inter. If you trade your equipn^nt regu- 
larly and try new antennas ever^ season, 
you ahould leave the listing of gear off the 
card. If you are sat Isf led with your Collins 
gear and Big Bertha, by all means Mst the 
equipment; the OX station Is always in- 
terested In knowing what pfoducdd that 
strong signal. 

Once your card 1 9 designed, there re- 
maina the choice of now to prim It. Some 
of the QSL printers w^l I produce a custom 
card from your sketch, but expect to pay 
ior their semcas. I pref«f Ihe quick'print 
Approach, as f usuiMy print many 



thousand a of cards ai a tima, and the 
quick-print atKips will produca a card for 
less than a penny apiece. 1 provldo 
carr>era-ready copy and the printer prints 
four cards on aach she«t Of paper and 
cuts them Into QSL Sliced cards. (Postal 
Servica requirements insist on a certain 
minimum size for p03tcard$; check this 
before you have the cards trimmed. A(so 
make sure your card will fft into a stan- 
dard small envelope without folding,) 

Whatever format or type of QSi card 
you select, you still have to fill 1 1 out prop- 
erly, get It to tha correct Individual, and 
g«t his card back. We'll diacusa theae 
other steps on OSLifig in future months. 



AWARDS 



GLADESPEDITION 

The Fort Myers Amateur Radio Club will 
be conducting a ''Gfadespedltion" to 
Glades County, f^iorida Operations will 
iMgin on November 13, 1982. W4LX will be 
opsfating in tne General bands, boih CW 
and SS&. Some Novice contacts wlU also 
be made, if you need Giades County, be 
fture to look for them. QSL loi David Fox 
KA8CXQ. PO Box 051131. Ttce FL 33905. 
SAS£ please. 

45th PARALLEL 

The Tri^County Wireless group will minl- 
0)C from Gayford. Michigan, on the 45th 
paraltel ^halfway between the e<|uator %n4 
the north pole) from 1400Z l4ovemt>er 13 
ttuo4igh 0600 November 14 Phon« only at 
3.ffl5, 7Ji50. 14.300. 21.375, and 23.550. 
Certificfil« lor OSL and SASE to NdOOY. 

ABCTV 

the ABC'TV Washington Engineering 
Group, celebrating the first year of opera- 
tion from the network's new Washington 
news bureau, wiil be on the air SaturdayK 
November 13, from 1400Z to 22QQZ. on 
^B frequencies {plU9 or minus S kNx): 
7.245 and 14.285 and on CW for Novice 
and Technician contacts on 7.t?5 (listen- 
ing at 45 minutes past each hour). 
K&7Z2/3 will also be on 145.190 FM 
(WSDOSfRt throughout the operation peri- 
od. Special events QSL3 via business-size 
SASE to: Steve Malls KA40RL. 2520 
H^dthcllft Lana, Reston VA 20O91. 

JERSEY DEVIL STATION 

The West Jersey Radio Amateurs 
(WJi^) will mount a second operation 
from the South <Jer$ey Pine Barrens, the 
tIMint of the reared Jersey Dsvil Begin- 
ning and ending at midnight, the coura- 
geous WJ^ group will attempt again this 
yBSr to operate tne entire 24 hours of Hal- 
loween, October 3tei. A unique, hand- 
some certiticaie engraved with a counte- 
nance of the Jersey Devil will be sent to all 
Stations worked who send an SASE to 
WJRA. PO Bom 62, Burlington NJ OSOia 
Frequencies to be used are 15 KHz Tram 
the bottom of each General phone bond, 
80 through 2 meters, and 146.55 FM. Nov* 
ice operation wMi aisg be 15 kHz up. 

The Jersey Devil was born in 1735, a 
13th Chi id. in the Pine Barrens of Suriing- 
ton County at a place caiied Leeds Point, 
Not long after kts birth, on a foggy and 
dreary night so usual in the Pine Barrens, 
the chHd assumed a serpent4ihe body« 



cloven hoof 4, the head of a horse, wings 
of a bat. and the forked tali of a dragon, 
With loud raucous cfiea, it ft«w up the 
chimney and into the heart of the Pine- 
lands. Appearances and sight I nigs occur 
even today. On Halloween, the WJRA will 
maintain a radio vigil tryinp once again to 
capture a glimpse of the Devli Wlil they 
see hjm? Give them a call— W2 JUG— and 
get a first- hand report. 

73MAGAZmE 
AWARDS PROGRAM 

WORK THE WORLD 



97 W06DFM 
96 HN4^ 
99 WA2WRD 

100 NSBDI 

101 WB9NOV 

102 KA3DB1M 

103 K9GHP 

104 W»YBV 

105 KA7GIN 

106 WBHTM 

107 NSATS 
10a KC5TK 
109 K3STIW 
ItO 9G1RT 

111 WA2LYF 

112 ZS6ABA 

113 VK2H0 

114 VE3LVN 

115 VE1ACK 
Its PY2BTR 
117 VE3JPJ 

116 HC2RG 

119 WA9IVU 

120 VK2NHV 

121 KH6KU 

122 N5CSW 

123 WN5MBS 

124 AK1H 

125 VH3BMA 

NORTH AM 

213 wcsm 

214 KH6KU 

215 KSRNR 

216 VE1YX 

217 WN5MBS 

218 VK3BMA 

219 WB7UCU 

220 4Z4VQ 

221 PYtBVY 

222 OEM 11080 

223 WTGLU 

224 ilWVXY 

225 VK30Xy 
22^ 4W 16260 
227 VK2PV 
22t OE2ABM 
229 KftLST 



126 WB7UCU 

127 KA3FUU 
t28 W04JE0 
t29 W7GUJ 

130 VH2PY 

131 VK3DXy 

132 Ke2WH 

133 itWXY 

134 K3WUR 

135 KA1RC 

136 Py2CAR 

137 HEEW 
I3fi KtlST 

139 HI3LRB 

140 2L1S2 

141 ZS6XS 

142 zsaxK 

143 PY2FK 

144 JFlCPH 

145 W1SIX 

146 PA9TP 

147 JJlKTi 
143 W3BHM 
149 JA5MG 
160 JFISEK 
151 KA(&iVIMD 

152 apflov 

153 KGSAU 



ERICAN 
230 
231 
232 
233 
234 
235 
236 
237 
238 
239 
240 
241 
242 
243 
244 
245 
24e 



AWARD 

VE7DRI 

HEEW 

waSHM 

PY2CAR 

KA2IAL 

KA1RC 

KA9MMD 

VVOSIBM 

Wa2VTD 

N4CXK 

N7CZH 

N5AUB 

KA2JJK 

H!3AMF 

PY2FK 

K2Y0F 

PY2ftHL 



24? K9UP 
24a HI3LRB 

249 W9CC 

250 ZL1SZ 

251 KA9CEJ 

252 2S6XS 

253 ZS6XK 

254 PAaTP 

255 PAf»EM 

256 VV9CC 

257 PY1EWN 

SOUTH 

136 N5GSW 
187 KH6KU 
1B8 R9RNR 

189 WN5MBS 

190 DA IAS 

191 VK3BMA 

192 WB7UCU 

193 424VG 

194 PYIBW 

195 WA9AH2 

196 VV7GLU 

197 WBUMP 
196 VK2PY 

199 VK30XY 

200 I1WXY 

201 ht5AUB 

202 N7CZH 

203 r44CXK 

204 AI1Y 
206 KAIRC 

206 Py2CAR 

207 W3BHM 

208 IIEEW 

209 KIILST 

210 HI3AMF 



258 JFlCPH 

259 JJ1KT1 

260 VE6C!S£V 

261 i5H0R 

262 PY2RAN 

263 KA5FLE 

264 PY10WM 

265 JF1SEK 
236 JA5MG 
2«7 KC8AU 
268 N6GBM 

AMERICAN AWARD 

211 PY2FK 

212 K9LJP 

213 HOLIES 

214 WOOAQC 

215 2L1S2 

216 KAdCEJ 

217 ZS6XS 

218 ZS6XK 
22 T W9CG 

222 KA9MMD 

223 JFlCPH 

224 WtSiX 

225 PVZiEM 

226 PAilP 

227 JJ1KTI 

228 ZL2LQ 

229 KA2J4K 

230 8P60V 

231 JFISEK 
?32 JASMG 

233 KCQAU 

234 N5ACU 

235 VE6CNV 

236 N6GBM 



ASIAN 

142 N5CSW 

143 KM6KU 

144 W7GLU 

145 WD4JEQ 

146 WB7UCU 

147 VK3BMA 

148 DAUS 

149 AK1H 
160 W1SIX 
151 WN5MBS 

1S2 iiwxy 

153 KB2WH 

154 eP60V 

155 VK3DXY 

156 HZ- 16260 

157 4W- 16260 

158 VK2Py 

159 PY2CAR 

160 KAIRC 

161 MEEW 

162 KOLST 



AWARD 

163 PY2FK 

164 N4AKO 

165 H13LRB 

166 ZL1SZ 
t67 ZS6XS 
I8fi ZS6XK 
189 PAfflTP 

170 JFlCPH 

171 JR7ICN 

172 pyaiEM 

173 JJ1KTI 

174 JA5PWW 

175 OZSEDft 

176 W38HM 
in JH30H0 

178 HI3AMF 

179 JA3UCO 
1BQ KAAMMO 
lai JFISEK 

182 JA5MG 

183 KC8AU 



AFRICAN AWARD 
160 NSCSW 168 VU7GLU 



176 IIEEW 

177 W3BHM 

178 AL70 

179 Py2CAR 
ISO PYlDWfv! 
161 N4CXK 

182 TU2HJ 

183 KATRC 

184 JH70FH 

185 PYSFK 

188 Ht3LRB 
187 2L1SZ 

189 W8UMP 
189 ZS6XS 

190 zsexK 

191 PY2IEM 



192 WA1UDH 

193 KA2JJI^ 

194 JR3LVi 

195 JF1CPH 

196 KA*MMD 

197 PA9TP 

198 JJ1KT1 

199 PYlBVY 

200 HI3AMF 

201 PY2RAN 

202 JH3OH0 

203 JFtSEK 
%)4 JASIMG 
205 KC8AU 
20€ lSi5AUB 
207 4X400 



161 KH6KU 

162 KSRNR 

163 WN5MBS 

164 DAIAS 

165 VK3MBA 

166 WBTUCg 

167 424VG 



169 JA5PWW 

170 VK2PY 

171 HZ-tS2eO 

172 4W. 16260 

173 VK3DXy 

174 nWXY 

175 KflLST 



EUROPEAN 

251 WDSMAI 

252 W7GLU 

253 0E3SWL'DWZ 

254 OE1-111080 

255 DF5VO 

256 WB7UCU 

257 VK3BMA 

258 WI^58MS 

259 VEIYX 

260 K9RNR 
2S1 KH6KU 

262 N5CSW 

263 KH6F 

264 11WXY 

265 VK3DXy 

266 KA7CPZ 

267 HZ'16260 

268 4W16260 

269 VK2PY 

270 0E2ABM 

271 KtLST 

272 VE70RJ 
04 MHz) 

273 VE7DR1 
(21 MHl} 

274 IIEEW 

275 W3BHm 

276 Py2CAR 

277 KA2IAL 

278 KAIRC 

279 KAC&MMO 

280 vyaavTD 

281 N4CXK 

OCEANIA 

145 N5CSW 

146 KH6Ky 

147 WN5MBS 
14a JA9AXS/1 

149 VKSMBA 

150 WB7UCU 

151 KA3FUU 

152 W7GLU 

153 K3WUR 

154 VK2PY 

155 VK30XY 

156 KB2WH 
167 nwXY 

158 N7CZH 

159 N4CKK 
T60 WiStX 
181 K3WUR 
162 KAIRC 



AWARD 

282 N7CZH 
2B3 N5AUB 

284 TU2HJ 

285 Hi3AMF 
266 PY2FK 
2B7 KA5BQM 
268 K2yOF 
S89 JAfiAXS^I 

290 PY2SZK 

291 K9UP 

292 H13LRB 

293 WDOAOC 
2^ ZS1SZ 

295 ZL2LQ 

296 KA9CEJ 

297 ZS6XS 

298 ZS6XK 

299 PAdTP 

300 PY21EM 

301 WA2FYW 

302 JR7ICN 

303 JFlCPH 

304 WP4ATF 

305 JJIKTt 

306 V^CNV 

307 JA&PWW 

308 JH30H0 

309 jygcw 

310 JFISEK 

311 JASMG 

312 NfiGBM 

313 KC8AU 



AWARD 

163 PY2CAR 

164 IIEEW 

165 KflLST 

166 JGIQIT 

167 PV2FK 

168 02'DR-1239 

169 N4AK0 

170 HI3LRB 

171 2L1S2 

172 ZS6XS 

173 ZS6XK 

174 JF1CPH 

175 JH3LVI 

176 JR7ICN 

177 PA9TP 

178 JA5PWW 

179 JJ1KTI 

180 W3&HM 



122 73 Magazine • Novembef. 1982 



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Power: 3 Ranges (Forward, 20/200/2000 Watts) 

(Reflected, 4/40/400 Watts) 
Dimensions: 180 x 120 x 130 mm; 7 x 4.75 x 5 in. 

Write for complete specifications. 

J.W. Miller Division 
BELL INDUSTRIES 

19070 Reyes Ave. ■ P.O. Box 5825 
Compton, California 90224 

30B (213) 537^5200 ■ TWX 910^346-6740 





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THE PRODUCT THAT SPEAKS FOR ITSELF!! 



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* Suitable for beginners and proficient 
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^ A ^'musf ' for novice classes 



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if Variable group length and single 
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MMS 1 $225 Shipping $5.50 



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t^Sefi" List of Advertisers on page 730 



73Magazine • November, 1982 123 



OCEANIA (ConU 






DX CARTALS OF THE WORLD AWARD 


73 KA1DJB 


-■92 KB8WJ 








18 N6ATS 


24 VK2PY 


74 KA3GSN 


93 KAOJ 1 1 


181 VE6CNV 


186 


JA5MQ 


19 VK2HD 


25 WB3BVL 


75 WB9HPR 


94 KA5K0S 


182 JhaOHO 


187 


KC8AU 


20 2S6ABA 


26 WB2TOJ 


76 W4PCK 


95 VK2VVA 


1&3 JA3UC0 


188 


f^SAUB 


21 SVIGJ 


27 PY2FK 


77 KA4LSJ 


96 KA4WBR 


164 KMMMD 


189 


N6GBM 


22 VE1ACK 


28 VE6CNV 


{23 MHlJ 


97 KAeMVV 


185 JF1SEK 






23 4Z4VG 




78 KA4LSJ 

(21 MH4 


98 KA1HJK 

99 KA9JJK 


73 DX CDUMTRY CLUB AWARD ^SSB) 






79 KA3FUU 


TOO KA2IAL 


75 WD6DFN 


95 


NmS 


lOMhTER DX DECADE AWAfiD 


&0 IM1BDB 


101 WL7AHD 


76 8P60V 


97 


VK3BMA 


1 WB4VyfiEyM 


7 WD5JRG 


&1 KP4FCK 


102 Py2SZK 


77 KN4f 


98 WD4JEQ 


2 AG3Q 


& WA4ZLZ 


82 KA2MIM 


103 KAOMMD 


1979) 


99 


KC4yY 


3 W5TJQ 


9 WB8L3V 


83 W1DWA 


t04 KA1HFW 


78 KN4F 


100 


N5CSW 


4 WD0AVG 


10 WB9WFZ 


84 KA2JMJ 


105 KA9CEG 


(1980) 


101 


4W-16260 


5 DA2AL 


11 W8AKSV6 


85 KA7JNP 


106 KA9CEJ 


79 WA9IVU 


102 


VK2PY 


6 WB4T2A 


12 KA3FUU 


•86 WA2AKX 


107 KA9LYH 


eo- W7HAZ 


103 


H2CFH 






87 KP4ERH 


108 fMBCYS 


81 K9IML 


104 


W1SIX 


SPECIALTY COMMUNtCATIONS AWARD 


88 KA8CUS 


109 WBQUIA 


82 AG7P 


105 


N4CXK 


CLASS A: WORKED ALL STATES 


89 KA4VNS 


110 NS4J 


83 KA1UA 


106 


ZS6XS 


1 WA6VGS 




90 N8CJF 


111 VE6CIMV 


84 N6ATS 


107 


VE3JPJ 


2 KE7G 




91 WDOEPV 


112 .KA2LH0 


85 KE7C 


100 


I20DZ 










86 KA3FUU 


109 


I5H0R 


SPECIALTY COMMUNICATIONS AWARD 


CENTURY CITIES AWARD 


97 VK2HD 


110 


KA1RR 


CLASS All 


DX COUNTRIES 


23 KC9CA 


31 SP60V 


(1979) 


tn 


WB3HTK 






24 N8CJF 


32 KAOMMD 


88 VK2HD 


112 


KI2G 


9 K3WUR 


16 N5CSW 


25 KE7G 


^^ ^^ r -k ■ 1 ^U R ■ ■ n ■ 1 ^m^F 

33 WA6NIE 


(1980) 


113 


DEiJDXM 


{RTTY) 


(RIIY) 


26 AKOG 


34 VE3JPJ 


89 VK2HD 




(1979) 


10 VUB2VTD 


17 HB9MaM 


27 WB7VBQ 


35 KA90JX 


(1981) 


114 


DEi^DXM 


(R 1 1 Y) 


{OSCAR 7^8) 


28 KA8MVV 


36 KA1HJK 


90 9Q1HT 




{1980) 


11 PY3GJ5 
(RTTY) 


18 0E4H0 


29 KA3FUU 


37 NP4D2 


91 SVIGJ 


115 


OeODXM 


IRTTY) 


30 OE8MOK 


■38 VE6CNV 


92 WA8KMK 




(1981) 


12 KE7C 


19 VE2QO 






93 VK2J^HV 


116 


KA6D 


(Rl lY) 


(Rl lY} 


DISTRICT ENDURANCE AWARD 


94 CT2CQ 

95 HC2RG 


117 


0J9ZB 


13 AL70 

{Rl lY) 


20 VE2Q0 

(OSCAR 7/8) 


i XElTfS 


12 SVIGJ 


\^ x^ 1 ^ ^i^ ^^ " " ^^^^ 






14 PYIEWN 


21 Of44ClVl 


(49 min.) 


{42 min. J 








(RTTY) 


(RTTY) 


9 mwm 


13 0K2QX 


73 DX COUNTRY CLUB (CW) AWARD 


15 OE1P8A 




m min.) 


(56 min,) 


13 VE1ACK 


IS ^ 


1X4 FU 


(Rl lY) 




10 KE7C 


14 KAGMMD 


14 KC3W 


19 1 


^Y2FK 






(14 min.) 


[39 min. J 


15 K0LST 


20 ( 


^Y2BTR 


5 AWARD OF EXCELLENCE 


11 KA3FUU 




16 OFPABM 


21 E 


3F5UT 


ei N7CPE 


67 KA5KK2 


(50rniri.) 




17 K6FO 






jii ■n.enDn.i 


£^Ct i^ A ^rr M;*. J 




t 



WORKED ALL USA AWARD 
(40 METERS) 

4 WDOBOS 6 N4QH 

5 N5AHZ 7 KA1DMB 



WORKED ALL USA AWARD 
{20 METERS) 

11 KA9J0L 14 WAQJCEL 

12 KE7C- 15 KA400U 

13 KC4YY 16 KA9LVH 

WORKED ALL USA AWARD 
(15 METERS) 

5 KA4IFF 7 Nf4QH 

6 WB9UKS S WB7VQB 



WORKED ALL USA AWARD 
(10 METERS) 

5 VK7NBT -7 N4QH 

6 VE1BWP B N5C5W 

WORKED ALL USA AWARD 
{6 METERS) 

a N5DDB 113 K4G0K 

9 N9CEX T1 W4CKD 



73 DX COUNTRY CLUB (MIXED} AWARD 

22 WB5LBR 24 NL7J 

23 WD6EEQ 25 KAQUVIMD 



63 KA7EII 69 PY2UGS 

64 W8UPD 70 KA3FUR 

65 KA2JDJ 71 KA6JQB 

66 WB9KUV 72 KA7GPZ 



WORKED ALL USA AWARD 
{80 METERS) 

7 WA0RVK 9 W4PCK 

8 ISI4QH 10 WB2ZEL 



WORKED ALL 
{MIXED 

54 N7CPE 

55 KA3GSN 

56 KA3FUU 

57 KA4VNS 
56 AG7P 

59 NBCJF 

60 KA5EEZ 

61 KA7JNP 
€2 WA91VU 

63 8P60V 

64 KA7CP2 

65 AKIBG 

66 VE3JPJ 

67 HC2RQ 



USA AWARD 
BAND) 

68 KACSJTT 

69 KA2MHVI 

70 KA8MVV 

71 N3CHN 

72 N3AKQ 

73 KA1HJK 

74 KAOMMD 

75 WB9U1A 
(1980) 

75 W89U1A 
{19B1) 

77 W89UIA 
{1982} 

78 VE6CNV 



mElUTBZ 



Amateur satellite Reference Orbits 



Date 



OSCAfi B 
UTC EQX 



as-5 

UTC EQX 



RS- 

OTC 



EQX 



RS-7 

UTC EQX 



UTC EQX 



Date 



= Ti— n 



Net Name 


Day 


Time 




Freq* {MHz) 


East Coast 


Wed 


2 loo 


East 


ern 3*650 


Mid-^tiecica 


wed 


2100 


Cent 


cal 


3.eso 


West Coast 


wed 


2O00 


Pacific 


3*e50 


Hew York City 


Wed 


2200 


East 


ern 


144,400 


Goddard Center 


Wed 


2100 


Eastern 


146,835 


Los Angeles 


wed 


2OO0 


Paci 


fie 


145,805 


UK 


Sun 


lOOO 


UTC 




3.730 


International 


SJn 


leoo 


UTC 




21.260 


International 


Sun 


1900 


UTC 




14*282 


European 


Sat 


1000 


UTC 




14,280 


Bspiinol 


sun 


1900 


UTC 




14.180 


Asia/ Pacific 


Sun 


1100 


UTC 




14,305 


South Pacific 


Sat 


2 200 


UTC 




28,978 


EoMth Africa 


Sun 


0900 


UTC 




14*280 


SEASAT 


Sun 


1300 


UTC 




7*280 


Australian. 


Sun 


1000 


UTC 




3.630 


New Zealand 


Hed 


080O 


UTC 




3.S50 



Table 1, AMSAT nets provide uptO'the-minute news about ama- 
teur satellite developments, 

AMSAT NETS 

Keeping up with the latest devetopments in the amateur space 
program is as easy as tuning your ham rig to one of th^ AMSAT 
nets. During these sessfons, youMI hear information ranging from 
the latest Phase I II news to tips on when and where to work the rare 
satellite DX. Technical discussions abound, and you can usually 
pick up the latest tracking data. Table 1 is a list of these informa- 
tive gatherings. 

PHASE IIIB PROGRESS 

Summer was a time of further testing and refinement for the 
Phase IHB satellite, now tentatively scheduled for January, 1983, 

124 73 Magazine • November, 1982 



Hqv 



Dec 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 

ii 

12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
IB 
Id 

2a 

21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 



0E»13 
0017 
0022 

0026 
0030 
0035 
0039 
0043 
004S 
0052 
0057 
0iai 
0195 
0110 
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0119 
0123 
012? 
0132 
0136 
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0002 
0306 
a0ll 
0015 
0019 

0028 

0033 
0037 



0041 
004£ 
0053 
0B55 
0059 
0103 
01S8 
0112 
S117 

01:^1 

0125 
0130 
0134 
0139 
0000 



79 
80 

81 
82 
34 
85 
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87 
88 
89 
91 
92 
93 
94 
95 
96 
98 
99 
100 

lai 

102 
73 
79 

SI 

82 
B3 
B4 
86 

87 



88 

99 

90 

91 

92 

94 

35 

96 

97 

90 

100 

101 

102 

103 

78 



0008 
0002 
0157 
0151 
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0130 
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0119 



0109 
0103 
0058 
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0037 
0031 
0026 
0020 
0015 
0010 
0004 
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0127 
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0055 
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0044 
0038 
0033 
00 28 
0022 
0017 
0012 



296 
296 
32€ 
327 

327 

327 

327 

327 

327 

328 

323 

328 

323 

323 

329 

329 

32& 

329 

329 

329 

330 

330 

330 

330 



1 

1 

1 

1 

1 



2 
1 
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1 
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3 
3 
3 
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4 
4 
4 
4 



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0024 
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0035 
00 20 
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0000 
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41 
00 26 



0011 
0154 
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0037 
0022 
0006 
0149 
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0032 



326 

324 
322 
319 
317 
315 
312 
310 
337 
335 
333 
330 
323 
326 
323 
321 
349 
346 
344 
342 
339 
337 
335 
332 
360 
357 
355 
353 
350 
343 



346 

13 

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357 

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0033 
0029 
0020 



0010 
0000 
0150 
0140 
0130 
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0052 
0042 
033 
0023 
0013 
0004 
0153 



311 

310 
309 
308 
307 
306 
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334 
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33 2 
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35 4 
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344 
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0059 
057 
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0045 
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0037 
0034 
0031 
028 
0026 
023 
020 

0017 

0014 

0011 



0009 
0006 
0003 

0000 
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012$ 



317 

319 
319 
320 
320 
321 
322 
323 
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324 
325 
326 
327 
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329 
329 
33 
331 
332 
333 
333 
334 
335 
336 
337 
338 
338 
339 
340 
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342 
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343 
344 
15 
16 
17 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
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1 
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5 
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7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 



1 
2 
3 
4 

6 
7 

8 
9- 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 



launch. According to the AMSAT Satelflt& Report, malfunctfons 
which occurred in both communications transponders during a 
midsummer thermal/vacuum test were quickly corrected by the 
AMSAT DL crew in Germany. 

If all goes as planned, Phase IMS will i\y aboard the seventh 
launch {L7) of the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane missile. 
The January launch dale depends to a large extent on the success- 



ful launches ot L5 and L6. The former was scheduled for earfy Sep* 
tember and the latter for late November. 

ESA's Ariane is now a head-on competitor with the Space Shut- 
tle as a commercial satellite launcher. By means of low prices, ad- 
vertisements in satellite industry magazines, and other marketing 
tools, ESA has built a backfogof more than 20 spacecraft awaiting 
a boost into orbil. 



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3 level security BIT inversion for BAUDOT 
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Factory programmed - for amateur or RTTY 
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(713) 464-7720 Dick-WB5JWL 

Gordy-KD5NQ 



WL ELECTRONICS 
91 38 Western Drive 
Houston, TX 77080 



73 Magazine • NovembeM982 125 




t 



"AEA once again breaks new 
ground in the code com- 
fnunications field with the 
new model MBA^RC reader/- 
code converter The MBA-RC 
decodes Morse, Baudot or 
ASCII signals off the air and 
I displays them on a large 32 
character alphanumeric 
I vacuum fluorscent display. In 
I addition, it will output Morse 
code for keying your transmit- 
ter. It will also generate RTTY 
(Baudot or ASCII AFSK two 
tone output- (170 or 850 Hz 

[shifts,) Any of the acceptable 
input codes can be converted 
to any of the specified output 
codes (any speed to any 
speed). If you have any of the 
common Baudot RTTY ter- 
minals as an example, you 
can now send and receive 
Morse and ASCII with your 
keyboard and printer. You can 
even generate ASCII or 
BAUDOT RTTY using your 
Morse hand key or memory 
keyer. 

Get the details. Write for our 
free product catalogue or bet- 
ter yet, see your favorite 
dealer. 

Prices and Specifications subject to 

change without notice or obligation. 

Software i^-) copyright by AEA. 



ADVANCED ELECTRONIC 

APPLICATIONS, INC. 

P,0, Box C-2160, 

Lynn wood, WA 98036 

(206) 775-7373 

Telex: 152571 AEA INTL 

^m ■■ ^ Brings you the 



126 73 Magazine • NovembeM982 



1 
1 



1983 
CALLBOOKS 




Order todayt 

NEW 1983 

RADIO AMATEUR CALLBOOKS 

READY DECEMBER 1ST! 

The latest editions of the worlcl*famou$ 
RadiQ Amateur Callbook will be available 
soon. The U,S, edUlon features over 
400,000 listings, witii over 75,000 changes 
from last year. The Foreign edition has over 
370,000 listings* over 50*000 changes. Each 
bool< lists calls and the address information 
you need to send QSL's. SpEJcial features 
Include call changes, census of amateur 
licenses. world*wide Q5L bureaus, prefixes 
of the world, internattonat postal rates, and 
much more. The new 19B3 Caiibooks wMI 
be published I^ecember 1, 1982. Order your 
copies now, 

Etch Shjppmn Jmh 



USCaliL 
Rvpgn 



^19.95 ^.05 $23.00 



SI a. 95 $3.05 522.00 

Order both books at ti^e same tfme for 

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Order from your dealer or directly from 
the publisher. AH direct orders add shipping 
charge. Foreign residents add $4.55 for 
shipping. Illinois residents add 5% sales tax. 

SPECIAL OFFER! 

Amateur Radio 

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only $230 postpaid 

Pegasus on blue field, red lettering* 3" wide 
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Announcing 



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*n 



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•MOVICE LICENSE STUOV GUIDE— liy rimoltiy M. fteniei NBfVe Here i^ ttie masi up to date novice 
gukte avaiLat>l€. It (scofnplete wrth i ntofmatton oitoul tearmng Morse Code, tias t^e latest fCC amateur 
r^u'iPitJon? and the current FCG appSicatk^rt fontig. Tiii^ guTde •£ f?Df a ({UQtstKHVanswer mefiKwizatiaft 
course but tatrter it emph^s^zes rhe practical side o» getting a tiam Ucense »nci putting a statlofi on the 
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• NOV*CE STUDY TAPES— 1 1 you are just Qfllting started m nam ra^io. you'M tind ihese tapes indispen 
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GENERAL LICENSE STUDY GUIDE 




GENERAL 
LKENSE 
STUDT 
GUIDE 

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GENERAL LICENSE STUDY GUIDE-By 

Timothy M. Daniel N8RK This is the 
complete guide to the General License. 
Learning rather than memorizing is the 
secret* This Is not a question-and- 
answer guide that will gather dust when 
the FCC issues a new lest. Instead, this 
book will be a helpful reference, useful 
long after a ham upgrades to General. 
Includes up-to-date FCC rules and an 
application form. Order yours today and 
talk to the world, SG7358 $6,95 

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S WPM— CT7X&— This IS Ihe hegtnr)ir>g tape for people 
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permaneni file o' hams wiio have masie'-ed it Let us 
know wtieo you're up to spee<d and we tl mscf'tw yoyr 
nanw in TJs CW Halt ot Fame 



• SACK ISSUES— Complete your collection, many a^e 
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*yse ihe order card in this magazine or itemize your order on a separate piece of paper and mail to: 73 Radio Bookshop • Peiert>orough NH 03458. Be sure to include check or 
detailed credit card inlormatlon. No C O-D. orders accepted. $1.50 for the llrst booh. St. 00 each additional book lor US. delivery and foreign surface. For foreign airmait $10.00 
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RADIO 



HAND BOOKS FOR 
THE HAMSHACK 



THE COMPLETE SHORTWAVE USTENER'S HAND- 
BOOK, 2t\(l ED!TtON t>y Hank Senriitt and Mwiy U 
Helms This compreho^nsive volume contains lOAds of 
rtew inlormatton from all over ihe M-ofld on ih« falest 
devsiopmerM^ ir^ SWL leci^noFogy ciuh^ assocfat^oas. 
praciicts and slalions- A tl^orougti guide to stations of 
the world by general continenla^ area and Irequancy is 
hncluded BK124t $9 95 

THE TEN METIR FM HANDBOOK -by Bod Koll K9EID. 

It) IS handbook ]ias been pybhshed \o hcilp the ten meter 
enttiustsst learn mote about the many methods Ol Cdft* 
versions and Iricks Ihal are used lo make existing unlti 
worK better Join Ihe great "tjrkerers" q\ Ihe world on ten 
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cadng wilti Amateur stations worldwide on ten mete^' 
FM SK1 190 14.95* 

THE PRACTICAL HANDBOOK OF AMATEUR flAOlO FM 
REPEATEflS-by BiW Pasternak WA6ITF (autnor or 73 
Magazines monlhly column "Looking We^l'l This is the 
book lot th& VHF/UHF FMer, compile-d trom materiel 
sul^mMted tjy over a hundred inclivtduals, ctubSj. 
Ofgar)i»tions and* equipment manutacturers A "must 
have" lor your ham shack she^L BKit8S 112 95.' 



^ 





THE 73 TEST 

EQUIPMENT LIBRARY 

VOL H AUDIO FREQUENCV TESTERS— Jam-cjacke<t 
wWti all Kinds Of ^udio Irequency lesl equipm&nt, if 
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too! LB7360 S1 95,* 



VOL ni RADIO f REOUENCY TESTERS— Radio frequen 
cy wa^res, the common d«nomjnator oJ amateur radio. 
Such items as SWW. antenna impedance, line imped- 
ance. RF output, and field sirenglh; dels pied mslnjctions 
on testing these items inciudes sections on signal gefv 
erators. crystal caNbraiora, grid dip oscillaiors, noise 
generators, dummy ioads, and much mare 
LB7361$T,95.* 



VOL IV IC TEST EQUIPMfiNT- Become a trotibie- 
shooting wizard! Here are 42 home construction pfoj- 
ects for building lest equipmeni lo work with your ham 
station and in servicing digital equipment. Plus a 
cumulative index lor all Toui volumes for ttie 73 TEST 
EQUIPMENT LIBRARY LBr362S1.95' 

ALL THREE OF THE ABOVE 
ONLY $4.95 ORDER LB7365 

RF AND DJGtTAL TEST EQUtPWEHT VOU CAN 

BUILD— B K 1044 — RftJurst.functmn, square wave 0#rv 
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marker, if and rf swMp str^erators. audio osc, a?M sig- 
nal in^ctor l4e MHz synthesizer, digital readouts lor 
counters, several counters, presctile'r. micfowave 
meter, etc 252 pages 6K1044 15 95 * 



SHOP 



FOR THE 
CONTESTER 



THE CONTEST COOKBOOK— This booh reveals \t\& 
secrets ol that elite group Of operators who tt>p the lisl 
when the contest results are pyblished II contains 
detailed suggestions tor the lirst time contest^r as well 
as tips for the advanced operator Domestic. DX, and 
specialty contests are all drscussed, comptete with 
photographs ard diagrams showing the equlpmeni and 
operating ald^ used by the top scorers. For the sertous 
cont ester BK7308 15 95. 





Tools 1^ 

Tecmmfqcies 



v_ 



WORLD 
PRESS SERVICES 



FOR ELECTRONICS 



THE 73 TECHNICAL LIBRARY 





TOOLS « TECHNIQUES FOR ELECTRONICS- by A A 
Wicks IS an easy to understand tHXak wfjllen fon the 
heg inning kii-t>utl(leT as well as the ekperienced hob- 
bvisi It has numerous pictures and descriptions ot the 
sate and correct way^ ^o use t^asic and spectaN^ed loots 
for etecironic projects, as weU as specialized metal 
working tools and the chemica:) aids which Are uMd m 
fwair shops eK734d S4.95.' 

BEHIND THE DIAL— This book eitplains. in detail, 
what s ^ng on on aU the trequencies, from shortwave 
up to microwave II giv^s I1i^ readef a ^Xid idea ol what 
he can firnl and wtiet-e to find it. irKluditiQ $orii« ot the 
secret stations such as the CI. A and the P B.t. 
Evefyihing is covered sNJtf of microwave monitoring. 
Anyfon^ interested ^r> putchasinq a sfioftwave leceivet 
slHHihJ have a copy of Ihis book, suivetllance, statfon 
l*yout consKteration, antenna systems, mterrace^ and 
the electromagnetic spectrum, are tncluded. 
BK7307 S4.95 

THE NEW WEATHER SATELLITE HANOeOOK-by Df 
Ralph E. Taggart WS8DQT Here is the completely up- 
dated artd revis^ed edition contammg all the intorma- 
tion on the most sophisticated and effective apace- 
crad now in orbd This book serves both the experi- 
enced amateur satellite enthusiast and the newcomer. 
It IS an introduction to satellile watching, providing all 
the information required lo construct a complete and 
highly etlectlve ground station Soird tiiardware 
desifir^S and all the instructions necessary to operate 
Ihe equlpmeni are included. Fof expeMmenlers who 
are operating stations, the book details all procedures 
necessary lo modify equipment for the new series of 
spacecraft, Amateur weather sateillie activity repre- 
sents a unique blend ol irtierests encompassing elec* 
tronics, meieoroiogy and asironautlcs Join the privi- 
leged few in watching the spectacle of earth as seen 
from space on your own monitoring equipment. 
BH7a83 ta 95 ' 




NEW 



THECHALLENaE OF laO— The growth of amatetJT radk) 
today is encouraging Hie use of teOmeiets. All the mior 
mat ion rvecessary to get Siavied on Ihis unique tiand, tf^ 
all important antenna ar>d ground systems are described 
in detaii. Also, fiow lo get on, toi^^baral ofiemltng Itps, 
top^^and transjnittefs. propagatiofi. 'wealtier leceivtfig 
fiQuipmeni, and mote are covered in fuM. Tt»e intitiMkiC^ 
tion contains mieresting photos of Stew PiB«¥'s (tt« 
King ol I60v shack. This reference is useful lo new and 
ejtpetiencect tO{3-band opetators. BK730d ^.36 

INTER FEREMCE HANDBQOK~by W^ittam R. Nelson. 
WAGEGG — This limely handbook covers every type of 
RFI prohlem and gives you the solutions based on 
practical experjence Covers interference lo TV. radio, 
h»-ti. telephone, radio amateur, commefctal and CB 
equtpmeni Power ime Interference is covered in depth 
—how to locate it, cure it, work with the public, salety 
precautions, how to train RF/I investigators. Written by 
an RFI eKpert with 33 years of ettpenence, thjs prof use^ 
ly illustrated book is packed with pfacticai easy4o- 
understand informallon eKl230S6 95.* 

OWNER REPAIR OF RADIO EOUIPMEWT— by Frank 
Glass K6R0. Here's a book that will Teach you an ap- 
proach to troubleshooting without a ^hack full ot lest 
equipment. Written in a narrative, non mathematical 
style. It will encourage you to successtully tin your own 
rifl probiems BO to 90% ol the time. Even if you don't 
want to flM, you can learn a lot about how things work 
and tail. Add to you' liExary and personal expertise. 
BK7310I7 96,* 



EVERYTHING YOU ALWAYS WAITED TO KNOW 
ABOUT AMATEUR TELEVISION, Ibui were afraid to ask) 
"By Mike Stone WBOQCD- This book is a complete 
guide to setting up your own amateur radio television 
station. It contains— A history, what equlpmeni you 
need, video theory, cameras, r#co refers, iiohtirig, specjai 
effects^ sound ATV DXing. mobile FSTV. ATV rep&alers^ 
ATV groups, building projects, test equipment, dealer dl- 
rectory, a cumulative index of over 1(M0 articles on ama- 
teur TV and much more. This is the rjew, 19S3 edition. 
From the publishers of Amatetur Television Msg^ime. 
$9.95 BK 1244 

WORLD PRESS SERVICE FREOUENClES-by 
Tl'iomas Harrington Canl wait to liea^ the evening 
news, or are you wondering about the news thai you 
a^enV hearirig'' Receive by Radio Tetetype (RTTYJ aft 
the world news and financial happen irrgs from the 
world capitols on a 24 hour a day basis This boo^ gives 
you Ihe frequencies and times of broadcast of such 
news services as A P. UPt, Reuters. TASS. VOA and 
London Press. Also inclurfed is an miroducikon to 
RTTY With information on equipment, antennas^ abbre - 
viaftons— evervthmg you need to get siarlid in RTTY 
6K1202 17.95' 



THE MISUNDERSTOOD MODE^by Jam«s 3 
Wi'ison Smgie Sideband Transmission 1tfousaJi>i|s of 
us use it evefy day. yet it remams one of ihe least 
understood facels ot amateur radto, J B Mil»on 
presents several methods of sK>el>and generatron, arw 
ply illusirated with charts and schen^tics, which w»ll 
e>nable the amt^itious reader lo construct nis own side- 
band generator A must (or the technically serious ham 
BK735T 1-5 50 * 

PROPAGATIOI4 WIZARD^S HANDBOOK-- by J H 
Nelson When sunspots riddled the worldwide com 
municahons networks of the 1940s, ^ohn Henry Nelson 
looked to the planets for an answer. The result was a 
theory ot propagation forecasting based upon inter 
planetary alignment that made the author tnc most re- 
liable toiecaster in America today The book provides an 
enlightened look at communications past, present, and 
future, as well as teaching I ha art of propagation 
forecasting BK7302Se 95.- 

IC OP-AMP COOKBOOK— by Walter G Jung. Covers 
nol only Ihe basic theory ol the iC op amp in great 
detail, but also includes over 250 prachcal circuit ap- 
plications, liberally itiustrated 592 pages. SV* xflv*. 
SOftbound BK102d S14.95,- 



* Use the order card in thjs magazine or ilemiz© your order on a separate piece of paper and mail to: 73 Radio Bookshop • Peterborough NH 03456 Be sure to include check or 
detailed credit card informaiion No GOD orders accepted. $1.60 tor the first book, il.OO each aclditional book lor U,S, delivery arid foreign surface For loreign airmail $10.00 
pet book. Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery Quest ions rega/ding your order? Please write to Customer Service at the above addre$$. fF'rices subject to change on books not 
published by 73 Magazine.} 



FOR TOLL FREE ORDERING CALL 1-800-258-5473 



y 



r 



RADIO 

ANTENNA BOOKS 




CUBICAi. 

QUAD 






wmmmmmmm^^^'Ki'imm 



r 



litummmmKmmmmimmmm 











Oipole arte 
Long-Wire 
Antennas: 



VHF ANTENNA HANDBOOK— The new VHf Am^noa 

Handbook details I he theory, destgn, and construction 
of hundreds of different VHF and UHF antennas. . ,a 
practrca^ book wriuen for the average amateur who 
takes jay in buifding, not full of complej^ formulas for the 
design engineer. Packed with fabulous antenna projects 
you can build, aK7368 $5.95/ 

• BEAM ANTENNA HAISDBOOK ^New 5th edil(on)- 

3K1 197 — Yagi beam theory, constructfon ar>d operaiion 
Infornnaliort ori w^re beanrs. SWR curves and rnatching 
systems. A ■■must" for serious DXers. $5.95" 

• VHF HANDBOOK FOR RADIO AWATEURS— BKt 198 

— Contams mfofmation on FM [fteory, operation and 
equipment. VHF antenna design andconsUuciiori, satel- 
lite EME, and the newest sol<d-staie circuiJs $6.95"' 

• THE RADfO AMATEUR ANTENNA HAND0OOK- 

BK1199— All atjoul vvire anienndS. beams, tuners, 
baluns. coa)^. radials, SWR and towers Clear and com- 
ptete informatton. $6.95' 

• SIMPLE, LOW-COST WIRE ANTENNAS FOR RADIO 
AMATEURS- BK 1200— All new data and every Ihirtg you 
want to know about low-cost, multi-band antennas, inejc- 
pen&ive bearns, ■■invisiible antennas lor hams in 
"■tough" locations. $6.95* 





W': 



75 DIPOLE AND LONG WIRE ANTENNAS-by Edward 
M. Moll W3FQJ. This is Ihe first collection of virtually 
every type ol wire antenna used by amateurs. Includes 
dimensions, configurations, and detaiJ^d construction 
data for 73 deferent antenna types. Appendices 
desc-ribe the construction of noise bridges, line tuners, 
afiid data on measuring resonani [requency, velocity 
factor^ and swr. BK1016 36 50* 

• ALL ABOUT CUBICAL QUAD ANTENNAS (2nd edi^ 
tion^— BK11§6— The Classic " on Quad desian. 
theory, construction, and operation. New 2nd ediliofi 
contains new feed and matchfrig systems and new 
data. S5JS/ 



y 



k. 



• HOW TO DEFEND VOURSELF AGAINST RADAR— BK1 207 — by Bruce F Bogner and James R Bodnar, a lawyer 

and radar expert. This book gives you the ammunition to challenge the radar '^evidenqe" that usually leads to a 
speeding conviction. The major part ot ttie book details the inner workings of radar —you'll become more of an ex- 
pert than rriosl police officers and judges. The remainder of the book outlines how to defend yourseJf againsi a 
speedmg ticket— the observations, measures and testimony you must obtain to defend yourself wilhoul the help of 
a lawyer. The price is a fcot less than a fine! $6.95* 



MICROCOMPUTER BOOKS 



ANNOTATED BASIC-A NEW TECHNIQUE FOR NEO^ 
PHYTES. VOL 1 & 2— Annotated BASIC explains the 
complejti[ies of modern BASIC, 1 1 includes complete 
TRS-80* Level II BASIC programs that you can use. Each 
program is annotated to explain in step- by- step fashion 
the workings of the program. Programs are flowcharted 
to assisted you in foFlowing fhe operational sequence. 
And— each chapter includes a description of the new 
concepts which have been introduced. 
Volume 1 BK73&4 £10.95 Votume 2 BK73S5 SlO.95 

HOBBY COMPUTERS ARE HEREIff you want to come 
up to speed on how computers work— hardware and 

software— this is an excellent book, ft starts with fun- 
damentals and explains the circuits and the basics of 
programming, along with a couple of TVT construction 
projects, A3CIL Baudot, etc. This book has the highest 
recommendations as a teaching aid- S2.47. BK7322 

KILOBAUO KLASSROOWI — By George Young and Peter 
Stark, Learning electronics theory without practice isn't 
ea^y. And it "s rio fun to build an efectronlcs project that 
you can't use. Kiiobaud Klassfoom the f^opular series 
ffrsl published in Kilobaud Microcompuifng, combines 
theory with practice. This is 3.pr3ciicai course in digital 
electronics. It starts out wirti very simple electronics 
projects, and by the end of the course you'll construct 
your own working microcomputeri SK7386 $14.95 

• 40 COMPUTER GAMES-BK73ai — Forty games tn ail 
in nine different categories. Games for large and small 
systems, and even a section on calculator games. Many 
versiorts of BASIC used and a wide variety of systems 
represented. A must for the serious computer games- 
man. $7 95' 

• UNDERSTANDING AND PROGRAMMING MICRO- 
COMPUTERS— BK7382— A valuable addition to your 
compuling library. This two-part text includes the tiest 
articles that have appeared in ?3 and Kilobaud 
Microcomputing magazines on the hardware and soft- 
ware aspects of microcomputmg. Well-known authors 
and well -structured text helps the reader get Involved. 
$10,95* 



TEXTEDIT— A Complete Word Proc^sstng System In 
kll !orm— by Irwin Rappaport, TEXTEDIT \s an inexpen- 
sive word processor that you can adapt to suit your 
needs, from writing form letters to targe texts. It is writ- 
ten in modules, so you can load and use only those por- 
tions that you need. Included are moduiesthat perform 
right jusMficalicn, ASCII upper/lowercase conversion, 
bne-key phrase entering, complete editorial functions, 
and much more! TEXTEDiT is written in TRS-80* Disk 
BASIC, and the modules are documented in the 
author's admirably clear tutorial writing style. Not only 
does Irwin Rappaport e>(plain how to use TEXTEDiT; he 
also explains programming techniques implemented 
in the system, TEXTEDIT is an ine.>ipensive word pro- 
cessor that helps you learn about BASIC program- 
ming. It is written for TRS^SO Models I and III with TRS- 
DOS 2,2/2.3 and 32K. ^TRS-80 and TRSDOS are trade- 
marks of the Radio Shack Division of Tandy Corpora^ 
tion, BK7387 $9.97 



• SOME OF THE BEST FROM KILOBAUD/MICROCOM 
PUTING— BK731 1 — A collection of the best articles (hat 
have fecent^y appeared in Kilobaud/ MICROCOMPUT- 
ING, Incruded is material on the TRS^ and PET 
systems. CP/IVI. ihe aoao^SO@5/2BO chips, the A SR-33. ter- 
minal. Data base management, word processing, text 
editors and file si ructures are covered loo Program ming 
techniques and hardcore hardware construction pfoj- 
ects for modems, high speed cassette interfaces and 
TVTs are aJso mcluded in this large format. 200 plus 
page edition. £10.95 * 



THE NEW H08BY COMPUTERS- This book takes up 

from where "HOBBY COfvlPUTERS ARE HERE!" leaves 
off, with chapters on Large-Scale Integration, how 
to choose a microprocessor chip, ^rt Introduction 
to program ming^ low-cost I/O for a computer., com- 
puter arithmetic, checking memory boards... and 
much, much morel Oon't miss this tremendous value! 



COOK BOOKS 



TTL COOKBOOK— by Don Lancasfer. Explains what 
"TTL is. how it works, and how to use it. l!)iscusses prac- 
tical applications, such as a digital counter and dis- 
play system, events counter, electronic stopwatch, 
digital voltmeter and a diaital tachometer. 
BK 1063 $9.50.* 

CMOS COOKBOOK — by Don Lancaster Details the 
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20 63 

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479 Encon , , 136 

400 Engineering Conauiting Service 

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85 Faxscan, inc , , 119 

323 FoX'TanaoCofp, . 67,111 

477 FoX'TangoCojp ,*. , 138 

1 51 Francis Enterprises, Inc. . 99 

149 G&ROesign. Inc, . , 101 

178 GaiaJty Eiectronics . 69 

143 GLBEleclronics 143 

417 GotNani Ani^^na 92 

132 Gra no Systems 142 

352 Grove Enterpnses, Inc 62 

86 H5 RGQmiTKjxiic^tJons 67 
31 HalTiontK .132 
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354 Jen&enT&olsJnc 144 

72 JDL industries ,38 



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93, 123 

• JWL Electronics 125 

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322 Lsrsen Antennas, ... 37 

452 Lewis construction Co 68 

484 Lunar El-ectrofifcs . . . 134 

77 M'SQuaredErrgineeffng, Inc 145 

44 Macrotronrcsjnc. . ^53 

45 Madison Electronics . 137 
134 Martin Engineering ,,,... ,90 

47 MFJ Enterprises , . . 51 117, 119. 121 
483 MFJ Enterprises , , . 13S 

48 MHz Electronics. 148157 

49 M jcrQ Gont rot Spec laities , 55 

50 MicrocraftCorp .121 

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480 Morlty .... 136 

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318 National Com m Group Co. 44 

412 Nemal Eiectfomcs 41 

Q/lMJf Magazine 101 

P. C. Electronics 72 

Palomar Engineers 4 

488 Pegasus Eiectrofiics .136 

182 Reterssn Electronics 69 

404 P. B- Badto Sen/ice 133 

300 PlpoGommunwcations 1*5 

ITS Pa>larflesean:ti.rnc 21 

Profiam Etecironics 20 

315 fladioActiviiy ... 74 

6t RadioAma^teufCa^/PocA. ir\c. i26 

397 Radio World . 123 

62 Ramsey Eiectronrcs 147 161 

185 Ramsey Etectromcs 3^ 

147 Randall Stierman 144 

156 RFEieo^fOfl^cs 24 

171 RicJge Systems Co.. inc . 121 

133 Ri^endelt Associates 90 

R.L Drake .... 5,39.79 

RQ Service Cenlef .... 144 



S-F Amateur Racfio Serf ices .137 
163 Sairrar Satellite TV Systems 67 
500 73 

Books 98,99.127 130. 141. 144 

Moving * ^ , . , -...., 96 

Subscnptions 08 131. 144 

University Microfilms . 1*4 

146 Stiaver Electronics . t42 

* Simple SJrBon Eiectfonjcs ¥,i\s .25 
112 SintecCo. . . 29 
367 Slep Electronics 146 
375 SMP , . 69 
102 Space Electronics. . 142 

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66 Spectrum Communications , .8fl<89 

436 Spectrum Inlernalionai. inc 123 

173 Spider Antenna . 133 

69 Su rp i us Elec tror ics 142 

1 83 Ta ycc Co m m u n i ca I i Ons . 1 42 

316 Telex Commiin I canons .13 

170 TETArtennaSyslema ., 85 

Ttie Antenna Bank .96 

118 The Blacksbuig Group 105 

449 THe Ham Snack ^ 

57 Hie "Tuned Antenna 61 

76 Trac Electronics 40 

104 Triooys Induslnes 62 

yniversaiCommunicaiions . 62 
155 Universal Chstribu tors 146 

* UniverSai Electronics 125 
179 Us^s Inremaiicna! Ractko Ciut> 

113 

VJ P*roducis. Iific. . T37 

422 Valor Entefprrses 135 

* }fBn Gorden Engineef tng 3t 
311 Vanguard Labs 145 

VJ4i4r^lnd. . 35 

478 VoCom Pnarfutts 138 

302 W-SEr>ginGering 75 143 

481 W-SEngineenng 134 

80 Westefn Rad^o ElectTonics . 41 

154 WestlgndEiecfionscs J 

83 YaesuEtectronicsCorp Gov ill 

476 Yaesu Electronics Corp 134 

336 Z Associates 142 



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130 73 Magazine • No vem tier, 1982 













10 

11 

12 





the 



NEVER SAY DJE — If you want controversy, 
Wayne Green W2NSD/1 will give it to you. His 
popular column ranges from travelogue to tirade 
and is guaranteed to entertain, inspire and 
enlighten you. 

DX — This, globe-trotting column keeps you in- 
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man Reef to Bahrain. 

CONTESTS — You get all the news on the contest 
world from Robert Baker WB2CFE He'll give you 
information on upcoming events and results from 
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FUN — lust for fun, lohn Edwards KI2U provides 
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test your ham mettle. 

FCC — If you're looking to the future, these out- 
takes from the Federal Register chronicle changes 
in policy and regulations that relate to amateur 
radio. 

RTTV LOOP— To keep you abreast of radiotele- 
type developments, Marc Leavey WA3A|R ex- 
plains the new RTTY equipment, the increasing 
role of computers in RTTY, and other matters of 
interest to digital communications fans. 

REVIEWS — Before you buy, save yourself some 
money check 7i's irndepth evaluation of the 
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HAM HELP — As a service to you, 73 prints your 
questions in our magazine. This helps you to ob- 
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SATELLITES— From Phase III to TVRO. 73 Ua^,^ 
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NEW PRODUCTS— This brief look at the latest 
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new developments in amateur radio. 

AWARDS — To find out what certificates are avail- 
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aW the ham radio awards, 

CONSTRUCTION -^The builder's magazine . 
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TSMagazme • November 1982 131 



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132 73 Magazine • November. 1982 



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7131 DWENSf4CUTH AVENUE, SUITE 4fi3C 
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PARTS & INFORMATION 




73 Magazine • November, 1982 133 



NEW PRODUCre 



GaAsFET VHF/UHF 

AMPUFIERS 

Lunar has announced a line of 
narrowband tuned receiving 
preamplifiers for the VHF and 
UHF communities. Typical 
specifications exceed those of 
previously-available receivmg 
preamplifiers by up to ten times 
In performance. Exhibiting very 
high gain at VHF (typically 
22-24 dB), moderate gain at 
UHF (typ, 16 dB), and a very low 
noise figure (typ. 0.3-0.4 dS on 
VHF and 0.5-0.6 dB on UHF 
land-mobile frequencies), these 
units are afso well-suited to 
high-rf environments, exhibiting 
1'dB compression power levels 
of + to dBm or more. 

The good gain, coupied with 
the very tow noise figure, effec- 
tively reduces a typical repeater 
receiver sensitivity to that of am- 
bient limitations. 6-10-dB im- 
provements in receiver perfor- 
mance have been consistently 
reported by users in atypical re- 
peater instaliation between the 
duplexer and receiver input. 

Units are built to the custom- 
er's specified frequency, but do 
exhibit a typical bandwidth of 
5% CF with little degradation in 
performance. Dc input is weii-fjl- 
tered and regufated, which al- 
lows accepting any dc voltage 
between 12 and 28 V {drain ap- 
prox. 35 mA). VHF connector op^ 
tions include BNC, SMA, N in 
and out; UHF connector options 
are SMA, N in and out. with SMA 
in BNC out the standard option. 
SMA to RG-58 connectors are in- 



cluded as options for UHF units. 
Frequencies are available from 
as low as 15 MHz to as high as 
theSOO MHzland-mobiie bands. 
For further information, con- 
tact Lunar Electronics, 2775 
Kurtz Street, Suite 11, San Diego 
CA 92110. Reader Service num- 
ber 484. 

NEW FROM 
W-S ENGINEERING 

W-S Engineering, manufac- 
turers of the Porta-Peater, have 
announced the introduction of 
new related products that will be 
of interest to both Porta-Peater 
owners and other amateurs 
alike. 

In addition tothe Porta-Peater 
M-100, which will interface with 
any two transceivers or receiver 
and transmitter pairs to create a 
full-function repeater, W-S Engi- 
neering now offers its new Por- 
ta-Link PL-250 and MB 1 Multi- 
Board building block. 

The Pofta-Link PL-260 is a sin- 
gle-board simplex link and por- 
table repeater that may be inter- 
faced with two transceivers, or 
two receiver-transmitter pairs, 
to form a complete repeater sys- 
tem for appiications that do not 
require a CW-ID system. Owners 
of the Porta-Peater can add the 
Porta-Link board and have a 
complete duplex link, remote 
base, and dual repeater. The 
PL-250 hason-board controls for 
timeout duration, hang time, au- 
dio balance, focal mike gain, 
and local speaker amplifier 
gain. Connections to the PL-250 




are done via a 22 pin, 0.156-inch 
edge connector. 

The MB-1 Multi-Board build- 
ing block is a '"universal" circuit 
that can provide up to ten differ- 
ent functions. Configured by the 
user, the MB-1 can be a variable 
audio-frequency signal genera- 
tor, variable radio-frequency sig- 
nal generator, audible CMOS 
logic probe, LED output logic 
probe, repeater beeper, gated 
monostable, gated astable, 
pulse stretcher, adjustable tim- 
er, individual positive and nega- 
tive edge triggers, and more. 

The MB-1 is completely self- 
contained and operates on any 
dc voltage between 5 and 15 
volts- Output level, pulse length, 
and frequency are fully adjust' 
able with on-board controls. The 
MB-1 comes complete with an 
assembly and applications 
manual, and all parts, sockets, 
PG board, and accessories are 
furnished. 

For further information about 
these products, contact W-S En- 
gineering, PO Box 58, Pine Hifl 
NJ 08021. Reader Service num- 
ber 481. 

YAESU FT-102 

Yaesu Electronics Corpora- 
tion has announced the avail- 
ability of its new FT-102 line of 
HF equipment. 

The FT-102 transceiver uti- 
lizes an all-new transmitter sec- 
tion featuring three 6146B final 
lubes for extremely low distor- 
tion. In addition to VOX and an rf 
clipping-type speech processor, 
the FT-102 transmit audio may 
be adjusted for optimum re- 
sponse to the operator's voice* 

The FT-102 receiver uses 
husky JFET components in the 
front end for wide dynamic 
range. A number of filter options 
are available, with wide/narrow 
filter selection independent of 



the mode switch. Audio peak fil- 
tering for CW, audio shaping for 
all modes, and an 1-f notch filter 
provide outstanding intelli- 
gence recovery. The noise 
blanker Is highly effective 
against the "woodpecker'' and 
pulse noises. 

Equipped for SSB and CW op- 
eration, the FT'102 option list In- 
cludes an AM/FM module for ac- 
tivating those modes. Other ac- 
cessories for the FT-102 are the 
FV-102DM synthesized vfo, the 
SP-102 speaker with audio filter, 
the SP-102P speaker/patch, and 
the FC-1 02 1.2-kW antenna tuner 
with optional remote antenna 
selector. 

For further information, con- 
tact Yaesu Electronics Corp., 
PO Box 49, Paramount CA 
90723. Reader Service number 
476. 

DENTRON^S NEW 5-BAND 
TRANSCEtVER 

DenTron Radio Company has 
begun production on a new 
200^WatL CW. SSB solid-state 
transceiver named the Horizon 
One, which covers 80-15 meters 
and any 500-kHz segment of 10 
meters. Its sensitivity is .35 uV 
for 10-dB signal-to-noise ratio, 
with selectivity of 2.4 kHz at 
6-dB points and G-60-dB factor 
of 1.7:1. Performing with the lat- 
est MOSFETand ballasted emit- 
ter semiconductors, the Horizon 
One also has a pinpoint digital 
frequency readout using LSI 
technology. 

Input power is 200 W PEP with 
an output of 100 W PEP nominal 
and 80 W PEP on 10 meters. 
Power requirements attB 
12.6-14.5 V dc regulated at 2.0 
Amps maximum and 12.6'-14.0 V 
dc regulated or unregulated at 
18 Amps peak. The Horizon One 
has a buflt-in VOX, noise blank- 
er, and hand mike as standard 




■y> ■•:■'-' -jK-r^ ' 



Lunar's GaAsFET VHF/UHF amplifier 
134 73 Magazine • November, 1982 



Yaesu' s FT 102. 



ALL YOUR GEAR AT YOUR 
FINGERTIPS m A CONVE- 
NIENT CONSOLE DESK 

Requires only 60'' corner space 
Formica desk top and shelves 
Shetf height adjustable 
Solid maple legs 
$495.00 check or M.O, 
Shipped freight collect 
Allow 30-45 days delivery 

Send for detailed brochure 



1S2 



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Suite 137-1700 

Woodridge. IL. 60517 




iCfjatf sna eqummem not includeiij 
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VISA or MASTEBCAflO tor 
sam6 day shipment 



For $69,95 you get the most efficient, 
dependable, fully guaranteed 35W 2 meter 
amp kit for your handy talkie money can buy. 

Now you can save your batteries by operating 
your HT. on low power and still get out like a 
mobile rig, The model 335A produces 35 watts 
out with an input of 3 watts, and 15 watts out with 
only 1 watt in. Compatible with 1C-2AT. TR-2400. 
Yaesu. Wilson & Tempo! Other 2 meter models are avail- 
able with outputs of 25W and 75W. in addition to a lOOW 
amplifier kit for 430MHZ. ^383 

Communication Concepts Inc. t?^^*'iSr*~ ^'^^"*'** 



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INSTALL QUICKLY 

A COMPLETE ANTENNA 
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ARX-2B 134- 164MHz 
ARX-220B 220-225MHZ 
ARX-4508 435-450MHZ 




Mobile HF 
Antennas 



The Pro^Am HF mobile series are heavy duty, sMin line 
construction, designed for the HF Amateor Bands, 75M. 
40M, 20W, 15M, and 10M. 

Heavy-gauge copper wire wound on ZiB^* fiberglass, 
with nickel-chrome brass fittings and 17-7 taper 
ground S.S. whips assure dependable mobile opera- 
tion. The 4* S.S. whip is field tunable for lowest 
VSWR and double locked with S.S. set screws. The 
The antenna features 3/8-24 ferrule to fit standard 
mobile mounts. Power-rated at 500 watts P.E.Pp 
for top mobile performance. Approx. .8' length. 



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Write or call today for complete details. 

Enterprises, Inc. 

Ids W. Hamilton St., West Milton, OH 45383 
PH: (513)698-4194, Outside Ohio: 1-800-543-2197 
Telejc 724-389 ATT: Valor 



conpOAArioN 

THE ANTENNA COMPANY 

48 Perimeter Rood. P.O. Box 4680 

AAonchester. NH 03108 

Telex "953050 ^^m 



^See List ot AdverU$Bf$ on page fSO 



73Magazine • November, 1982 135 





DenTfon's Horizon One, 



Alpha Delta's Master Control Console. 



equipment. Optional accesso- 
ries include an ac power supply, 
matchmg antenna tuner, linear 
amplifier, and mobile mount. 

For further information, con- 
tact Tim NetlL Technicaf Sales 
Representative, DenTron Radio 
Company, Inc., 1605 Commerce 
Drive. Stow OH 44224: (216)S8& 
4973. Reader Service number 
485. 



DIVERSITY RECEPTION 
FOR REPEATERS 

Pegasus Electronics has an- 
nounced a new diversity receiv- 
ing system for repeaters. Now 
you can turn any repeater into a 
"super repeater' by adding a 
VS'2 voting system and an rf 
link. The VS-2 compares the au- 
dio quality of any 2 receivers 
(they need not be matched) and 
connects the one that hears you 
best to the repeater for retrans- 
mission. Since the VS'2 is 
always Jisteomg to both recetv- 
ers, it can continuously update 
as you go from a peak on one to 
a null on the other. The result: 
You have a repeater which 
sounds like it has no "dead" 
spots and your users are always 
readable as long as they are sol- 
id Into any one of your receivers. 

The VS-2 was designed to 
work with anything. It has all its 
own level controls and ensures 
a constant outpu! to your re- 
peater. It was designed to be In- 
stalled by anyone who knows 
how to read a scope. The VS-2 is 
supplied on a smgle circuit 
t>oafd (5^4" X 5 V* ") and contains 
two squelch circuits (COS), ft is 
fully compatible with 12*volt log- 
ic, 5-volt logic, and inverted logic 
by cutting the desired jumpers 
(or yoti can use your own logic 



and bypass that portion of the 
VS-2). The VS-2 is not a kit— it 
comes fully assembled and test- 
ed and is warranteed for one full 
year. 

For further information, con- 
tact Pegasus Electronics, inc*t 
83 New Dorp Plaza. StatBn Is- 
fand NY 10306. Reader Service 
number 488. 

PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS 

Encon Corporation, autho- 
rized distributors of Solarex 
photovoltaic products, has a 
publication entitled The Com- 
plete Photovoltaic Systems Cat- 
alog which can answer many of 
your questions about solar ener- 
gy conversion and distribution. 
The catalog covers an Intro- 
duction to photovoltaic sys- 
tems, photovoltaic cells and 
panels, renewable energy bat- 
teries, charge controllers and 
metering devices, ac power in- 
verters, how to select a work- 
able system for your needs, ba- 
sic 12- volt systems, large dci 
small-ac systems, components 
and accessories you will need, 
solar demonstrators, education- 
al materials, marine and recrea- 
tional paneis, and much more. 

If you have an interest in di- 
rect conversion of sunlight to 
power, you will enjoy this cata- 
log and overview of the entire 
subject, A price guide as well as 
an applications questionnaire 
form are included so that you 
can obtain expert advice and as- 
sistance for potential applica- 
tions that you may have in mind. 
Encon will assist you with your 
questions and needs in solar 
applications. 

For further information, con- 
tact Encon Corporation, 27584 
Schoolcraft, Livonia Mi 48150. 
Reader Service number 479. 



MASTER CONTROL CONSOLE 

Alpha Delta Communications 
has just announced its new 
Master Ac Control Console 
which combines power-surge 
prolection and centralized "on/ 
off" control of several compo- 
nents. The MACC unit plugs into 
a single outlet and provides 
eight plug-in ""U" ground outlets: 
one "hot" outlet for continuous- 
ly-powered appliances such as a 
clock, for example, and seven 
outlets for rndividually-control- 
labfe components. 

The front panel has rocker 
switches for the individually* 
controllable components, plus a 
master control "on/off rocker 
which alJows the entire system 
to be turned on or off at once. All 
rockers are lighted when "on.*' 

The surge- protect ion feature 
is perhaps the most important 
feature of Alpha Delta's MACC 
unit. The delicate circuitry o( 
modem solid-state electronic 
equipment is particularly vuiner^ 
able to damage from power 
surges and spikes which can be 
caused by natural or man-made 
sources such as lightning 
strikes, electric motors, trans- 
formers, wind blown snow, 
clouds, fluorescent lamps, pow- 
er outages, and the like. The 
MACC is tested to IEEE pulse 
standards and is rated at 15 A, 
125 V ac, 60 Hz, 1875 Watts con- 
tinuous-duty total for the 
console. 

Priced at $79.95 (US), the 
MACC is available from Alpha 
Delia dealers or, for S4 more to 
cover postage and handling, di^ 
rect from the factory. Alpha Del- 
ta will quote on overseas post- 
age and on the "European Mod- 
el" MACC E available with VDB 
approved socket for 240 V ac 



For further information, con- 
tact Alpha Delta Communica- 
tions, PO Box 571, Centerviile 
OH 45459. Reader Service num- 
ber 486. 



MORTTY SOFTWARE FOR 

COMMUNICATIONS 

MORTTY is a general-purpose 
communications program 
adaptable to almost any set of 
conventions in current use- It in- 
cludes ASCII and Baudot capa- 
bilities at a wide range of baud 
rates. There are 18 parameters 
for adaptation to particular con* 
vent ions such as full screen, 
split screen, full or half duplex, 
and many more. There are 15 
disk operations, Including disk 
file send, receive, direct binary 
to hex upload* hex to binary 
download, automatic message 
capture with file sequencing, 
and automatic answering of 
messages from a disk file. 

The equipment required to 
make use of the program is an 
H89 or Z89 microcomputer with 
32K of memory and an H88-3 se- 
rial interface. MORTTY repro- 
grams the serial interface for 
baud rate, etc., according to the 
communications mode select- 
ed, and does the translation be- 
tween ASCII and Baudot when a 
Baudot mode Is In use. In place 
of the H89 or Z89 with HBS^Z, you 
may use an H8 with Ht9 termi- 
nal and HB4 serial interface 
with HI 7 disk system. 

The software required is 
HOGS V. 2,0. which is the current 
Heath disk operatmg system. 
Heath claims that programs 
should be upward-compatible 
with new HDDS releases, but we 
cannot guarantee that this will 
always be true, 

The price of the MORTTY pro* 



136 73Magazine • November, 1982 



m m 



at last - everything at your 






m<k 



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$184 



Radio Equipment 
NOT Included 

F,O.B. Culver City 
(CA Residents add 6% sales tax) 



fingertips U ! 

Bring ORGANIZATION & 
CONVENIENCE to your 
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clutter and provide lots of 
space for everything you 
need - Tuners, VFO, CW 
KeyerSj Filters, Telephone, 
Log Book, Etc„, 



ANGLED REAR SHELF 
ALL PARTS FITTED 
STURDY CONSTRUCTION 
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Floor space: 39''w by 30'U 
Also: SV'w by 30''d - $199.50 

Dealers Inquiries Invited 



A Finely Crafted Piece of Furniture 

Witti a REAL Purpose . . . 

Call : (213) 837-4870 or Write for Information 

S-F Amateur Radio Services 

4384 Keystone Ave., Culver City, CA 90230 



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2 METER 90 WAH OUTPUT 

AMPLIFIER WITH 18 DB GAIN PREAMP 




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OPERATION FM or SSB (E;{]mptelfllv Fineaf] Class Aei 

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VISA, MASTER CHARGE, M.O. or C.O.D. • PHONE (713) 477-0134 

V-J PRODUCTS, INC. bos East Shaw, Pasadena, Texas 775O6 

SERVING THE ELECTRONICS INDUSTRY SINCE 1965 



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ICOM IC740 969-00 

IC701 (New) 800.00 

IC490A 569.00 

IC730 699.00 

IC3AT/IC4AT ..... 269 00 ea. 
YAESU FT230R 29900 

FT1 2395.00 

FT10ZD/3 749.00 



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Kenwood R600 ........ 299.00 

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Base/Telephone 1 49.00 

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3 Remotes 1 99.00 



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^$ee Lisf of Advertisers on page J 30 



73 Magazine • NovemberJ982 137 




MFJ's VHF converter. 



gram Is $100.00 ppd in the USA. 
Ohio purchasers should add 6% 
sales tax. Foreign prices will de- 
pend on the additional ex- 
penses of mailing. This price 
buys a printed copy of a thor- 
ough user's guide of about 60 
pages and a 5^4" hard-sector 
disk with the absolute binary 
MORTTY program. 

For further information, write 
"MOBTTY program" or ''Phi flip 
L Err)&rson" at 3707 Blanche, 
Cievefar^d Heights OH 44118. 
Reader Service number 480. 

MFJ-3i3POLicenRe 

WEATHER BAND CONVERTER 
FOR 2-METER HAND-HELDS 

MFJ has introduced its new 
compact VHF police/f ire/weath- 
er band converter for 2-meter 
hand-helds. 

It turns your synthesized 
144-148^MHz hand'heid into a 
police/fire receiver (154-158 
MHz) and gives you direct fre* 
quency readout on your hand- 
beid. A programmabie scanning 
hand-held becomes a sensitive 
programmable police/ fire 
scanner. 

You can also receive weather, 
maritime coastal, and more on 
the 160-164-MHz band. Feed- 
through allows simultaneous 

13fl 73 Magazine • November, 



scanning of both 2 meters and 
the 160-1 64- MHz band. 

A high-pass input fiiter and a 
2.5-GHz transistor give very high 
uniform sensitivity over both the 
154" 158' MHz and 1 60-1 64^ MHz 
bands. Each band is crystal-con- 
trolled for excellent stability. 

A Bypass/Off position allows 
transmitting through the con- 
verter, ft is protected against 
burnout if you transmit (up to 5 
Watts) with the converter on. 
Short direct-signal paths give 
low insertion swr. 

This compact converter mea- 
sures only 2ViX^Vzx^V^ 
inches and weighs 4 ounces- A 
singie AAA battery (not includ- 
ed) gives you months of opera- 
tion. The cabinet Is black and is 
made of rugged, lightweight 
aluminum for years of hard use, 
BNC connectors mount the con- 
verter directly between your 
handie-talkie and antenna with- 
out cables. 

For further information^ con- 
tact MFJ BoWrprises, Inc., PO 
Box 494, Mississippi State MS 
39762. Reader Service number 
483. 

NEW FROM VOCOM 

VoCom Products Corporation 
has announced two new prod- 

1982 




Channef Master's model 6128 sateilite receiver. 



ucts for the amateur 220'MHz 
band: a '"two Watts in, twenty 
Watts out" power amplifier with 
a suggested list price of $84.95 
and a "Power Pocket" for the 
Icom IC-3AT hand-held trans- 
ceiver with a suggested list 
price of $229.95. 

With the Power Pocket, the 
220-MHz operator now has the 
same advantage that he had on 
two meters: the convenience of 
a hand-held and the punch of a 
mobile rig. Styled essentially the 
same as the two-meter version, 
the 220-MH2 Power Pocket of- 
fers a large speaker, an audio 
amplifier, an rf power ampilfier, 
and a battery charger that 
meets the current requirements 
of the radio. For exampie, you 
can use the amplified hand-held 
in your car on the way to work, 
hold your own In any QSO, and 
arrive with a battery that is still 
charged... as good or better 
than it was when you started! 

For further information, con- 
tact VoCom Products Corpora- 
tion, 65 East PafBtlne Road, 
Prospect Heights It 60070. 
Reader Service number 478. 

EARTH-STATION RECEIVER 

Channel Master has just in- 
troduced a new Earth^station w^ 
ceiver, the model 6128, offering 
a wide range of features and ad- 
vanced electronics. The receiver 
is a24-channei synthesized unit 
employing a single downcon- 
verier instalied at the dish and a 
receiver unit located in the 
home. 

For simplified tuning, the fuil 
24-channel number format is 
displayed on the receiver's LED 
dlgitai channel display. Chan- 
nels are power- selected by Up/ 
Down push-buttons and fine 
tuning is provided with the as- 
sistance of the Center/Fine 
Tune meter. 



Two Priority Audio buttons 
select audio channeis (6.8 and 
6,2 MHz)t while additional audio 
channels may be selected 
manually. 

A slgnal-strangth meter 
shows the relative strength of 
received signals. The Channel 
Scan button is depressed to cy- 
cle the receiver through the 
complete horizontal channel 
range In about one second, as 
an aid to aiming the antenna. 

Automatic polarity switching 
allows one-button selection of 
any channel without additional 
polarity adjustments, and a 
built-in modulator eliminates 
the need for a separate modula- 
tor. The model 6128 is capable 
of receiving normal or Inverted 
video signals. An optional mod- 
eJ 6192 remote control unit of- 
fers the added convenience of 
remote channel selection and 
fine tuning. 

For further information, con- 
tact Channel Master, Division of 
Avnet, Inc., EHenvilie NY 12428. 
Reader Service number 482. 

NEW TS-830, TS-930, R-820 
FILTER KIT 

Fox Tango Corporation has 
announced the availability of a 
special high-quality matched-fil- 
ter kit designed to significantly 
improve the selectivity of the 
popuiar Kenwood R^820. TS-e30, 
and new TS-930 series. These 
rigs all use similar dual-conver- 
sion I'f systems with SeSO-kHz 
first and 455'kHz second inter- 
mediate frequencies, l-f band- 
width filtering at both frequen- 
cies is used to provide VBT (vari- 
able bandwidth tuning). How- 
ever, in the TS-830S modei, the 
2,7-kHz bandwidth of both origi- 
nal filters (resulting in a net 
bandwidth of 2.4 kHz with VBT 
off), the combined filter shape 



factors (1.34 with VBT off), and a 
combined ultimate rejection of 
about 80 dB leave much to be 
desked. 

Under the same conditions^ 
the Fox Tango filters (both 
e-pole discrete crystal units in- 
stead of the original monolithic 



and ceramic types) each have a 
bandwidth of 2.1 kHz (net band- 
width of 1.99 kHz), a combined 
shape factor of 1.19 (the lower^ 
the better), and an ultimate re- 
jection greater than 110 dB (the 
higher, the better). The effects 
are even more pronounced when 



VBT is used to narrow the oper- 
ating i-f bandwidth to reduce 
QRM. 

The matched-pair fiiter kit, 
complete with detailed instruc- 
tions, two 2.1-kH2 Fox Tango fil- 
ters (guaranteed for one year), 
and ail needed cables and parts, 



is bemg offered at an introduc- 
tory price of $150 plus $3 for 
shipping ($5 for air). 

For further information, con- 
tact Fox Tango Corporation, PO 
Box 15944, W. Palm Beach FL 
33406; (3Q5)S83-9587. Reader 

Service number 477, 



REVIEIV 



COM RAD INDUSTRIES 

CR1720A 

"MOBILE EAR" ANTENNAS 

Jim Waldron of Com-Rad has 
been interested in space-saving 
antennas for a iong time, and he 
has built and tested dozens of 
them with the idea that a better 
antenna can be built and is 
much needed. Jim's idea of a 
"better'' antenna is one that is 
small, compared with a fuli-size 
antenna for the band selected; 
one that is rugged and has a low 
profile: one that is easy to tune; 
and one that is duck soup fo( 
mobile operation, yet may be 
used in portable or fixed opera- 
tion as weli. 

At first glance, the IVIobile 
Ears look something like a cross 
between a giant coij and a short 
dipole, and that is almost exact- 
ly what they are. The iarge-diam- 
eter helix is resonated to fre- 
quency by the capacitance-to- 
ground of the adjustable '"reso- 
nator"— a capacity hat which is 
basically two telescoping whip 
antennas mounted above the 
coif and parallel with the roof of 
the automobile. The helix radi- 
ates verticaliy-polarized rf ener- 
gy in the radial, rather than axi- 
al, mode. . .similar to that from 
a conventional vertical antenna. 

The CR1720A comes from the 
factory with a large magnetic 
mount that will defy almost any 
attempt to remove it accidental: 
ly from the roof of your car once 
it has been placed in position. 
The shunt feed has been facto^ 
ry-preset to provide the proper 
50"Ohm feedpotnt impedance, 
and a UHF chassis-type rf con- 
nector {SO-238) Is located on the 
center support pillar just above 
the mounting base. Although it 
is normally used with the mag- 
netic mount supplied by Com- 
Rad, the Mobile Ear can be used 
with any mount that is connect- 
ed directly to ground, such as 
groundplane radiais or the like. 



The reason for this is that the 
coaxiai cabie is connected to 
the antenna rather than to the 
mounting base; for proper oper- 
ation, the base of the antenna 
shouid be grounded. For exam- 
pie, you might wish to repiace 
the magmount with a perma- 
nent base for the home station, 
and this can be done by using 
the 3/8-24 bo it at the bottom of 
the antenna — the one that the 
magmount screws into. 

The CR1720A comes com- 
pfeteiy assembled, except for at- 
tachment of the telescoping 
whips to the top of the support 
pillar. This is easily and quickly 
done by sliding the setscrew 
ends of each whip over the 
5/16-inch stubs at the top of the 
support pillar and tightening the 
set screws. 

After you have mounted the 
antenna in the desired location 
on your car roof, connect an swr 
bridge in the Mne between the 
antenna and your transceiver or 
transmitter by means of a short 
length of coaxial cable, placing 
it as close as practical to the an- 
tenna itself (within two or three 
feet). Set the telescoping whips 
to MJDproximately 50 inches 
each, and set your transmitter to 
the desired operating frequen- 
cy. Apply a smali amount of 
power and look at the swr. Small 
incremental adjustments of 



whip length by sliding the ends 
in or out {out— ox longer— to 
iower the frequency and in— or 
shorter— to raise the frequency) 
will quickly provide a 1:1 vswr. 
Observe the lowest possible swr 
that you can get with your par- 
ticular vehicle, if it isn't less 
than about 1,5:1, you can move 
the clamp ring of the shunt feed 
in tiny Increments to achieve a 
perfect match. In the case of the 
test antenna, this wasn't neces- 
sary, as a perfect 1:1 match was 
obtained immediately. 

I checked the bandwidth after 
achieving a perfect match and 
found that the frequency could 
be moved 65 kHz in either direc- 
tion from the resonant frequen- 
cy without exceeding 2:1 vswr. 
This means that with most rigs 
you can operate over your favor- 
ite phone or CW segment of the 
20-meter band without any re- 
tuning at aii. Of course, if you 
are a perfectionist, you can 
achieve exact matching at any 
frequency within the band ... no 
sweat. 

In the case of the test anten- 
na, the inner sections of the 
whips were fully extended and 
theoutersections only partly ex- 
tended. This gives the iargest 
possible diameter at aii times. I 
resonated the antenna at 14.025 
MH2 and found each whip 
length to be exactly 53 y* rnches, 
measured from the surface of 
the support pillar. On the phone 
portion of twenty meters, I 
found that 14,3 MHz required a 
whip length of only 48 Vi inches. 



This is likely to vary slightly from 
car to car because of the differ- 
ent sizes of roof area, etc. A sta- 
tion wagon, for example, wil! 
have more groundplane area 
than a tiny subcompact, but 
both wiil work! 

No doubt you are anxious to 
hear about results, and I won't 
disappoint you. The twenty-me- 
ter Mobile Ear really works. After 
tuning the antenna to reso- 
nance and tiring up the 73 
FT-707 transceiver (with my 1980 
Olds Omega parked in my drive- 
way), I found myself in the mid- 
dle of the WAE contest on Sun- 
day afternoon, August 15th. I an- 
swered many calls and received 
replies from each one. All were 
599. Now, ni admit that this Is 
often the case in a contest, to 
make things easier for the report 
giver, but I got an answer to the 
first call every time! Not only 
that, but when I called CQ I got 
answers, too. In the space of on- 
ly a few minutes ! had worked 
UTS. UQ2, DL7, 021, 0H5, UK5, 
G4, N9, m, and W4 iands! (Nat- 
urally, the US stations don't 
count, but I wanted to try the an-* 
tenna.) To date, I've not done 
much with phone, as I am pre- 
dominantly a CW operator. 
However, a few contacts up 
around 14.300 have been made 
with good results— G3, for ex- 
ample, . and others. 

f noticed that the noise pick- 
up of the antenna is surprisingly 
low compared with other verti- 
cals i've tried. One possible ex- 
planation could be that the com- 




Com-Rad's Mobile Ear antenna. 

TSMagazine • November, 1982 139 



ponents are horizontally-config- 
ured and thus less subject to 
man-made or natural QRN. 

I should mention that the 
CR1720A Is beautifully made— 
the helix is heavy-duty aiuml* 
num tubing and the whips are 
stainless steeL The supporting 
pillar appears to be heavy-wall 
PVC and the magmount ts 
chrome-ptated steeL Everything 
considered, the CR1720A is a 
very fine portable/mobMe/fixed 
antenna, one that the 73 staff 



really liked. You ought to know 
that the antenna doesn't need to 
be removed to put my car in the 
garage, so yours shouldn't need 
to be removed either, unless you 
want to. In public parking facili- 
ties, just slide in the whips, re- 
move the coaXt take the Mobile 
Ear off the roof and stow It In the 
trunk. It takes about 20 seconds 
. . . and» best of all, it can be re- 
mounted and ready to go in 
about the same time. In my 
case* 1 ran the whips fore and aft 



parallel to the car's centerline 
so that they wouldn't be sticking 
out into the side, ^f you live in an 
apartment or condo where out- 
side antennas are forbidden^ 
you might find one of the Mobile 
Ears to your liking. 

By the way, the "17'^ part of 
1720 means thai this antenna 
will also work on the 18-MHz 
(17-meter) band whenever that 
becomes available to amateurs 
in the United Slates. The 



CR1720A is one of three Mobile 
Ears which cover 12/15 meters, 
17/20 meters, and 30/40 meters: 
versatile, indeed. The CR1720A 
lists for $55 plus $4 shipping, 
direct from the manufacturer. 

For further information, con* 
tact Com-Rad industries, 1635 
West H/ver Parkway, Grand Is- 
fand NY U07Z Reader Service 
number 487, 

Jim Gray W1XU 

73 Magazine Staff 



W2NSD/( 

KEVER SAY DIE 

ec//tor/a/ t>y IVayne <3r&&n 



from p&ge 8 

a lot. I suspect. It read: G/Q/ 
THE/FASTEIET/G ROWING/ 
AMATEUR/RADlO/MAGAZINe 
That's operculiform sending 
. . .and does not surprise us. 



BUNCH GETS BASHED! 

The recent Bash debacle In 
Baltimore should put an end to 
the fantasy that 8ash ts doing 
anyone any good except Bash. 1 
also hope It will shut up a lot of 
the hams vyho are moaning 
about the code and Ignoring the 
fact that Bash has totally done 
away with any need for techni- 
cal competence. , .or at least 
had until the Baltimore epic. 

As usual. Bash collected his 
most generous fees and sat 
about helping a large group of 
hopefuls to memorize the an- 
swers to the FCC exams. He 
drilled them thoroughly, as al- 
ways. But this lime the FCC had 
made some very minor changes 
in the wording of the exam, with 
the result that 89% of his group 
flunked. The word js that the 
changes were small, such as in 
some of the values in the math 
problems. 

One of the new questions for 
the General class had to do with 
the yagi antenna, asking which 
way it radiated energy. Only one 
of the Bash trainees got this one 
right! We* re dealing with mas- 
sive ignorance of amateur radio 
theory, not superficial igno- 
rance, with these memoriration 
sessions and the Bash books. 



You know, I We been writing 
about this problem for quite a 
Jong time now and I've had al- 
most zero response from read- 
ers. I have yet to hear of one 
single case where an amateur 
or a club has protested to a 
ham dealer carrying the Bash 
books. Not one case of an irate 
ham tearing up the books. No 
protests to CQ for carrying the 
ads for these pernicious 
books. No, it is obvious that no 
one really gives a damn wheth- 
er a newcomer to amateur ra- 
dio has even the slightest tech- 
nical knowledge or even the 
ability to pass a fair test. So 
why all the fuss about Morse 
code? Am I talking to a bunch 
of hypocrites? 

The Bash books and the Bash 
high-priced blitz weekend 
course are designed for one 
thing: to help people cheat at 
the FCC exams and bypass the 
entry requirements. As long as 
you don't care if people cheat to 
get a ham ticket, why should you 
care whether they are sold by 
Sears along with a two-meter 
HT? I don't see any difference. 
do you? If you really, sincerely, 
believe that people who cheat to 
get their ham licenses are sud- 
denly going to be wonderful and 
productive hams once they get 
the magic paper from the FCC, 
then you also believe in the 
tooth fairy and that Congress 
will balance the budget. In other 
words, you're crazy. 

Frankly. I'd rather see Sears 
making all that money instead 



of Bash; at least we would have 
more than a tiny dribble of new 
hams. Bash, despite his heroic 
efforts, has only been able to 
bring in a few thousand new 
hams for us. True, he's probably 
responsible for much of the few 
we've had. But if we are going to 
go along with the Bash system, 
which you have wholeheartedly 
accepted, let's go all the way 
and get some mass merchandise 
ers Into the act. 

You've seen this thing hap- 
pening and you haven't done a 
damned thing about it. Why 
should I have any respect for 
you? The hypocrisy over the 
code just makes this all the 
more irrational. And don't try to 
tell me that this is all news to 
you. Baloney, 

NO SECOND LANGUAGES 

There has been a liberally- 
fueled effort to cope with the in- 
rush of Hispanics by allowing 
them to continue to use Spanish 
In school rather than force them 
to learn English. Fortunatelyt 
there is now a gathering move- 
ment against this policy. We 
showed that the *'melting pot'* 
system worked in America and 
then we tried to ignore it. 

The more we keep newcomers 
to the United States able to 
make do without learning En- 
gtish. the more we are taking 
away from them the benefits 
which they presumably came 
here for. Td tike to see our 
schools teaching foreign lan- 
guageSt but not catering to stu- 
dents who do not have a solid 
use of English. Vd like to see the 
publication of foreign-language 
newspapers and foreign-lan- 
guage radio and television pro- 
grams discouraged. 

The lesson in Canada of how 
different languages split a coun- 
try should be heeded. When a 
group in a country holds on tight 
to its language and culture, it is 



a disruptive force. Americans 
living in other countries tend to 
stick together and avoid learn- 
ing the language as much as 
possible. This hurts both them 
and the country in which they 
are living. 

The Indians (Asian) have long 
had a problem with this. In every 
country where there are a signif- 
icant number of Indians, they 
are clannish and generate re- 
sentment with the other people. 
We don't have many Indians in 
the US, so we are nol aware of 
them, but we do see the Chi- 
nese, who have the same prob- 
lem. For many years we sort of 
accepted that the Chinese for 
some reason don't Know En- 
glish and run either laundries or 
restaurants. 

Both the Indians and the Chi- 
nese are very hard-working peo- 
ple and, I suspect, if either group 
had made an effort to Integrate 
into their new countries, they 
would have virtually taken over. 
Of course, Americans used to be 
hard-working people... and a 
few still are. * . but For the most 
part I see few remnants of this 
heritage. Perhaps we are most 
fortunate that the Chinese in 
America are so clannish and 
thus are kept from enjoying and 
benefitting from our education- 
al opportunities. 

We still live in a world where 
hard work pays off. This is one 
of the reasons we have so few 
wealthy people. Given equal op- 
portunity* I suspect that the US 
would be as proportionately 
populated with wealthy Chinese 
as it is wealthy Jews. In Taiwan, 
Hong Kong, and Singapore- we 
see how well the Chinese can do 
when they are not held down by 
Communism. Perhaps we are 
fortunate, in a way, that the po- 
liticat systems in China have 
been so destructive. Vm sure 
that the Chinese could, if work- 
ing in a free country, run circles 
around us. 



140 73 Magazine • November J982 



Wayne Green Books 




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73 Magazine • November, 1982 141 



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TEMPO S-1S2'METER HT . 

TEMPO S2 220 HT 

ALL KENWOOD & ICOM HF 

OFF. 

ALL LARSEN 2-METER ANTENNAS 15% 

OFF. 

ALL YAESU ^TEN-TEC HF RiGS I59[i OFF 

ALL HYGAIN & HUSTLER ANT. 30% off. 

ALL MFJ PRODUCTS 15% OFF LIST 

R.ADIOS, ANTENNAS & ACCESSORIES ARE 

[N NEW FACTORY SEALED CARTONS. 

lULL MANUFACTURERS WARRANTY. 

PRICES CASH & SHIPPING. CREDIT CARDS 

ADD 3%. 



SHAVER RADIO, INC. 

1 378 S. Bascom Ave. San Jose, Calif. 95 128 

408-998. 1 103 ^ 148 



CO 

Z 

=> 

o 
o 
m 

a 
o 



5 



YAESU FT-207R OWNERS 

AUTO SCAN MODULE AND BATTERY 
SAVER KIT 

15 minutes to in- 
stali; scan restarts 
when carrier drops 
off, busy switch 
controls automatic 
scan on-off. in- 
cludes module and 
instructions. 

Model AS-1. $25.00 

^^ FT-207R BATTERY SAVEI^ KIT 
1^ MODEL BS-1 $14.95 

' No more dead batteries due to memory back- 
up 

'30% less power drain when squelched 

'Stmple to install; step by step instructions 
and parts mcitjded 

'4 mA memory backup reduced to 500 AA. 

'45 mA receiver drain reduced to 30 mA. 

'Improved audio fidelity and loudness 

ENGINEERING CONSULTING 

P.O. 80X3966 '^'^oo 

ANAHEIM, CAUFQRNiA B2803 




DX TXT 1.0 

A Great Circle Calculator plus Log in an 
Apple® Computer. Information on 467 
specific woridwiiJe locations (318 + 50 
states + ...). Enter your coordinates and 
DX TXT will calculate the short path 
beam heading and distance from your 
QTH. Any location callable by PrefiK, 
location name, or record number. Data 
bank includes geographic descriptor, 
specific location, IRC, and Zone. 

Requires an Apple® Computer with one 
Disk II and DOS 3.3. Printer function 
optional. 



Demo Disk av^ailable 



(A.rk. TS'sidenTi add 4"^} 
Dealer Inquines Invaed 



LANNES JOHNSON 



TOO Plaza Slreet 



W'esl Hefena. AR 72390 
1-501-572-7511 
TRS^flO VIRSJON AVAILABLf SOON 



THE . r B 



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& STEELI 




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PROUD OF! COMMERCIAL 
QUALITY at 1/10 THE COST it 

GUARANTEED! ^^«^p\ 

not incl. 



MO. COD OR CREDIT CAliaS. 
ALL ORDERS 11 J liS PUH&S- 
S.UJ FOREIGN ORDERS. ADD 

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TO PiH. 



$ 




ASSOCIATES 

P aOX 757 

1050 N{ 55 IN AVE. 

ilLVEIl SPRINGS . FU . 33«B» 



2225 

+ 2.50 




WANTED FOR CASH 

Your Military Surplus Electronic 
Material ■ Airffirce. h!avy or Afmy 
EqiiipmenE. Moaules. Tubes or Parts 
rt cosis noihrng 10 get our higtiest offer 

Call Collect NOW 
201-440-8787 

35 Ruta Court 
South Hackensack. N.J. 07606 

SPACE ELECTRONICS Co. 

Our 22nd Year 




i>'l62 



'336 



DIGITAL DISPLAY 



DAY 




FREE TRIAL 

YAESU 

HEATH 

DRAKE 

COLLIMS 

KENWOOD 



NE>I YflCSU [UGHAL DISPLAYS CONVEdTFU FOR YAESU KEfiWOOD HlAIH 
tailim m Wmi TRAHCElyi:RS R£C£IVEftS OT TIVViSniTflRS, 
5A03VE REP LEU DIGITS READ OmK TO 10 tiz. REAR ?AN£L 10 H7 
□ [617 DEFEAT SWETCH- fftOH COLD PWX. 100 H;. OR] FT [N 2^* HftS. 
i m" HIGH, q 1/2" WI15E £ B U'l" DEEP, >TE£L CAST IS BLACK. 

LOWER FR&WT PA»tEL E5 SHilSrtED ALlJIIiriUK. UnlT^^ t-09, *1DDEL NUMBERS 
UNUERtlMeO WORK UllMOUT *NV IN5TALLATIPN' BIT PLi^GSIN-G IWTCt 
E5(l5TlHti JACKS an TML aftDlDS, MODELS WITH AH » ASTERISK tyiVt 
A i'DkrtR SUPPL'V;^T*1ANSFDTH1ER AflL i?Pf ?hl:TiH, jLL >*ftS T^BE PA [ , 

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'^T:uJ. jifRiF^ FTSQ] !aS20t(&E.) PLUG lhtu si ah jacx fw 

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*7 ;>j jl H J £ S *^>lh 5Efl L Li '32 5 SEKEES.'R"*! 5tRlES HW ftE.CJilW£R3 

•FTlOO 'FTiJfltl li mj.l 'FT560 i 570' "UHlDO-lDl 'SEICID-W 



•SS30Q-3D3 *HRi6S0 — 



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vail roR fT221URl n^ SerVi^L . n22I 15700. 7 D16.— mM 
S£Rn U.Sr CASHIERS CHLt>f Cfli K.U.. 30 IMlf WQHtY EACK'. ¥«|>*^ 

a^TuRN PD^TASL. VIRITE 'HITH *1DDc i; SEt?3>iL WO i ^-UR INfORnATIflN, 
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Blaine uash, 
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CBQil) 530 11551 



20^52 4aA AVE, 
LAKGU^.¥ R.t. 



142 73 Magazine • November, 1982 



«» 



C.B. SPECIAL 

{Repeat of a sell out) 

CONVERT THESE TO 

IOMETER FM 

Ne^ Hy-Gajn 40 channel- printed ChfCu'l 
boards assembly (Squelch pot. volume 
coniroi and charrnel swilcti not indudedl 

Boards sold as is. Djmensidn 6"X6" 

t-g pes $7.50 SB. 
10-49 pea $6.50 ea. 

(While quantlTJes lasfi 

REMOTE 40 CHANNEL C.B. 

ReFTiot^s have a metal trame Speaker, 
ptasttc case, and conirol- mcc nol included 



SoJd as is 



$14.95 ea 



C.B. BARGAIN 

C B boards rrnssing parts or damaged 
Can bfi used for spare pans. Buy several" 

$3.50 da 

Ofder intormaifon Please add %A 00 fof 
S/H Via UFS COD'S accepted for cders 
lOEanng %bO 00 or fnore Horida residents 
ad:d 4%^ales tax Minimum ordeJ SIS.OD 
Fort^gn <»rders US funds only add 20% for 
S/H MASTER CARD and VISA accepted 

Surplus Electronics Corp. 

7294 NW 54th St. 

Miami FL 33166 ^^^ 

P.M. #305-69^8226 



CB TO TEN METER 
CONVERSION KITS 



10 METER FM—Llmiter discrimi- 
nator board with specific instruc- 
tions to fit over 80 different AM & 
SSB chassis 
SSB'AM KfTS— Now in stock 

kits for most CB models— 23 or 40 

channels 

NEW & l/SED-FM-SSB-AM 

converted QB.'s in stock 

ANEXTER MARK ANTENNAS 

—You saw them at Dayton. Now in 

stock the HW-3 three band helewhip 

that covers 10—16—20 meters with 

no traps 

FREE CATALOG- Write or call 

today INDEPENDENT 

CRYSTAL SUPPLY COMPANY 



141 Rt 6A,. Box 183 

SandwIchp Ma 02563 0183 

(617)6884302 



i^7S 



> > 



"0" BYTE < < 



All Prices Incfude Shipping and Tax In \tm U.S.A. 
ALL DISK m^ WARRANTED againsl material de 
Jects for 90 days from dale of purchase. 

• 5 1/4 inch DisKef tes (sot I sectored K Center flein 
forcing Rmg. Jacket and plastic box-stand = $27 
for bOK of 10 lo 20. 20 to 100 «s $25 per bojt, 

• SYMTEC HIGH RES LIGHT PEN — With SOff- 
ware - $1 85.00 

• 16K RAM CARD for the APPLE 11 i3^ II + 
BARE BOAflD= 30.00 

• PADDLE AOAPPLI only = S27.S0 

• MAGIC KEYBOARD only = SSe.OO 

• MICROBUFFER II For most pmtefs 32K = 
S2SD.0D 

Ep&on Parallel l6K = t135,00 
Epson Serial fiK ^ S13S.Q0 

• ECHO II Speech Synthesizer w*th So ff ware on 
3.3 disk and Speal<i&r ^ Si 70.00 

• THUNOERCLOCK PLUS with software ^ $125.00 
BSR X-10 INTERFACE OPTION = $45,00 
DOS-DATER DISK = $20.00 

PASCAL SOFTWARE DISK = $20.00 

• RAMDISK-320 - S1 225.00 
Advertised in SofiTaiK 

• I will carry olfrer items m ihe future Tf yoy don't 
see what you need let me know. Coming soon 
VISA chargmg and computer ordering. 

Most products carry a 90 day warranty. 

Tlie prices may change without notice. 

Ptease send ORDERS *ith payment 
and inquiries to: 



?53 



BIT "O" BYTE 

P.O. Box 60972 

Sunnyvale, CA 94088 




HIGH PERFORMANCE 
PRESELECTORS 



MODEL P50 to P50D 




• 50 - 500 MHz 

• Ultimate rejection over 00 liB 

• Five large helical resonalofs 

• Low noi^e 

« Hi^h overload resistance 

• Typtcal rejection ligores: 

±B00 kHz at 144 MHz: -30 m 
±1.6 MHz 31 220 MHz: -40 dB 
±5 MHz tl450 MHz: ^45 dB 

• The solutmn (o mierference. inlermail and 
de^ens problems on repeaters 

• 12V DC operatiati 

• Dimertsiens only 1.6 t IM i 4,75 excliKt- 
ing connectors 

• Custom tuned to your frequency 

• Lnw cost — only S59,95 

• AJlow S2.00 lor shipping and handling 

We nave ^ cofnpiete line O^ \i^^%^^\\w a^C receiv- 
er slrtps and syntfiesizers tor Amaieur and com- 
mertiat u^ Write or call fCK our free catalog 

We wfe^comi Ma^lerC^rd or VISA 

GLB ELECTRONICS 



1952 Clinton St., By Halo, N. Y. 14206 
1(716) 824-7936, 9 to 4 ,.143 



J 



? PORT APE ATER® 



^^ 



$179.00 assembled |^ 100 A. S99.O0 assembled 

unit INSTANT REPEATER *'°"'* 

*4Chaiu]elPROM 
CW I Der 



'Works with any 

ANY BAND ANY MODE typ' ^^^^^ 



*VOXorCOR 
operation 

*2S0 volt 
switching 

capability 

*AiiInstftiit 
Repeater 




«**■ mm w , \ ' ^ ^ ^ 

PORTA PEATER 



■ * 



* Complete Timer 
Fnncliona 

'Btillr In Test 
FiinctloDS 

* 20 Page 
TecimicAl ManuaJ 



(Fully tested, programmed, assembled) -^302 

W-S ENGINEERING P.O. BOX 58, PINE HILL. N.J. 08021 

I (201'8520269} | 



1 





I Put Your Computer I 
■ "Gii-The-Air" ■ 




The Interface 



tm 



Sugg. Price $189.95 

Your personal computer becomes a complete CW/ 
RTTY /ASCII send and receive terminal witii The inter- 
face linking it to your transceiver. 

if you own an Apple 11 or Apple 11 Plus, Atari 400 or 800, 
TRS-80 Color computer, or ViC-20, The interface will 
put your computer "On-The-Air". 

Software for each system features spilt screen dis- 
play, buffered keyboard, status display, and message 
ports. Attach any Centronics compatible printer for 
hard copy, software Is available, on diskette for the Ap- 
ple and program boards for the others, at an additional 
cost. 

Apple Atari ViC-20 TRS-SOC 

diskette board board board 

$29,95 $49.95 $49.95 $59.95 

see The interface at your authorized Kantronics deal- 
er, or contact: 




? Kantronics 




t9l 3) 842-7745 1 202 E. 23rd uwrence, Kansas 66044 




^See ustot ACvetusfffS on p^ge J 30 



73Magaime • November. 1982 143 



RIG TROUBLES 
GOT YOU DOWN? 

YOU COULD SHIP YOUR RIG TO 
THE FACTORY FOR REPAIR. 
YOU COULD SHIP IT TO RQ SER- 
VICE CENTER FOR REPAIR, 
BUT YOU STAND A GOOD 
CHANCE OF FIXING IT YOUR- 
SELF WITH HELP FROM YOUR 
OWN COPY OF * 'OWNER REPAIR 
OF RADIO EQUIPMENT" 
THIS BOOK WILL BE SHIPPED 
POSTPAID FROM K6R0 FOR 

RQ SERVICE CENTER 

14910 LG Blvd. 

Los Gfttos, CA 95030 



^^ 



r^^5^^ 



hiiru>-i 



BOOKS 

Dick BasH- 
ARRL 
73 BooScs 

Catlbook Co. 

MAI>S 

ARRi 
AR.CdibootcCo. 

CODE TAPES 

ARRL 



SHOP BY MAIL: 

SPECIALTIES 

QSL Cofds 
Log Book^ 

Coo K - Seol 5'dr 50Vo4b 
Covercraft Duit Covers 



MAGAZINES 

Csirigle copies > 

Byte 

Fbpubr C&mpMting 

QST 

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73 

80 MicTticofTiputer 

Desk Top Computlnpg 



mnCH HILL SALES 

PO.Box234 Peter borou9h,NH 03458 

C6a3J)924-79S9 
CatdtogSr 



V&A 



Subscrfption 

Prbblim? 



73 Magazine does no! keep subscrip^ 
tron records on the premises, 1 here- 
fore caUing us only adds time and 
doesn't solve the problem. 

Please send a description of the 
problem and your most receni ad* 
dress label to: 



73 Magazine 
Subscription Dept. 
PO Box 931 
Farmmgdale, NY 11737 



Thafik you and enpoy your sutiscfiplian 



rji!*i<iie% 



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•KACT leiiii H^adifigi - IncTudifig DX to Ifflu! 

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SEND Can, HAtiit?. Addr^ll, Tl(tt« Zciria . OTfl trfu 
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PO But ISB ^' ft?f-4l>86 {01- 17^) 

U^ulfcjl. H*y1. Hdwill 4*n2 V [5* HC *^ 147 



SALE SALE SALE 



GOING-OUTOF- 
BUSINESS SALE 

Last Day-Dec 31ST 

1982 

CALL US! 

If we have what you want in stock 



ship it FREE! 

No charge cards... 
fshier's check 



Ben Franklin Electronics 
1 1 SVi N. Main Hillsboro KS 67063 

316.947-2269 ^439 



NEW 

DX 

ANTENNAS 

QUALITY -ECONOMY 




WE MANUFACTURE: 

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TRI BANDYAGI BEAMS 

CENTER INSULATORS - BALUNS 

DUMMY LOADS- AND MORE' 

All DX products are tuNy guaranteed 
Send large S A S E, for free catalog 
Dealer inquiries are welcome 



IIX Kiyiinl 1:0. 

P.O. BOX 37, Locon^ II 61540 
Phone ( 3Q9]i34A^ 20fl 7 



FREE CATALOG 




NEW! 

CATALOG OF 

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Also contains iesi eqtiiptneni 

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1 



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mare than 2000 quality iT^tni. Vuuf si naif 
«i0itfi:eft>r hdrd-lo-find prcvisiij'i^ iimJs drid 
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sck'nti^ls., fngmeers*^ in^iiTrunieni mrirKan- 
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aoefioe^Seru^^^wj^uj^^^ip^odav* 



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this publication 
is QVQibble in 
mkrofofm 



• J 



University Microfilms International 



300 North Zeeb Road 

Dept PR, 

Ann Arbor, Ml 4S106 

U.S,A. 



18 Bedford Row 
Dept PR 

London, WC1R4EJ 
Enaland 



PRESERVE 

BINDERS & 
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Keep your issued d1 73 Magazine togeltinet. har^^^r 
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Send check or money iTnlef to; 

JESSE JONES BOX CORP 

P O Boa 5120 

Phdadelphia. PA 191 4t 

AllohV 4 to 6 weeiks tof delivery 



144 73 Magazine • November, 1982 



4S0TR0N ANTENNAS 

THE BEST THINGS 

come in little packages... 

FOR 80-40-20 METERS 





THE PROFESSIONAL 

TOUCH TONE 

ENCODER 



An ultra high quality 
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operate and instdll. Caii or writs for free 
catatog and informationl (213) 852-1515 
or P.O. Box 3435, Hoilywood, CA 90028. 



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• Covers 100 10 185 MHz ml kH2Steps with ttiumb- 
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50 {ihms • Op&rates on 1 2 Vdc @ 1 /2 Amp * Avail- 
able far immediate delivery * $3^9.95 plus shipping 

• Add-on Accessories available to extend freq. 
range, add irrfinite resolution, voice and sub-audible 
tones, AM, precision 120 dB caflbrated attenuator 

• Call for details • Dealers want &d worldwide. 



VANGUARD LABS 

196^23 Jamaica Ave., HqIII«, NY 11423 
Phon»: (213) 468-2720 



1^311 



M^ ENGINEERING'S 

VHF H.T CONVERTERS 



• DOUBLE BAND HC-V, HC-U2 



♦ SINGLE BAND HC-V220 



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HC-V 

154-158 
159-163 



HC-U2 

460-464 
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221-225 



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weight: 

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S59.95 



M-SQUARED 
ENGINEERING, INC. 

1446 LANSING AVE. 
SAN JOSE,CA. 95118 

CALL S^/VOy 408-266-9214 



HC-V 

$47.45 



HC'V220 

$54.95 



DEALERS 
WELCOME 



Shipping fticluded 

Calif, residents add 
6.5% sales tax 



CONTACT-80... 

An ultra sophisticated yet sirTiple to 
operate RTTY System for the demanding 
operator at an affordable price. 

Features: 

• Disk \fO; SAVE, LOAD. KILL & DIR. . , 
•TRI 'SPLIT screen, userdafinad . 
»10 CANNED MESSAGES 
•DVNAMrC BUFFER ALLOCATION . , 
•Live HARDCOPY tor parallel printers. . . 
•Keyboard CONTROL ot STATION. , . 
■AUTO m; RTTV, CW (seSectabi© ON/OFF), , . 
•CLOCKED OUTPUT rate. . 
•All BAUDOT $pa«ds plus ASCII C110y. . . 
•NAME, DATE, TIME from oompiJter. . . 
•On screen BIT PATTERN SCOPE. . . 

Requires TRS-W. f\AOD-iU with your CALL SiGN 
plus TU with soma foop. 

DISK !/0; V^RStON. ^279.00 

CASSETTE tJO: VERSION $229.00 







omm 



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Post Paid 



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4493 Orleans Dr., Dunwoody, GA 3033fi 
(404) 946-9314 



PACKET RADIO 
TREASURE TROVE 



MODE^ ^^^^_ POWER 

BOAnO ^^^^^ SUPPLY 

aOARP ■ t|l I *^ 

COMPUTER i ^ — iwuMtJ 

SURPLUS FINAWCIAL TERMINAL CONTAINING: 

• aoa TYPE MODEM BOAHD: 0-1800 baud, separale 600 ohm 
audio xfmre. TTL ti\g\lai l-O. ,5x 5.5" 

• aO^OA CPU BOARD: With sock&ts 1or 4^q 27005. Also ir 
sock&ts S^Sl Programmable Commu-nicatiofvs lotarface 
(USAf^Tif, 6253 Triple Programmable Inlerval TitnaT. 3223 
Syslcm CQn[foiler.-3-&tal*? BvS Driver. 256 byles HAM. £9 other 
SUppotI IC&, xl-iil, OfOck IC. 7 5 K tO' 

• ENCLOSED POWER SUPPLY: Willi pwr cord A swftch +5V 
ftf 2.5A. -l-12Vi" 3&0ma. -5Vr+r 25l!|ima. pHus 2 uirtregulated 
WFray.t?!> lor <iisplav 3 x 4 >? S" 

• DOCy MENTATION PACKAGE: Irvcludes sctiamanc& & Tach- 
nicaHy 0:rientcd User Manual. 

• MISC, : £0 Key Oecimgl & Function Kay board, 1 6 Digit Fitpgr es- 
csflt Display. Mag Stripe Credft Card Reader. Speaker and 
MORE 

Units are removed fromi aen/ico and in good working csondltion. 
High oualtly modern ccnsiruclioW throughout Each es. given a full 
off-line test before shipmeni. Larige quairtity in stock. You'd have to 
bjy a lot of Euh^eys before Findmg ariolli^r gerri l^ke this, 

PRICE, SURFACE UPS IMCLUED SS5 

PQCUMEriTATlON PACKAGE $5 

ELECTROVALUE INDUSTRIAL INC. 

P0I3CI>15T-W SjQ. Hwne McJflna and 

MOPRJS PLAINS. WJ 07950 *^-J0t-> queslrQCB walcome 



PLATE TRANSFORMERS 

ALL REMOVED FROM EQUIPMENT WITH 115 

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56b ma [tJ&b WV) secondaj-y, 
115/230 V primary. ev^xb^K 
4V*". 33rbs.sh_: $34 J5 
#SS-HW201P - 2000VCT 500ma 
(1500 WV. 700 ma iniermiTientk 
7x5'/?x5". 32 lbs sU. $30, OQ 
#2Z9621/610 - 5760VCT32lma 
Of4800VCT 475rm[71&0WV); 
1 15/230V primary. 9V^xlOV^xey^". 1 1 6 lbs. sh. $65.00 

53,3 UI3500 VDC CAPACITOR ^ lO/?x4y?x3V/. 11 lt)S 

sh CSI#4W3081: MEW. $Z7.50 

TUBES-us&dchk.flllA: $9. B13:St6. 3628: S6. 50 

4Vi" sq, ROTRON MUFFIN or similar fans. 14 W, 
Liseij-chet;ked $8.95 

CHOKE #3C557N/610 - 11 Hy 500 ma 55 Ohms: 10 KV 




lest. 9x7x6", 42 \m sh.: 

#SS-P243 - 900 VCT 

16 lbs. 

1500 WVDC CAPftClTORS 

5V^x3V^x2'/3". $4. 



S1Z.&0 



250 



ma. 4i/^x4Wx3V-i". 

r&moved Irom equip.: 8 mf. 
10 ml, 5'/?x3¥4x3"; $5. 



Prices F.O a LJma. 0. * VISA. MASTERCAHD Accepted. 

Allow for Shippmg • Write for FfiEE CATALOG 

Address Oepl. 73 • Plrone; 419/227-6573 



1016 E. EUR-EKA ■ Sq- n05 ■ LIMA^ OHIO ^ ^^BQ^ 



^Sbb LfSi of Adverttsers on page 130 



73Magaiine * NovemberJ982 145 



SLEP ELECTRONICS 



GIVES TOP TRADE ON YOUR USED. . . . 
ATLAS COLLINS DRAKE ICOM 

KEN WOOD TENTEC... 

AND ON YOUR USED TEKTRONIX AND 

HEWLETT-PACKARD TEST EQUIPMENT 

ON YOUR USED AVIONIC EQUIPMENT 

AND ON YOUR USED MILITARY AVIONIC 

AND GROUND ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT 

WE OFFER NEW FACTORY— BOXED 
LATEST MODELS OF 

COLLINS CUBIC/SWAN DENTRON 

DRAKE ICOM KENWOOD TENTEC 

PLUS ALL MAJOR ANTENNA LINES 

TELL US WHAT YOU WANT 

AND WHAT YOU HAVE TO TRADE. . . 

WE'LL DO THE REST. 

Write or phone Bill Step (704) 524-7519 




Electronic 
Dtstrtbutors 



Sl9p Electronics company/ 

p. O. BOX lOO. HWY 441, DEPT. 73 
OnO. NORTH CAROLINA 28763 



1^387 



HAtH HELP 



I need a BLon<ler Tongue Ptism-maTfC 
PM-2 tQiQt to complete my OSCAfl-S 
transect ver system lor the address oi ttili 
company^, 

Mark S. K^ziuk N2DIV1I 

2623 e. mti Si 

Brooklyn NY n2^S 

I ^ould like to purchase an origlnaJ 
manual fof a Te^Uonix 3S76^ 

ElfchI Takari<fi 

142aVas«ir Rd. 

Rock ford I L G1103 



m 



1 need a scN^maTic and any other avail- 
abte mforrnation on ih^ Triplet model 3440 
oscilloscope. I will gladly pay tiosis. 

Wall WItson WALE 

4^^ Lakaftdge Rd. 

Denver CO 80219 

I need Information on a digital frequen- 
cy readout Tor my Heath HW 101 
transceiver. 

O. C. Pugh WA6HYB 

4860 12S Nonr! RIvar Ro«d 

Ocean side CA 920&S 



m 



REGENCY SCANNERS 

TT20 Atr 16900 0610 

D 100 159 DO M 100 

D30Q .araOQ M400 



iEARC AT SCANNERS 



270,00 SC3» 
2CS00 BC300 
2450Q eC300 



369.00 
339.00 
CALt 



All Bundy low profile I^C Sockets iu%\ it per pin 
Example: B pin— Bc^ 40 pin— 40c 
Ham IV Rotor— $165,00 

Columbia 8 Con (2#18/6#£2J— I7t/ft. 
Columbia RG 59v lOO foil shield TV type— Vc/h. 
Berk Tek Grey 96% RG ax-^U^H. 

US made PL 259— 10/S5.50 

Gail for Quantity Quotes 



Universal DIst 
RAYMOND RICHARD 

RT. 1. BOX25E 
CLERMONT, FL 32711 




UG IJBRedueer— lGtfSi.g9 
SO 339— 10^15.89 
3 amp fuse- 50^1.50 
Sanyo 3V Lithium- S5,95 
Gould 1.2v 600 mAn A A Ntcad 
10/314.50 1DO/S125.00 

lOOQ^S 1100.00 
GSC Reg, Power Supply 
35 Amp Rack Mt List $227.00 
SALE 1149.00 

(904)394 2511 
(313) 27S^217 

.^1S5 



* B E C * Bullet Elect rcmics Corp* P.O. BoE 401Z44E Car land, TX* 75040 (214) %79' 



■T2 



THE PRESIDENT SAYS: "HOGWASHI!' 



9 



After taking one look at the TRIPUT POWER SUPPLY our engineer declared that the 
units were worth several hundred dollars each. He pointed out the engineering, high quality 
construction and state-of-the-art integrated design in support of his position. The President 
of BEC more pragmatically pointed out the already fu!f warehouse and the two trailer truck 
loads of power supplies waiting in the parking lot, and set the price to move them QUICKLY! 
We have a large quantity, but the supply won't last long. The only thing we ask is please read 
the ordering rules. 

QUALITY DOUBLE SfDED GLASS BOARD 



*»« t 



t'l 



ti 



:^#/' 



't 



I 



meV @ 20A MODiFICATJON 

8y cciang^g a lew parts on th« b04ifd tM Tripui 
Pcmm Supply wiil do II - 14V (adiumblej at yp lo 
^OA. P»r1ect tor rrui!2maierii^air<mp^W«sendste^ 
Hy jtffp instruct ID <^5 ^niA neCHMTy pi$%i Mod- 
ineiitiofi per ^mlnjcUonm wHI not vtrid Ihe 30 day 



;' 



■:^^^' 



REGULATOR ASSEMBLY 

(part of unit) 



62.50 



Plus Ff eight 

21 lbs. 
6 X 5% X 12 



COMPLETE UNJT 

(as you receive it) 

ORDERS SHIPPED WITHIN CONTINENTAL U.S. ONLYl 

ORDERING RULES 
T Mail check or MO for S62:50 + $5.00 for shipping or phone (214) 270-3553 
to charge VISA/MC or COD order. (UPS COD oniy, add $2.50 COD fee) 
2. Texas residents include 5% sales tax, 
3 Orders for this unit will be shipped within 48 HOURS or we pay the treighU 

(weekends or hoi id ays excluded) 
4. ONE TIME OFFER! LIMIT TWO (2] SUPPLIES PER CUSTOMER, 



+12V @ 7A; +5V @ 10A; -lav @ SA 

■ UNIT IS COMPLETELY ASSEMBLED! 

• Fused primary and DC sections 

• HUGE SHIELDED TRANSFORMER 

• 2% Load & Line Regulation 

• Low Ripple (< I00mv) 

• Short Circuit Proteclion 

• Ovorvoltage Protection on an three 
oytpuls 

• 25A Bndge Rectifier 

• Over 60.000 mfd of filt&rs 

« High Efficiency Switchmg Regulator 
reduces heatsink area 

• Schematics and sarvice guide included 

• Thermal Shutdown 

• Statis LEOs (3) 



140 73 Magazine • November, 1982 



lamsa^j the first name in Counters ! 



9 DIGITS 600 MHz $129 







The CT-90 is the mosi vcrsaiiie, feature packed cmiTiter avqilabk for less 
tha/] S.^OO.OOI Advanced design Teatures include; ihjrce isckcuble gate iimc«, 
nine digits g^le indicator and a unique display hold function which holds the 
displayed count after the inpul stpiaJ is retitoved' Altix a lOmHz TCXO time 
baoc if used which enables rjuy zem beat calibrafiofi checks sgainsl WWV. 
Optionally; uiiDiemaJ Jticad baitery padLextemaJ tinie base ii^^ut and Micro- 
powef t^gb itabiity cryiut oven time baae miw avaiUhiE. The CT-90. 
peffofmance ymi can coiim oft 



SpfClFlCATlONSj 



WIRED 



Rdii^e 


20 Hi to 600 MHi 


Scniiitivit>- 


Leis than 10 MV to 150 MHi 




U&s than 50 MV to 500 MHz 


Rescludcn: 


O.J Hi 1 10 MHt rimgej 




1.0 Hz (60 MHi range) 




10.0 Hz 4600 MHf rsngel 


Disptay: 


9 difin 0.4" LEO 


Time baie; 


SiandnnHO.OOO mHi, t pfan 2040-^0 




OptMMiaJ M K^n> power o«:efM3.t ppin 20-40 X 


Pnwrr 


S-IS VAC J« 130 mm 



7 DIGITS 525 MHz $991^ 



WIRED 




SPECIFICATIONS 


Rungei 


20 Ut to 525 MHi 


Seniitivily: 


Less th»n 50 MV m 150 MHi 




U^i thin 150 MV to 500 MHi 


AetoluiioiL 


1.0 Hi 15 MHz rvige) 




10.0 Hi 4 50 MHinn^^ 




t00.0 Hi(500 MHz mo^l 


Dapl.f: 


7diif&0-4- LED 


Ttme base 


1.0 ppffl TCXO 20-40 C 


Power 


12 VACii 250 ma 



The CT-70 breats the price barrier on lab qualfty frequency counter i 
Dchine features such a^ three rrequeTicyraiigEr^i each with pre- ampiific At iuTV 
dual te lettable gjte tunes, and g^te activity indication make measurcirteniji a 
snap The wide frequemry range enables you to acctiraiely measure iignaJi 
from audio thru UHF with j ppta ftccur*c> - ihat'i .0001 %! The CT-7D ts 
ihe afttwer to all yotir measurement nc^b, in the field lab or ham iliack. 



CT-70 wired 1 yeflrwairajity S99.95 

CT' 70 K it, 90 day parts war^ 

ruiy 84,95 

AOt AC adapter 3 95 

IP I Mk!«d p«cfc -i- AC 

adapte r ^ chaffer 1 2.95 




7 DIGITS 500 MHz $79^5 



PRICES: 




MtNl VDO wired 1 ytK 




WBiranty 


S79.95 


AC'Z Ac KJapter for MINI 




\m 


3.93 


3FZNicwlp*ck«idAC 




adlpCer/chaipif 


tim 



Here's a handy, genera] purpose counter that provides most counter 
functions at an unbelievable price. The MINI-] 00 doesn't have the fttU 
frcquertc)' range or input impedance qualities found in higher price unitj^ but 
for biasic RF siptal meiiurementi, it caa^tbe beaf Accurate meosuremenu 
can be made from L MHx all the way up to 500 MHz wiih excellent sensiuvity 
EhrDujhoui ilie rmnge, and the nvo ga^ timet kel you aelect ihe resdutiCHt 
desired. Add the nicad p«ck Ofxion and the MINI- 1 00 makes an ideal additiom 
to yoQT tool box For "in-tht-fiehf' freqacncy chedu and repairs. 



WIRED 


SPECIFrCATlONS: 


Range 

Stnsitivity 

ile&olution, 

Display: 
Time base: 
Power: 


J MHi to 500 MHz 
Uu than 25 MV 
100 Hz 1 slow gste) 
1.0 KHf (fail gate) 
1 m^^ 0-4 " LED 
10 ppra 20-40 C 
$ VDC « 200 ma 



DIGITS 600 MHz $1591^ 



WIRED 



«m, 



'***^»Winfcft 



^ »"~ H*, 



SPECIFICATIONS! 






m- 



Range: 
Senstttvityt 

RjeiolutiarE 

DisplayT 
Time base 
Powen 



20 Hi 16 600 MHi The CT-S J» a ver sat ile lab be mrh cou nter that wfll lueasure up Ui 600 MHi 

Lesi than 25 mv to 1 50 MMi ^yj g jjgit precision. And one of its best features is Ihe Receive Frequency 

Adaplei. which tumi the CT'50 into a digital readmit for any receiver. The 
adapter is easily proframmfil for any receiver aod a simple cocmectioii to the 
rccervcf's VFO is all ihatis nquircd for tise Adding the receiver adapter in no 
way tmJSs the operatiofi of the CT50» the adapter can be cocivcnienlJif 
switched on or otT. Ttic CT'50, i eovnlcr ihat can work doubtv-dn^ 



Less than 1 50 mv to 600 MHi 
1.0 Hi (60 MHi rafige) 
10.0 Hz (600 MHz raAg*) 
S ditit»0.4' LED 
20 ppm 20-40X 
no VAC or 12 VDC 



PRICES: 

CT50 wired I year warranty 

CT'50 Kit, 90 dA> juru 

wamnty 

RA^J. receiver adapcer kit 

RA -1 wired and prfrpfogiutk- 

mod (tend copy of receiver 

ichemaiicji 



S159,95 

119.95 
14,95 



29.95 



iiiiti: 



DIGITAL MULTIMETER $99fiRED 



PRlCfi% 




DM XO wired 1 ve&wBiTirty 


S99.95 


[>M^700 Kit. 90 diy puts 




WKnwPty 


79.95 


AC'i, AC adaptor 


i.n 


BP-J. Nic*d puck -KAC 




adipiei/eteafcer 


19.95 


MM. Probe kit 


2.95 



The Dm -7 0^1 off era profession^] t^uwlitv performdnce ai a huhbyist price. 
Fearurci itirludei 26 different rangri and 5 functions, all arranigcd in a 
conve^^icfit, rMV to usr foTmal- Meaaurements are di^!»laved on a Iir^ IV^ 
^mu ^ inch L£D re*dcmt with Bututnanc- decimal plaecfneru. suftoauuif 
pobrinr'. u*Te*rfcnier itidi(=iaoft and overload prorvcrion up to 1 250 volts on all 
r^Aftei. makuiR ti vtrtuaUv ^ooi-pmct^. The DM-700 kK^grew, i handsofne, 
fci hl:feclt. nLi||0t<ii ABS c^At wnh convrtiimE rrcrwrrablr rilt hjil makes it an 
ideal addrtHm to any liiofj. 



SPECIFICATIONS 


DG'ACvoiur lOOuV to 1 KV, 5 rnniei 


DC/AC 




^rrent 


OJuA to 2.0 Amp9^ 5 rangei 


Resii^anee 


OJ ohmi to 10 Megohms 6 ranges 


bi|nt 




unpedJtiicc 


10 Megohms. DC AC volts 


Ai^CUt^f. 


0.1% bKic DC voha 


power 


4 C «Us 



AUDIO SCALER 



For high resolution audio measunernenii, mulliplies 
UP in h'equency. 

• Great for PL tones 

• Mulljphes by 10 or 100 

• 0.01 Hz resolutionf 

S29.95 ICit S^9.95 Wired 



ACCESSORIES 

Telescopic whip antenna ■ BNC plug, .._♦♦, S 7.95 

High impedance probe, tight ii>adi;tlg , , »'**■*■*-',■*■ ,.*v* t 15.95 

Low pass probe^ for audio measurements ^ , . . 1 53% 

Direct probe, general purpttae usage , i t.^fv 12.95 

Tilt baa for CT 70, 90, MINMOO .-..., J,95 

Color hum calibiMion unit, cjltbratcs cotprier 

a^ain^r cti|f*r TV signjil ^ - 1 4 .95 



COUNTER PREAMP 

For measuririK extremely weak sj finals from 10 lo 1,000 
MH;. Srna|] s(ie. pciwered by plkijij tronsformcr-irnrludeii. 

• Flat 25 dh gain 
« BNC CoiLnecton 

• Great for ^mrTing RF with pick-up loop 

S34.95 Kit S44,95 Wired 



ramsey ckectmnic's, hnc. 

2575 Baird Rd. Penfield, NY 14526 



^ 62 



PHONE ORDtRS 
CALL 7i6-586^395u 



■•«v « -* fi*«9ni«i lo»*p* Kb* f#»w*Mi Add J"- ** »»^-pp"<4 
«*t4ii^a<KH ^o p*>«B«m««"»«'1i'0' 0-*<^*0» odtf 1 l'^ COD add 
1? Of il^K w«^«' 1 1 odtffl ^D NV f«.d*ntv «d^ ' ta> 



^5«e U%t o( Afpf^ttsets on t>age r30 



73 Magazine • Novembef. 1982 147 



FACIT 4555 S ERIAL FACE PRINTER 

The Faclt 4555 aiphanumerical serial printer is cotiplete. Equipped with RS232C Interface » 
printing iQechanlsa, control electronics, drive eiectrofilcB, power supply and character genera- 
tor. The adaptation electroolcs can be modified in four versions :Bit*pardl lei data transfer, 
CCITl (ElA, R5232C) for btt-serlal data transfer and the current loop (TTY) interface also for 
bit serial data transfer. The Faclt 4555 prints od ordinary paper and is adjuatable for dif- 
ferent paper widths and formatB, 9.5** paper width with 66 lines per page or DIN A4 with 70 

lines per page* 

SPECIFICATIONS 



Print Epeed 

Print tna mode 

Max. i^ of ch/llne 

Matrix 

Char, Size Height 

Char, Size Width 



up to 60ch,s. 

Incremental. 

aO alt. 132. 

7X5 dot tnatriit. 

2 * Turn/ 1/ a'* 

1.3ra!D/O,05'' I32ch/line 

2.iBiii/0*083" SOch/tine 



Char* spacing 

Char. Coda 
Char* Sec 

Feed aechanistii 



2. 54™]/!/ 10" BOch/line 
1.55mm/0.06" 132ch/line 
ECMA-6 7-blt coded char, get 
63 Char, various national 
versions* 
Sprocket feed* 



THESE UNITS WERE PtTLLED OUT OF SERVICE IS GOOD WORKING CONDITION. WE CHECK EACH UNIT OH A 
RAOIO SHACK TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER. 




PRINTER ONLY 



St29.99 



Printer with llnecord, box of 
paper, inter* connect cable for 
TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTEa, 

$149.99 



GENEVA CALCULATOR WATCH 

This attractive watch has the following modes; 

Komal TjTTie Setting, 

Calendar Settings 

Oaily Alarm Tine Setting, 

Weekly Alarm Time Setting, 

Chronograph, 

Calculator. 




i 



■r 




Featured in Black Plastic 



$24*99 



or Featured in Stainless Steel 



S29.99 



SILICON DlODl^^ 










FtiliD THRU SOLDER RF CAPACTORS 


MR751 




lOOvdc 


6A1DPS 


l0/$5.00 


10Q/$3B.00 


470pf +-20X 




MR510 




lOOOvdc 


3AlDp3 


10/S3.75 


iooy$24.oo 






HEP 1 70 




iOOOvdc 


2Amp3 


20/$ 2. 00 


100/$15.00 


5/$ 1.00 or 100/$ 1 5. 00 or 


IN 3209 




lOOvdc 


1 5Anipa 


$2,00 


10/ SiS.OO 


1000/$ 100. oa 


\ 


BYX2 1/200 




200vdc 


25AiDps 


$2.00 


10/ $15,00 






1N2138A 




600vdc 


frOAmpa 


?5,00 


10/ S40,00 


lOOOpf/.OOlu 


if +-rot 


OS85-04C 




AOOvdc 


SOAmps 


110,00 


10/ sdo.oo 






IN 32 69 




eOOvdc 


160Amps 


$15.00 


10/5120.00 


4/$1.00 or 100/$20.00 or 


27 5Z41 




lOOvdc 


250A]Kps 


S20-00 


10/$ 175. 00 


1000/$! 50. OC 


1 


7-5754 




300vdc 
15KVDC 


40QA3PS 
20ma, 


$30.00 

S3, 00 


10/$250.00 
10/ $20*00 






HCEKIS 


E PROMS 




SHFR20K 




20KVDC 


20ina» 


$4.00 


10/ 530*00 




tN4148 




signal 




30/$KOO 


100/ $3.00 


2708 1024x1 
2716 2048x8 
27L32/2SL32 


$2.00 each 


FAIRCHILD ^ 


a 16 16K DYKAHIC RAMS 200n5. Vurz # 


I6K75 


$4.00 each 


25 Tor ^25, 


00 


or 100 For 


S90.00 or 


1000 For $750,00 


$10,00 each 


HEWLETT PACKARD MICROWAVE 


DIODES 










iH57lI 




(5OB2-280O) 




Schottky 


Barrier Diodes 


$1.00 ot 10 


for $ 8,50 


IN 57 12 




(5082-2810) 




«i 


II ■! 


$1.50 or 10 


for $10.00 


1N6263 




(HSCH-lOOi) 




It 


II 11 


$ .75 or 10 


for $ 5*00 


5082-2835 








II 


If II 


$1.50 or 10 


for 510.00 


5082-2805 




Quad Matched 


« 


per 


set S5,00 or 10 


for S40*00 



i 



Toll Five Number 
80O-52&-0180 
(For orders only) 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



(f\i*^|z elect roiycg 



148 ISMagazine * November J982 



RECALL PHCWE MEMORY TELEPHONE WITH 24 NUMBER AUTQ DIALER 

The Recall Phone TelephoD© enploys Che latest st^te of art 
coTODunlcatiDfis technology , It Is a comb in &t ion telephone 
and automatic dialer that uses premium-quality, soils-state 
circuity to assure high-reliability performance In persoftal 
or business applies t ions. $49.99 




'JL'. ' 



/ 




ARON ALPHA RAPID BONDING GLUE 

Super Glue fCE-466 high strength 
rapid bonding adhesive. Alpha 
Cyanoactylate.Set»Time 20 Co 40 
sec. ,0. Zfl.ojs. {20gm. > 

$2.00 




THOUGH TONE PAD 

This pa^ contains all the electronics to 
produce standard touch-tone tones* New 
with data. 



! 




*i0^fi« 



J*M^ 



$9.99 or 10/g89.99 



MITSUMI (JEF/VHF VARACTQR TL^^ER MODEL UVtiA 

Perfect for those unscrambler projects* 
New with data. 




f I 



Si9.99 or 10/$U9.99 



INTEGRATED CIRCUITS 



MC1372F 

MCl35ap 

MCU50P 

MCn30AlP 

MC1310P 

MC1496P 

LM565N 

LM380N14 

LMie89N 

NE564N 

NE561N 



Color TV Video Modulator Circuit. 

IF AEip. ,LimiCer ,FK Detector ^Audlo Driver , Electronic Attenuator 

IF Amplifier 

Low Level Video Detector 

FM Stereo Demodulator 

Balanced Modulator/Detnodulator 

Phase Locked Loop 

2Watt Audio Power Amplifier 

TV Video Modulator 

Phase Locked Loop 

Phase Locked Loop 



i CO 10 


Hup 


4.42 


$2.95 


5-O0 


4.00 


U30 


1.25 


1.50 


1,15 


4.29 


3.30 


1.50 


1.25 


2*50 


2.00 


1.56 


1.25 


5.00 


4.00 


10.00 


8.00 


i0,00 


8,00 



FEREAKTI ELECraONICS AM RADIO RECEIVER MODEL ZN414 INTERGRATED CIRCUIT. 
Features: 

1,2 Zo 1*6 volt operating range. , Less than O.Sma current consttniption. ISOKHz to 3^0z 
Frequency range. , Easy to assemble, no aligmaent necessary. Effective and variable AGC action.. 
Will drive an earphcme direct. Excellent audio quality. , Typical power gain of 72dB. ,T0-1S 
package. With data. $2,99 or 10 For i24.99 



NX CAD RECH-^GEABLE BATTERIES 

AA Battery Pack of 6 These ate Factory 
New* S5*O0 

SUB C Pack of 10 2.3Ainp/Hr* $10.00 

Gates Rechargesble Battery Packs 



I2vdc at 2.5Aii)p/Hr. 
12vdc at SAmp/Hr* 



$IK99 
515*99 



VHF DOPLEXERS 

This dup lexer was made for EF Harris Mobile Phones, 
These duplexers can be used in any mobile phone 
system^ along with having the capabilities to be 
modified for UH? use. Dimensions are 3 3/5"Lx 4 2/5" 
Wx i I/1Q"D, App. weight is ISoz. /lib, 2o£* 





(^^^^z ele€troi|ic§ 



PRICE S74.99 

Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



73 Magazine • November; 19S2 149 



RF TRANSISTORS, MICROWAVE DIODES 



PART 



It RLdEi 



PART 



PRICE 



PART 



PRICE 



1S2199 


$ 7.50 


2N6083 


$ 


13.25 


CA2612 (TRW) 


$ 25.00 


1S2200 


7.50 


2N6084 




15.00 


CA2674 (TRW) 


25.00 


2N 1 56 1 


25.00 


2N6094 /M9622 


11.00 


CA288l-l(TRW) 


25.00 


2N1362 


25.00 


2N6095 /M9623 


12.00 


CA4101 (TEW) 


25.00 


2N2857 


1.55 


2N6096 /M9624 


15.50 


CA4201 (TRW) 


25.00 


2N2857JAN 


2.55 


2N6097 




17.25 


CA4600 (TRW) 


25.00 


2N2376 


11.00 


2S6136 




21.85 


CD 1889 


20.00 


2N2947 


18.35 


2N6166 




40.25 


CD2545 


20.00 


2N2948 


15.50 


2N6201 




50.00 


CMD514AB 


20.00 


2N2949 


3.90 


2N6459 




18.00 


D4959 


10.00 


2N2950 


4.60 


2N6603 




12.00 


D4987M 


20.00 


2N3375 


8.00 


2N6680 




80.00 


D5i47D 


10,00 


2N3553 


1.57 


2SC756A 




7.50 


D5506 


10.00 


2N3632 


13.80 


2SC781 




2.80 


D5827AM 


20.00 


2N38ia 


5.00 


2SC1018 




1.00 


DMJ36022 


30.00 


2N3866 


1.30 


2SC1042 




12.00 


DMS-2A-2 50 


40.00 


2N3924 


3.35 


2SC1070 




2.50 


HEP76 


4.95 


2N3927 


17.75 


2SC1239 




2.50 


HEPS 3002 


11.30 


2N3950 


25.00 


2SC1251 




12.00 


HEPS3003 


30.00 


2N4072 


1.80 


2SC1306 




2.90 


HEPS 3005 


10.00 


2N4t27 


2 1 . 00 


2SC1307 




5.50 


HEPS 3006 


19.90 


2N4427 


1.30 


2SC1760 




1.50 


HEPS 3007 


25.00 


2N4428 


1.85 


2SC1970 




2.50 


HEPS 30 10 


11.34 


2N4957 


3.45 


2SC2166 




5.50 


HTEF2204 H.P. 


112.00 


2N4958 


2.90 


8B1087 


(M.A.) 


25.00 


5082-0112 H.P. 


14.20 


2N49S9 


2.30 


A50-12 




20. 00 


5082-0253 H.P. 


105.00 


2N5090 


13.90 


A283B 




5,00 


5082-0320 H.P. 


58.00 


2N5108 


4.00 


AT ,D 4 2 DON (AVANTEK) 


395.00 


5082-0386 H.P. 


FOR 


2N5109 


1.70 


AM123 




97,35 


5082-0401 H.P, 


FOR 


2N5160 


3.45 


AM688 




100.00 


5082-0438 H.P, 


POR 


2N5177 


21.62 


BB105B 




,52 


5082-1028 H.P. 


POR 


2N5179 


1.00 


BD4/4JFBD4 (G.E.) 


10.00 


5082-2711 H.P. 


23.15 


2N5583 


4.00 


BFQ85 




1.50 


5082-3080 H.P. 


2.00 


2N5589 


8.65 


BFR90 




1,30 


5082-3188 H.P. 


1.00 


2N5590 


10.35 


BFR91 




1.65 


5082-6459 H.P. 


POR 


2N5591 


13.80 


BKW92 




1.50 


5082-8323 H.P. 


POR 


2N5635 


10.95 


BFX89 




1.00 


35826E H.P. 


POR 


2N5637 


15.50 


BFY90 




1.00 


35831E H.P. 


29.99 


2N5641 


9.20 


BGY54 




25.00 


35853E H.P. 


71.50 


2N5642 


10.95 


BGY55 




25.00 


35854E H.P- 


75.00 


2N5643 


15.50 


BGY74 




25.00 


HPA024I H.P. 


75.60 


2N5645 


13.80 


BGY75 




25.00 


HXTR3101 H.P. 


7.00 


2N3646 


20.70 


BL161 




10,00 


HXTR3102 H.P. 


8.75 


2N5691 


18. 00 


BLX67 




11.00 


HXTR6101/2N6617 


H.P. 55. 00 


2N5764 


27.00 


BLY568CF 


25.00 


HXTR6I04 H.P. 


68.00 


2N5836 


5.45 


SLY 87 




13.00 


HXTR6105 H.P. 


31.00 


2N5842 


8.00 


BLYSa 




14.00 


HXTK6106 H.P. 


33,00 


2N5849 


20.00 


BLY89 




15.00 


qSCH1995 H.P. 


POR 


2N5913 


3.25 


BLY90 




20. 00 


JO 2000 TRW 


10.00 


2N5922 


10. 00 


BLY351 




10.00 


JO2001 TRW 


25.00 


2N5923 


25.00 


C4005 




20. 00 


J04045 TRU 


25.00 


2N5941 


23.00 


CA402 


(TRW) 


25.00 


K3A 


10.00 


2N5942 


40.00 


CA405 


(TRW) 


25.00 


MA450A 


10.00 


2N5944 


9.20 


CA6I2B 


(TRW) 


25.00 


MA41487 


POR 


2N5945 


11.50 


CA2100 


(TRW) 


25.00 


MA4I765 


POR 


2N5946 


19.00 


CA2113 


(TRW) 


25.00 


MA43589 


POR 


2N6080 


9.20 


CA2200 


(TRW) 


25.00 


MA43636 


POR 


2N6081 


10.35 


CA2213 


(TRW) 


25.00 


MA47044 


POR 


2N6082 


11.50 


CA2418 


(TRW) 


25.00 


MA47651 


25.50 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 
(For orders onfy) 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 

J\f ^^I^ elect roi|ics 




k 



150 73 Magazine • November^ 1982 



GaAs, TUNNEL DIODES, ETC. 



PART 



PRICE 



rr 



PART 



PRICE 



PART 



PRICE 



MA47100 


$ 3.05 


MRF503 


$ 6.00 


PT4186B 


$ POR 


MA47202 


30.80 


MRF504 


7-00 


PT4209 


POR 


MA47771 


POR 


MRF509 


5.00 


PT4209C 


FOR 


MA47852 


POR 


MRF511 


8.65 


PT4566 


FOR 


MA49558 


POR 


MRF605 


20,00 


PT4570 


POR 


MB4021 


POR 


MRF629 


147 


PT4571 


POR 


MBDIOI 


1.00 


MRF644 


23-00 


PT4571A 


POR 


HD05i3 


BOR 


MKF816 


1 5 . 00 


PT4577 


POR 


HHW1171 


42-50 


MRF823 


20, 00 


PT4590 


POR 


MHW1182 


48-60 


MRF901 


3 - 00 


FT4612 


POR 


MHW4i7i 


49-35 


MRF8004 


2.10 


PT4628 


POR 


HHW4172 


51,90 


MS261F 


POR 


FT4640 


POR 


MHW4342 


68.75 


MT4150 Fair- 


POR 


PT4642 


POR 


MLP102 


25.00 


MT5126 Fair- 


POR 


PT5632 


FOR 


MM1500 


32,32 


MT54S1 Fair. 


POR 


PT5749 


POR 


MM1550 


POR 


MT5482 Fair* 


POR 


PT6612 


POR 


MM1552 


50.00 


MT5483 Fair. 


POR 


PT6626 


FOR 


MM1553 


50.00 


MT5596 Fair. 


POR 


PT6709 


POR 


MM1614 


10.00 


MT5764 Fair. 


POR 


PT6720 


POR 


MM2608 


5.00 


MT8762 Fair. 


POR 


PT8510 


POR 


MM3375A 


11-50 


MV109 


.77 


PT8524 


FOR 


MM4429 


10.00 


MV140I 


8.75 


PT8609 


POR 


MM8000 


1.L3 


MV1624 


1.42 


PT8633 


POR 


MMS006 


2 . 30 


MV1805 


15-00 


PT8639 


POR 


M0277L 


POR 


MV1808 


10.00 


PT8659 


POR 


K0283L 


POR 


MV18i7B 


10.00 


PT8679 


POR 


M03757 


POR 


MV1863B 


10.00 


PT8708 


POR 


MP102 


POR 


MV1864A 


10.00 


PT8709 


POR 


MPN3202 


10-00 


MV1864B 


10-00 


PT8727 


POR 


MPR3401 


.52 


MV1S64D 


10.00 


PT8731 


POR 


MPN3412 


1.00 


MV1868D 


10.00 


PT8742 


POR 


HPSU31 


1,01 


MV2101 


.90 


PT8787 


POR 


MRA2023-K5 TRW 


42.50 


MV2111 


,90 


PT9790 


41.70 


MRF2 12/208 


16.10 


MV2 1 1 5 


1.55 


PT31962 


POR 


MRF223 


13.25 


MV2201 


.53 


PT31963 


POR 


MRF224 


15-50 


MV2203 


.53 


PT31983 


POR 


MRF237 


3.15 


MV2209 


2.00 


PTX6680 


POR 


MRF238 


12-65 


MV2215 


2.00 


RAY- 3 


24,99 


MRF243 


25.00 


MWAliO 


7.45 


40081 


POR 


MRF245 


34-50 


MWA120 


7-80 


40281 


POR 


MRF247 


34.50 


MWA130 


8.25 


40282 


POR 


MRF304 


43-45 


MWA210 


7.80 


40290 


POR 


MRF315 


23.00 


MWA220 


8.23 


RFllO 


25.00 


MRF420 


20-00 


MWA230 


8, 65 


SCA3522 


POR 


MRF42i 


36.80 


MWA310 


8-25 


SCA3523 


POR 


MRF422 


41.40 


MWA320 


8.65 


SD1065 


POR 


MRF427 


16.10 


MWA330 


9.50 


SS43 


POR 


MRF428 


46-00 


NEC57835 


5.30 


TP1014 


POR 


MRF450/A 


13.80 


ON 382 


5.00 


TP1028 


POR 


MRF453/A 


17.25 


PPT515-20"3 


POR 


TRW- 3 


POR 


MRF454/A 


19-90 


PRT8637 


POR 


UTO504 Avantek 


70.00 


HRF455/A 


16.00 


PSCQ2-160 


POR 


0TO511 Avantek 


75.00 


KRF458 


19-90 


PT3190 


POR 


V13 


4.00 


t^F463 


25,00 


PX3194 


POR 


V33B 


4.00 


MRF472 


1.00 


PT3195 


FOR 


VIOOB 


4.00 


MRF475 


2-90 


PT3537 


POR 


VAB801EC 


25-00 


MRF477 


1 1 . 50 


PT4166E 


POR 


VAB804EC 


25.00 


MRF502 


1.04 


PT4176D 


POR 


VAS21AN20 


25.00 



Toll Free Number 

800-528-01 BO 
(For orders only) 



JVf <7^ electrof|ic$ 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



73 Magazine • November, 1982 151 



COAXIM. 



AY SWITCHES SFDT 



Eleccrotjlc Specialty Co. /Raven Elecironlcs 
Part f 25N28 Part # SU-01 

26Vdc Type fl Cannectcir, DC to I GHx, 



FSN 5985-556-9681 



S49.00 






NC 



COM 



NO 



4 5*t£ 5 5* iJO^J 
• WO 

f4 2#1 -^t ffsf iU 10* 



SA ^ 



I 



Ampbenoi 

Part # 316-10102-S 

U5Vac Type BNC DC to 3 GUs, 



$29. 9§ 



rxR 

Part ^ 300-11182 

l20Vac Type BNC DC to 4 GHz, 

FSN 59 B 5- 54 3- 1225 

$39.99 



FXR 

P^rt // 300-11173 
UOVac Type BNC Same 
FSN 5985-543-^1850 

$39.99 






^C To Banana Plug Coax Cable RG-58 36 Inch or BNC to N Co*iX Cable RC-58 36 Inch* 



?7.99 or 2 For $13.99 or 10 For S5Q,00 



S8.99 or 2 For S15-99 or 10 For $60.00 





SOLID STATE RE1-AVS 



P&E Hod el ECT1DB72 
PRICI-: EACH $5.0€ 



5vdc turn on 



3vdc turn on 



120vac concact at 7a(sp& or 20aiiips on a 

10" X I0"x * 124 alumLnuai. Heatsiiik with 
silicon grease. 

240t;3c contact l^amps or 40aiiips on a 
XO"x I0*'x .124 altimlniuD^ Heatsink with 
silicon grease. 

240vac contact at 1 5^mps or 40amps on a 
lO'^K lO'^x .124 slumnum* He^tsink with 
silicon grease* 

NOTE: *^T^ I terns may be subatltuted with other brands or equivQleot model numbers. ^** 



Diglslg, Inc, Model ECS-215 
PRICE EACH $7,50 

Grig^by/Barton Model Ga7400 
PRICE EACH $7.50 



5vdc turn on 



oM^ 



electroiyci) 



Toll Fre« Numbar 
800-520-0180 
(For ord«r8 only) 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



152 73 Magazine • November, 1982 



"MIXERS" 



WATKINS JOHNSON WJ-M6 Double Balanced Mixer 



LO and RF 0.2 to 300MHz 
Conversion Loss (SSB) 

Noise Figure (SSB) 

Conversion Compression 



IF DC to 300MHz 

6. 5dB Max. 1 to 50MHz 

8.5dB Max. ,2 to 300MHz 

same as above 

8.5dB Max, 50 to 300MH2 

.3dB Typ. 



$21,00 



WITH DATA SHEET 



NEC (NIPPON ELECTRIC CO. LTD. NE57835/25C2150 Microwave Transistor 



NF Min F=2GHz 
F=3GHz 

F=4GHz 



dS 2.4 Typ. 
dB 3.4 Typ. 
dB 4.3 Typ. 



Ft Gain Bandwidth Product at Vce=8v, Ic=IOnia. 
Vcbo 25v Vceo llv Vebo 3v Ic 



MAG F=2GH2 
F=3GHz 
F=4GH z 

4 Min. 
50ma. Pt. 



dB 12 Typ. 
dB 9 Typ. 
dB 6.5 Typ 

6 Typ. 
250niw 



S5.30 



UNELCO RF Power and Linear Amplifier Capacitors 

These are the famous capacitors used by all the RF Power and Linear Amplifier 
manufacturers, and described in the RF Data Book. 



5pf 

5.1pf 

6.8pf 

7pf 

8,2pf 



lOpf 
12pf 
I3pf 
l^f 
15pf 



18pf 

22pf 
25pf 
27pf 
27.5pf 



30pf 
32pf 
33pf 
34pf 
AOpf 



43pf 
51pf 
60pf 
80pf 
82pf 



lOOpf 
llOpf 

120pf 
130pf 
140pf 



200pf 1 
220pf 11 
470p£ 51 
5Q0pf 

lonbpf 



to lOpcs . 
to 50pcs. 
up pes. 



$1.00 ea 
$ .90 ea 
$ .80 ea 



NIPPON ELECTRIC COMPANY TUNNEL DIODES 



Peak Pt. Current ma. 

Valley Pt. Current ma. 

Peak Pt. Voltage mv. 

Projected Peak Pt. Voltage mv. 

Series Res. Ohms 

Terminal Cap. pf. 

Valley Pt. Voltage mv. 



Ip 
Iv 

Vp 

Vpp Vf 

rS 

Ct 

VV 



MODEL IS2199 
9inin. lOTyp. Umax. 
1.2Typ. 1.5max. 
95Typ. 120max. 
=Ip 480min. 550Typ. 630max 
2.5Typ. 4max. 
I.7Typ. 2max. 
370Typ. 



1S2200 $7.50 
9min. lOTyp. Umax. 
1.2Typ. l.Bmax. 
75Typ. 90max. 
440min. 520Typ. 600max 
2Typ. Smax. 
5Typ. Smax. 
350Typ. 



FAIRCHILD / DUMONT Oscilloscope Probes Model 4290B 

Input Impedance 10 meg., Input Capacity 6.5 to 12pf., Division Ration (Volts/Div Factor) 

10:1, Cable Length 4Ft. , Frequency Range Over lOOMHz. 

These Probes will work on all Tektronix, Hewlett Packard, and other Oscilloscopes. 

PRICE $45.00 



MOTOROLA RF DATA BOOK 

List all Motorola RF Transistors / RF Power Amplifiers, Varactor Diodes and much much 
more. 



PRICE $7.50 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



^^[x electroi|ics 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



73Magazfne ■ November. 1965 153 



"SOCKETS AND CHIMNEYS" 



EimC TUBE SOCKETS AND CHIMNEYS 



SKUO 

SKIOOA 

SK400 

SK406 

SK416 

SK500 

SK600 

SK602 

SK606 

SK607 

SK610 

SK620 

SK62 6 

SKfj30 

SK636B 

SK6A0 

SK646 

SK700 

SK7n.A 

SK740 

SK770 

SKSOOA 

SKS06 

SKSIO 

SK900 

SK906 

SR142Q 

SKU90 



Socket 

Socket For 4CX5000A,R, J, 4CX10,OOOD, 4CX15,OOOA,J 

Socket For 4'-125A,2 50A,400A, 4OOC,4PRi25A,40OA,4-500A, 5-500A 

Chimney For 4"25OA,4O0A, 40OC,4PR400A 

Chimney For 3-4 OOZ 

Socket For 4-i00OA/4PRIO00A/B 

Socket For 4CX2,50B,BC,FC,Rj4CX350A,F/FJ 

Socket For 4CX250B,BC,FG,R,4CX350A,F,FJ 

Chimney For 4CX250B,BC,FG,R,4CX350A,F,FJ 

Socket For 4CX600J,JA 

Socket For 4CX600J,JA 

Socket For 4CX600J,JA 

Chimney For 4CX600J,JA 

Socket For 4CX600J , JA 

Chimney For 4CX600J,JA 

Socket For 4CX600J»JA 

Chimney For 4CX60OJ,JA 

Socket' For 4CX300A,Y, 4CX125C,F 

Socket For 4CX30aA,Y,4CXl25G,F 

Socket For 4CX300A,Y,4CX125C,F 

Socket For 4CX300A,Y ,4CX125C;F 

Socket For 4CX1000A,4CX1 500B 

Chimney For 4CXiO00A,4CXl5QOB 

Socket For 4CX1000A,4CX1500B 

Socket For 4X500A 

Chimney For 4X500A 

Socket For 5CX3O0OA 

Socket For 4CV8000A 



3P0R 

$520.00 

260.00 

74,00 

36.00 

390.00 

51-00 

73.00 

11.00 

60,00 

60.00 

66.00 

10.00 

.66,00 

34.00 

36.00 

71.00 

225.00 

225,00 

86,00 

86.00 

225.00 

40.00 

225,00 

300.00 

37.00 

650 . 00 

585.00 



JOHNSON TUBE SOCKETS .^D CHI^£NEYS 



124-1 11/SR606 
122-027 5-001 
124^0113-00 
U4-116/SK630A 
124-115-2/SK620A 



Chimney For 4CX250B,BG,FG,R, 4CX350A,F,FJ 

Socket For 3-50OZ, 4-125A, 250A, 400A, .4-500A, 5-500A 

Capacitor Ring 

Socket For 4CX250B ,BC,FG,R, /4CX350A,F,FJ 

Socket For 4CX250B ,BC,FG,R, /4CX350A,F,FJ 

813 Tube Socket 



S 10 
(pair) 15 

15 
55 

55 
20 



00 
00 

00 
00 
00 
00 



CHIP CAPACITORS 

.8pf 

Ipf 

l.lpf 

l,4pf 

1.5pf 

l.Spf 

2.2pf 

2Jpf 

3.3pf 

3, 6pf 

3.9pf 

4.7pf 

5,6pf 

6.8pf 

B.Zpf 



PRICES 



I to 10 - 

II to 50 ■ 
51 to 100 



lOpf 
12pf 
15pf 
18pf 
£0pf 
22pf 
£4pf 
Z7pf 
33pf 
39pf 
47pf 
51pf 
56pf 
6Spf 
82pf 

.99i 

.mi 



lOOpf* 
llOpf 

12Dpf 

130pf 

I50pf 

leOpf 

ISOpf 

200pf 

Z20pf* 

240pf 

270pf 

300pf 

330pf 

360pf 

390pf 



TUBE CAPS (Plate) 


$11.00 


HRi, 4 


HR2,3, 6 £ 7 


13,00 


MR5y 8 


14.00 


HR9 


17.00 


HRIO 


20,00 



430pf 

470pf 

5lOpf 

560pf 

620pf 

680pf 

820pf 

lOOOpf/.OOXuf* 

ISOOpf/.OOlSuf 

Z70Opf/.0O27uf 

I0,000pf/.01uf 

12,00Qpfy.012uf 

15,000pf/.015uf 

18,00Opf/.01Byf 



101 to 1000 ,60(f 
1001 ^ UP .2St 



IS A SPECIAL PRICE: 10 for $7.50 

100 for $65,00 
1000 for $350.00 



WATKINS OOHKSON NJ-V9Q7: Voltage Controlled Micro^^ave Oscillator 



$110.00 



Frequency range 3.6 to 4.2GHz, Power ouput, Hin. lOdBm typical ^ adBm Guaranteed. 
Spurious output suppression Harfnonic (nfo)t ^^^^ 20d8 typical, Irr-Band Nort- Harmonic, min. 
60dB typical. Residual FM, pk to pk, Max. 5KHz, pushing factor. Max. 8KHz/V, Pulling figure 
(1.5rl VSWR), Max. 6QHHz, Tuning voltage range +1 to +15voltSs Tuning current. Max. -0.1mA, 
modulation sensitivity range, Max. 120 to 30HH2/V, Input capacitance. Max. TOOpf, Oscillator 
Bias +15 +-0.05 volts @ 55mA, Max. 

Toll Free Number 
800-528-01 80 
(For orders only) 



(f\l^l|z elect roi|ic$ 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



154 73 Magazine • November, 1982 



TUBES 



TYPE 



PRICE 



TYPE 



PRICE 



TYPE 



2E26 


$ 5.69 


KT88 


2K28 


100.00 


DX362 


2X1000A 


300.00 


DX415 


3B22 


19.75 


572B/T160L 


3B28/866A 


7.50 


592/3-200A3 


3-500Z 


102.00 


807 


3-lOOOZ 


400.00 


811 


3CX1000A/8283 


428.00 


SUA 


3CX1500A7/887 


533.00 


812a 


3X2 500A3 


200.00 


813 


3CX3000A7 


490. 00 


829B 


4-65A/8165 


45.00 


832A 


4-125A/4D21 


58. 00 


4624 


'!(-250A/5D22 


75.00 


4662 


4-400A/8432 


90.00 


4665 


4-400C/6775 


95.00 


5675/A 


4-1000A/8166 


300.00 


5721 


4B32 


22 . 00 


5768 


4E27A/5-125B 


155.00 


5836 


4CS250R 


146.00 


5837 


4X150A/7034 


30.00 


5861/EC55 


4X150D/7035 


40.00 


587 6A 


4X150G/8172 


100.00 


5881/6L6W 


4X2 SOB 


30.00 


5893 


4CX250B/7203 


45.00 


589 4 /A 


4CX250F/G/8621 


55.00 


5894 /B 


4CX250K/8245 


100.00 


5946 


4CX250R/7580W 


69.00 


6080 


4CX300A/8167 


140.00 


6083/AX9909 


4CX350A/8321 


83.00 


6098/6AK6 


4CX350F/J/8904 


95.00 


6115/A 


4X5 OOA 


282.00 


6146 


4CX6O0J/88O9 


607.00 


6146A 


4CW800F 


625.00 


6146B/8298A 


4CX1000A/8168 


340.00 


6146W 


4CX1500B/8660 


397.00 


6156 


4CX5000A/8170 


932 . 00 


6159 


4CX10000D/8171 


990. 00 


6161 


4CX15000A/828I 


1260.00 


6291 


4FR60A 


100.00 


6293 


4PR60B/8252 


175.00 


6360 


4PR400A/8188 


192.00 


6524 


5CXi500A 


569 . 00 


6550 


6BKAC 


6.00 


6JM6 


6DQ5 


5.00 


6JN6 


6FW5 


6.00 


6JS6B 


6GE5 


6.00 


6KG6/EL505 


6GJ5 


6.00 


6KM6 


6HSS 


6.00 


6KN6 


6JB5/6HE5 


6.00 


6LF6 


6JB6A 


6.00 


6LQ6 (GE) 



PRICE 



NOTICE ALL PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 
TUBES MAY EITHER BE NEW OR SURPLUS CONDITION !!!!!!!!! 



20.00 


6562/6974A 


$ 50.00 


50.00 


6832 


22.00 


50.00 


6883/8032A/8552 


7.00 


49.00 


6897 


110-00 


144.00 


6907A 


75,00 


7.50 


6939 


15.00 


10.00 


7094 


125.00 


15.00 


7117 


17.00 


35.00 


7211 


60.00 


50.00 


7289/3CX100A5 


34.00 


38.00 


7360 


11.00 


28.00 


7377 


67.00 


310.00 


7408 


4.00 


80.00 


7650 


250.00 


585.00 


7695 


8.00 


25.00 


7843 


58.00 


200.00 


7854 


83.00 


85.00 


7868 


5.00 


100.00 


7894 


12.00 


100.00 


8072 


65.00 


110.00 


8117A 


130.00 


25.00 


8121 


60.00 


6.00 


8122 


100.00 


45.00 


8236 


30.00 


50.00 


8295/PL172 


506.00 


60.00 


8462 


100.00 


258.00 


8505A 


73.50 


10.00 


8533W 


92.00 


89.00 


8560/A 


65.00 


14.00 


8560AS 


90.00 


110.00 


8608 


34.00 


7.00 


8637 


38.00 


7.50 


8643 


100.00 


8.50 


8647 


123.00 


14.00 


8737/5894B 


60.00 


66.00 


8873 


260.00 


15.00 


8874 


260.00 


233.00 


8875 


260. 00 


125.00 


8877 


533.00 


12.00 


8908 


12.00 


5.00 


8930/651Z 


71.00 


53.00 


8950 


12.00 


10.00 






6.00 


6LQ6 (Sylvania) 


7.50 


6, 


.00 


6LU8 


6.00 


6. 


.00 


6LX6 


6.00 


6, 


,00 


6ME6 


6.00 


6, 


.00 


1 2BY7A 


4.00 


6, 


,00 


12JB6A 


6.00 


6. 


,00 


6KD6 


6.00 


6, 


,00 


6JT6A 


6.00 




6KD6 


6.00 


II!II1I!!I! 


M t F t r t f 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 


tiiiinn! 


! ! ! 


1 1 M ' ! ! 1 1 


r r 1 r M M ! 1 I 1 ! r M I r 


If!!!!!!!! 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



(^^^I|z elect roi|ic§ 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



TSMagazine • November, 1982 155 




"TVRO BOARD LIST' 



5 



70 HHZ TF BOARD : This circuit provides about 43dB gain with 50 ohra ijiput and output iiripedance. 
It is desiEneid to 4rlve tlhe DeTnodulator, The on-board bypass- filter can be tuned to band- 
widths betveen 20 a.ud 35 ^Qiz with a passband ripple of less than h dB. Hybrid IC's are used 
for the gain stages. 

SINGLE AUDIO BOABp : This circuit recovers the audio signals from the 6.8 MHe frequency. The 
Hiller 905L coils are tuned to pass the 6^3MHz subcarrier and the 9052 coil tunes for recovery 
of the audio, 

DUAL AUBIO BOARD I Duplicate of the single audio but Also eoi/ers the 6,2 range. 

be CONTROL BOARD : Ko deseriptlon. 



OOAL AUDIO BOARD 



Pr: 


Lnted Circuit Board 


2 


Ipf Sin 


2 


12pf sm 


2 


50pf sm 


2 


6Bpf sm 


4 


9lpf STB 


5 


.OOlmfd 


6 


-Olnifd 


2 


,047nifd 


1 


,47nifd 25vde 


2 


Lmfd lOvdc 


4 


4.7iiifd 35vdc 


1 


470mfd 25vdc 


2 


220K i/Aw 


2 


150iC l/4w 


2 


6>&K l/4w 


2 


3.3K i/4w 


2 


2.2K iy4tf 


4 


IK l/4w 


2 


10 ohm i/4w 


2 


50K pot? 


I 


5K pot 


2 


CA3065 


1 


LM3S0 


I 


7S12 Voltage Reg. 


5 


2tf2222 


h 


Miller 9051 


I 


Miller 9052 


TOTAL KIT PRICE 


DC 


CONTROL BOARD 


Printed Circuit Board 


2 


470nifd 2 5vdG 


2 


4.7nifd 25vdc 


1 


Imeg l/4w 



$ 



FRICE EACH 

25.00 
1 . 00 
LOO 
UOO 
1.00 
1,00 

^M 

35 

.35 

.35 

.59 

.59 
1.29 

.15 

.15 

.15 

.15 

. 15 

. 15 

*15 
1.00 
1.00 
2.16 
1.5& 
1,17 

.50 
5.99 
5,99 

97.62 



3 I OK l/4w 

1 3.3K l/4itf 

3 2.2K l/4w 

1 IK l/4w 

2 5K 10 turn triitipoc 

4 lOK 10 turn trlntpot 

1 lOK 10 turn with dial 

1 7815 V&lta^e Reg. 

I LH324 

1 5 pole rotary switch 

1 SPDT switch 

1 DPDT swlch 

1 O^lma En<?ter 

1 18 to 24vdc at 1 amp 
pover supply 

TOTAL KIT PRICE 



.15 
. 15 
»15 

.15 
L.OO 
I. 00 
10,00 
1.17 
2.50 
2,50 

i;oo 

1 .00 

5 . 00 

24,99 

74.27 



15.00 
K29 

.15 



DEMODULATOR lOARD 

Printed Circuit Board 

1 tmfd 35vdc 

12 .Olmfd 50vdc disc 

^1 4?0mfd 25vdc 

1 lOOrafd I6vdc 

2 22nifd 35vdc 

3 4. l-mU 35vdc 
1 4300pf sin 

1 330pf sm 

1 lOOpf sm 

1 91pf Sin 

2 3pf Stn 

1 2 to 8pf ceramic trimraer 

1 lOOuh choke 

1 4.7u.b choke 

1 2,7uh choke 



PRICE EACH 

? 40.00 

.59 

,35 

L,29 

.69 

2 . 00 
I. 00 
1. 00 
1.00 
1 , 00 
1.00 
1,50 
1*50 
U50 



4 lOOK l/4w 

1 51 ohm I /Aw 

1 27K l/4w 

5 iOK l/4w 

1 B.2K l/4w 

2 4.7K l/4w 
1 2.2K l/4w 
i 1.2K I/4w 

3 IK l/4w 

3 560 ohiti l/4w 

I 470 ohm l/4w 

1 390 ohm l/4w 

1 300 ohin l/4w 

1 270 ohxfi l/4w 

1 150 ohm l/4w 

1 41 ohm I /4w 

1 lOK pot 

1 NE592/LM733N 

1 NE564 

1 MWAI20 CMotorolfi) 

1 7812 Voltage Reg, 

1 7815 Voltage Reg. 

3 2M2222 

1 1S34/38 

1 HP5082-2800 

1 5 to 7 volt Zsnner 

TOTAL KIT PRICE 



.15 
.15 
,15 

.15 

,15 

,15 

.15 

.15 

.15 

. 15 

.15 

,15 

,15 

.15 

.15 

.15 

1*00 

2.50 

5.00 

7, BO 

1.17 

1.17 

.50 

.50 

2.20 

1.00 

92.25 



COMPLETE KIT WITH DUAL AUDIO $923.23 

COMPLliTE KIT WITH SIMGLE AUDIO 880.77 

LESS 101 ON ALL COMFLETE KIT ORDERS 

BOARDS AHD PARTS MAY HE PURCHASED SEPERATELY 

AT THE FKI.CES LISTED ABOVE. 

ALL PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANCE WITH OUT 
NOTICE I M f n ! ! M n 1 i 1 1 I M ! n I ! ! n 11 1 n I I 



TVRO BOARD DESCRIPTION A«D PARTE LIST 

DUAL CONVERSION BOARD : This board provides conversion from the 3.7-4,21 band first to 900 MHz 
where gain and bandpass filtering are provided and, second > to 70 MHz. The board contains 
both local DSC ilia tors J one fixed and Che other variable, and the second mlKer, ConF^truction 

is greatly simplified by the uE5e of Hybrid IC amplifiers for the gain stages. 

DEMODULATOR BOARD : This circuit tskes the 70 fflJs center frequency satellite TV signal in the 
JO Co 200 millivolt range » detects them using a phase lock loop, de-emphasizes and filters the 
result to produce standard NTSC video. Other outputs include the audio subcarrler, a DC voltage 
proportional to the strength of the 70 MH? signal ^ and AFC voltage centered at about 2 volts DC 



DUAL CONVERSION BOARD 

Printed Circuit Board 
6 47pf chip caps 
2 4.7ttifd 35vdc 

2 ,Olmfd 50vdc disc 

4 1.5 to 8pf piston 

ttiramer cap 

1 470 ohm I/4w 

2 HWA320 (Motorola) 

1 7815 Voltage Reg* 

1 VTOB090 

1 VTOB240 

2 IN4005 

1 DBM500/110q (Varll) 
1 MLP102 (Engleman) 
a SMA Male Connector 

TOTAL KIT PRICE 



70 MH2 IF BOARD 
Printed CircuiL Board 

Toll Free Number 
800-528-0100 
(For orders only) 



cap 



PRICE EACH 


3 


MWA120 


7,80 






.047infd 


$ 25.00 

1,00 

.59 

.35 


7 


.Olmfd 50vdc 


.35 






.47mfd 


2 


4.7nil;d ■J5vdE: 


.59 






Imfd lOvdc 


1 


lOpC sra 


1 . OO 






4.7mfd 35vdc 


5 


22pr sm 


1.00 






470[nfd 2 5vdc 


1 


ISpf sm 


1.00 






Z20K l/4w 


5.99 
.15 


1 


33pf sm 


1.00 






150K l/4w 


2 


330 ohm l/4w 


.15 






6.8K IMw 


5 


■J.W. Miller A500-4 


4,99 






3,3K l/4w 


8. 65 


1 


7815 Voltage Reg. 


1.17 






2.2K l/4w 


1. 17 












IK l/4tf 


150.00 
156.25 


TOTAL KIT PRICE 


86.45 






10 ohm l/4w 












50K pot 


.39 


SINGLE AUDIO BOARD 


PRICE EACH 




5K pot 


125.00 












CA3065/MC13581^ 


25.00 


Pr 


in ted Circuit Board 


S 15 


,00 




^LH3tJ0 


5.00 


1 


3pf sm 




.00 




7812 Voltage Reg 


572.64 


1 
\ 


12pf sm 
50pf sm 




.00 

.00 


2 


ZN2222 
Miller 9051 




1 


68pf sm 




,00 


1 


Miller 9052 




2 


9 1 p f s ni 


_L 


.00 








3 


.001 raid 




.35 


TOTAL KIT PRICE 


25,00 


3 


.Olmfd 




.35 








.35 

.35 

.59 

.59 

K29 

*15 

.15 

.15 

.15 

. 15 

,15 

.15 

1.00 

1,00 

2.16 

1.56 

1.17 

,50 

5.99 

5,99 

55.16 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



(^^^i|z elect roi|ic§ 



156 73 Magazine • November, 1982 



I 



"CHIPS" 



FAIRCHILD 

95 H 90 DC 
95H91DC 
11C90DC 
11C91DC 
11C06DC 
n COS DC 

11C01FC 

a2S90 



11C240C 



11C44DC 



VNF AND UHFf»ftESCALER CHIPS 

350MC Pfsscaief Oivfde by lOni 

350MC Prescaier divide by 5/6 

650MC Prescaier divide by TOM 1 

S50MC Prtscafer d ivide by 5^ 

UHf Prescaier 750MC DType Flip Flop 

lOHz Counter Divide by 4 

(Regular price S7S.00} 

High Speed Dua»5/4 irtput NO/NOR Gate 

Presenabie High Speech Decade/Bmary 

Counter used w^ith the nC90/9i or trie 

95H90/91 Prescaier can divide by 100. 

(Signedcs) 

This chip IS the same as a Motorola 

MC4024/4324 Dua» TTl VoUage Cor>lrol 

Muflivibrator 

This chrp It the same as a Motorola 

MC4044/4344 Phase Frequency Detector. 



PRICE 


HEWLETT PACKARD 






$ 6.50 


MIXERS MODELS 


105 14 A 


10514B 


S.50 


Frequency Range 


2MH2to5O0MC 


ZMH2 to 


1S.50 






500MC 


1S.S0 


Inpul/Oulput Frequency L & R 


200KHZ to 


200KHZ to 


12.30 




&QOMC 


500MC 




X 


DC lo 500MC 


DC to 500MC 


50.00 


Mijcer Conversion Loss (A) 


?dB 


7dB 


15.40 


(B» 


9dB 


9dB 




Noise Pertormance (SSBj fA) 


7d& 


7da 




(B) 


9dB 


MB 




PRICE 


$49.99 PRICE 


$39 99 



5.00 
3/37 



GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. QUNN DIODE MODEL Y-2167 
Freq Gap {Gh2) 12 lo ia. Outpul (Mm ) vOOmW. Duty (%» 
CW, Typ. Bms (Vdc) 8.0, Type. Oper fMAdC) 550. Maj^ Thres. 
(mAdc) 1000, Max Bias (Vdc) 10,0 S39,9§ 

VAAIAN QALLIUM ARSENIDE GUNN DIODES MODEL VSX-9201S5 

Freq Coverage 8 to 12 4GH2. Output (Mm } lOOmW. Bias 

Voftage (Max ) I4vdc. Bias current cmAdc) Operating 550 Typ 

750 Maj(,, Threshold 850 Tup lOOOMax. S39.99 

VARl^L Co. Inc. MODEL SS 43 AM MODULATOR 

Freq Range 60 10 tSOMC, Insernon Loss 13dB Nominal. . 

Signal Port Imp 50ohms Nominal, Signal Port RF Power 

+ lOdBm Max., Moduiaiion Port BW DC to 1KHZ, Modulation 

Port Bias Ima Nominal. $24.99 



AVANTEK CASCADABLE 

MODULAR AMPLIFIERS 

Frequency Range 

Gain 

Noise Figure 

Power Output 



Gam Flatness 
Input Power Vdc 
mA 



PRICE 



Model UTO-504 


UT0 511 


5 to 500 MHz 


5 to 500 MHz 


6d& 




15dB 


tide 




2.3dBto 3dB 


+ 17dB 




- 2dB to 
-3dB 


\dB 




IdB 


+ 24 




+ 15 


100 




10 


$70 00 


PRICE 


$75.00 



jMicei M dmirmt mutt u^duda Ota dftl»CTiva mai«f i«l dor r«iiing purpoics;, ouf mvOMre tiurr^er, wj iht data 

jy^ pujT^t'w AH rBiiimi fnyfi ti* 0«cu>a CirciO«fi|i or ii ««ti vq^u ^u ^varfA/tii^i 

otuvCnv: Qn^v* at* iy0mm»r tnipcwa wiinm ifl houim ahai i«c«ipi qI cuttonwr « vdv i< ■ pan A» id cw 
tHcivindvfwl ihe cuttommi 4 notitivd Quf normal fiiiopinQ mtthoA «* ftm Fuvt Ctsu MAt4 « UPS 4cfiv^r^ v^ 
si» and waapmr of Itia p«ciUN3« Oi> tttl vqu'prnvni n »« t>f Air onifi. FOQ trn^tntifi pomt 

f^OflElGfi OAOERS An foftrgn orrdari muiT tsa iiiiicu.J4] wim casn-^r i cfiach or mcnanr ontm mMta out wi U S. 
F ^noi We mm i^rf Qui C D 't not tTaiiabta lo to>vion countf^A afki Cjeitart of pcdit aic noi an accatnauc 
lofni of p«vTntn| «{|tiat rurthar intonKa^ticm n avA^i^alHt q>n ftowil 

M-EHIR^ Monday tftfiy S^turOtT A JO Am lo &0& p Bi 

tNSURAI^CE Pi a ai a iKluda jfc Um aacn aodrticmal $1fl6{)0 ai«r %iOti QQ. tjnitmo PaffEci omy 

aROEn FORii& Ha« ofdar loitni V* i-neikidM *<iii Aftcri onjatr «» fVu* u>ni«ftiafice AdtbtEWu! i^rrr^ ^te 

B^B^ AilE: vmrnutm i ti^ ii * '^ bK hvi«»MiQ in th« t^ Ca^wM. afiil W«ti <o >« ¥Z 90 att fisher ^oynlnts *s K QD 

PREPAID ORDERS. Ordf miAt tw accomjAniaa Er^ a cmc* 

^RiCCS ^ t«* ara avtfjivct la chadttga withoui '■kotica 

FICS^PCK CKAiraE: tf pvb t^ t^i^rnad to VH^ El«CtfVbca {ki* \<a CiiltQHUi wnup miliBmi i«rf 

^Aif^ TAX: Atiiaif\A ff^m.tt aiW S% uia* ta>. i^«*] a t^gntct Afiaon* fasaJw Fai esf^ *9 curra4<i3>r on 'li* «iTn 
MHZ Eiactror^m Ail cwO*** St«OM b» B*ffOnt fiulaida of Ar^9n«, but daH< vWAtf to PATHkRa irr Armor-a Kfc wt^ 

SHOKTAQC OH it*M*rtf- AM «liifn« for UNvtaeH v dlifiAOH im«l Mr tfiHa wDtin & oairs artar naca^tt of 
sarcat Oaitn* mutt McmiAt ew ift*«tea m nwli a i and tn* data of ourenasi Cwiloman ttFtrtdi do not mtiff tm 
wfttyri irua i»Ttc panod aH i lb* rwd ^»eo'^4&4« lor itH anTr4 ord«r aa a* aih co n i« aw Dw ontef cow ipia a a. 

Oliff K» NUMBER <S rrACTir FOfI OnOCnS OML¥ 



FREOUEKCY SOURCES. iNC MODEL MS-74X 

MICROWAVE SIGNAL SOURCE 

MS'74X. Mechanically Tgnabie Frequency Range (MHij 10630 to 

11^30 00 63 to It 23GHz) Mmimum Output Power (mW) 10. Overan 

Mullipiier Ratio 106. tniernai Crystal Oscillator Frequency Range 

iUHz\ 9B 4 to 104 0. Maxtmum input Gurrenl tmA) 400 

The Signal source are designed For applications w^ere high stability 
and low noise are of prime concern these sources utilize tundamen* 
laJ transisior oscillators witfi high Q coaxial cavMies. followed by 
proadoand stable step recovery diode multipliers. This design 
allows single screw mechanical adjustment of frequency over stan- 
dard communications bands Broadband sampling ctrcu»ls are used 
to phase loch ine osciilaior to a rvigh siabitity reference which may 
be either an internal seit contained crystai osciHator. external 
primary standard or VHF synthesizer This untque technique allows 
for optimization of both FM noise and long tefm stability. List Price 
»s Snsa 00 (THESE ARE NEWj Our Prlce-^$2a0, 



HEWLETT PACKARD 1N5712 MICROWAVE DIODE 

This diode mW replace the MBOiOl, 1NS?n, 5062 2800. 

5062 2636 eel This will work like a champ in all those 

Down Converter pro|ecls. S1.5Cor 10/(10.00 

MOTOROLA MHW1172R LOW DISTORTION 

WIDEBAND AMPLIFIER MODULE. 

Frequency Range 40 lo 300 MHz , Power Gain ar 60MHz 

I6,6min lo 1 7 4maK , Gam Flatness ± 0, 1 Typ. ± 0.2 

Max. d0.- DC Suppty Voltage ^ 28vdc, RF Voltage Input 

+ 70dBmV PRICE $2SJ9 

GENERAL ELECTRIC AA NICADS 

Model i4lB905HDll'Gl 

PacK of 6 for J5 00 or 60 Cells, 10 Packs for $46 00 

These may be broken down lo individual cells. 



TERMS; DOMESTIC Prtc^•^^^, COP 0» Cradil Cird 

FOREIGN P'Kp'tia on||r< U S FuTtdt— ntoct«y ofder Qf CAShier's cr»frcM aniy. 
C.O.D.: AcccipiAbIc by lAiapivoh* ar maiJ Payment ir&m customfrr win turn by casii. money ckrd«r or cistiier'i 
ehfck Wa Aft tOiYy bul vhtf cti^nol ACCetl Darional cil#c)t^ l&f C O.D/s. 

COMFinuiNa ORMflSi W« «ou»() pfe'v' tnAr conririniiig wijvrs not tK s«nt atler a leifiphone order hu b««ifl 
P4aced IP tornpan^ policy i^eC*AtilAl*i a ^ghrglirfflirtg Drd*^ ^IUS« mArk CONRRM^NG' bolclly ai% ttit w^f 
It pro&^ems or dupiicat* iMpmcnts. occyir Ov* %& an o^^ar Mrtitcni is not iKopBTFy martietk eusiomers wifl bfi 
h«i^ Tvspon&t&ie lof Any er(atg«a incurrfMS. p«tii A t5% fnlock cnAtQe on rslumwi parts. 
Cn EOrr C A.n DS: Wt ACCE^ VASre ACaAC visa AJiO AiaEfliCAH EXPRESS- 
DATA SHEETS: kVnen^ #t ruf* aaiA sh*ti.t m ttoci*. ori ot*<ces iv4 ^^ ^AiOQif ifiem arith llwonSOf. 



gM*^ 





clecfroqic^ 



^4% 



(602) 242 3037 

f«>2) 242-M16 

2111 W. CAMELBACK ROAD 

PHOENIX AJUZO^tA »M15 

Toll FfA* MymtNtr 
800-526-0^50 






Sgb Li^J of Ativerli^er^ on p^ge f30 



73MaQAiine • November, 1982 157 



fw ^ 



tfi* 



7400 



« P^ rf wh 4 C 



MICROPROCESSOR COMPONENTS 












1|N74!illl 



ii 
If 
u 

H 

U 

M 
M 
H 
U 
H 
M 

14 

II 
14 
14 
14 
14 

14 
14 

14 
14 
14 

11 
14 
\t 
t« 
14 
11 
It 
11 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 
N 
II 
II 
II 
II 
14 
II 



tmam 



H 

tmsn 

%SI4 



^luae 
Mia? 

tmm 

?4lSlll 



u 
u 
u 

14 
M 
U 
U 
U 
H 
M 
U 
H 
II 
U 

Ii 
Ii 

M 
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CAPACITOR CORNER 



SO VOLT CEH.AMIC DISC CAPACITORS 



VllUB 14 KI49 100+ 

19 El^l J» -DG. .Lfe 

Zl of Jit .D£ .dti 

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158 73 Magazine • November, 1982 



• FM • 

• LINKS • REPEATERS • TRANSMITTERS 

• RECEIVERS • PREAfflPS • CONVERTERS 

• TRANSCEIVERS • POWER SUPPLIES • 



mNSMi™" QUALITY VHF/UHF KITS 
""""™^ AT AFFORDABLE PRICES 



FM-5 PC Board Kit-ONLY$1 59.95 

complete with controls, heatsink, etc. 




SAVE A BUNDLE ON 
VHP FM TRANSCEIVERS! 

1 watts, 5 Channels, for6M, 2M, or 220 



Jf 












¥ 



HIGH QUALITY FM MODULES FOR 




i /REPEATERS, LINKS, TELEMETRY, ETC. 





R76 VHP FM RECEIVER for 10M, 6M, 
2M, 220, or commercial bands. Fantastic 
select! vfty options. Kits from $84,95 to $ 1 09.95 

R450 UHF FM RECEIVER for380'520 MHz 
bands. Kits in selectivity opt ions from $94.95 

R11 VHP AlVl RECEIVER Kit for vhf aircraft 
band or ham bands. Only S84.95. 



• COR KITS With audio mixer and Speaker 

amplifier. OnJy $29.95. 

• CWID KITS 158 bits, field programmable, 
clean audio. Oniy $59,95. 

• A1 6 RP TIGHT BOX Deep drawn afum. case 
with tight cover and no seams. 7x8x2 inches. 
Oniy $18.00. 

• SCANNER CONVERTERS Copy 72-76, 
1 35-1 44, 240^270, 400-420, or 806-894 MHz 
bands on any scanner Wired/tested Only 379.95. 




• TS1 VHF FM EXCITER for 10M, 6M, 2M, 
220 MHz or adjacent bands. 2 Watts contin- 
uous. Kits only $54.95. 

• T451 UHFFM EXCITER 2 to 3 Watts on 450 
ham band or adjacent. Kits only $64,95. 

• VHF & UHF LINEAR AMPLfFlERS. Use on 
either FM or SSB, Power levels from 1 to 45 
Watts to go with exciters & xmtg converters. 
Kits from $69.95. 







VHF& UHF TRANSMITTING CONVERTERS VHF & UHF RECEIViNG CONVERTERS 



For SSB, CW, ATV, FM, etc. Available for 6M, 2M, 
220. 440 with many IF input ranges. Converter board 
Kit only at S79.95 (VHF) or $99.95 (UHF) or kits 
complete with PA and cabinet as shown. 



20 Models cover every practical rf and if range to 
listen to SSB. FM, ATV. etc. on 6M, 2M, 220. 440, and 
110 aircraft band. Even convert weather down to 2M! 
Kits from $39.95 and wired units. 



VHF & UHF RECEIVER 

PREAMPS- Low noise. 

VHF Kits from 27 to 300 MHz. UHF 
Kits from 300 to 650 MHz. Broadband 
Kits: 20-650 MHz, Prices start at 
$1 4,95 (VHF) and $1 8.95 (UHF). All 
preamps and converters have noise 
figure 2dB or less. 



Call or Write for FREE CATALOG 

(Send $1.00 or 4 IRC's for overseas MAILING) 
Order by phone or mail • Add $2 S & H per order 
(Electronic answering service evenings & weekends) 
Use VISA, MASTERCARD, Ciieck, or UPS COD. 



amironics, inc. 

65-RMOULRD. • HILTON NY 14468 

Phone: 716-392'9430 ^33 

Hamuonfcs'^ Is a reglstatod trademark 



•a Sf«imJSTS< CUSHCRAfT • Dmmc • HHM NCV • HUSIUR • HV-GIIIN • KOM • KmiTIIONI« ■ 



G 

W 

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POCKET WORLD RECEIVER 

enana pocktl wofW receivef— SW 1-5. plus MW 
Extremely coffiDict aiw (ighiwefgm— Daim si^Ml 
SW band spieact ddi-easy tuning * Tuning indJcatar 










yfc\ \it* MlIIk 



FR€E WRNO T SHIRT 

Above From WRNO — 
Worlds fir»1 commerctKl Q 
on Wall in SW f^adw st^ 
Ofr«r good thru 
December 3131 1982 
SPEClPy SIZE (S.M.L, and XL J 



• Up lo Va mile FM Transmuting 

• '*Hands free" VOX operation 

• Light weight— less than 9 Oz. 

Valuable atd for Amateur use in antenna in- 
stallation, tuning/pruning, field day^ etc.^ 
plus hundreds of applicaiions in home 
business, sports and recfeaiion. Uses 9 
volt baltery (not supplied^ 



pliit $3.00 
shipping 



* 8 Band, 16 Channel 

• Auto Scan • Channel 
Lockout * "Now Take it 
With You Anywhere!" 



ALEXANDER BP 4-W 
500 MAH NICAD 



POPULAR HAMFEST SPECIALS! 




24 



gg plus sz.oo 

shipping 



Fits Witson Mark ti. 
afid Mark iV plus 
Yaesu FT-207. 500 
MAH, itJ V, Nickel- 
Qadmium. 

AMECO 
PREAMPS 

»4U 13 00 

iCDnri USA ontfi 

M odei PLF-2. . . • * , $SZ.<»S 

Model PLF-2E (240V). S57.95 

Model PT-2 .......... $79.95 

Model PT-2E (240V) S84.95 




VoCom POWER POCKET 




ihippfcng 

iCont-l VSAt 

Accepts any version o( ihe IC- 
2A. appHes its output lo a i^/iae 
band rf amplihet, and delivers 
25 watts to youf mot>ile atiien^ 
na Mobile lalkoui pow^ri 




SUB-AUDIBLE TONE 
HEADQUARTERS 

ENCODERS piusS2.oo 



ICOM 
IC25A 




1 



I c>^\ IC3AT (220 MHz) 



IC4AT(440 MHz) 



29 



95 



EACH 



shipping 
(Com'l USA only^ 



We Slock ComtTiynfcafions 
SpeCJiNsts SS32 and SS'32M 
encoders for most any mobile or 
handheld dpplicalions mciud' 
ing I he very popular Icotn 
Handholds. 



ICOM IC2A. iC2AT 

• Compaci 

• Duality 
Ccpnstructicjn 

• Versatile 

• Alfofdabfe 

• Wide Range ot 
Atces&ones 
Available 

CALL FOR PftlCE & 
AVAILABILITY 




FIXED, PORTABLE And MOBILE ANTENNA VALUE FAVORITES! 

B&W PORTABLE AVANTI THRU-GLASS ANTENNA 

APARTMENT ANTENNA 



MORGAIN MULTI-BAND ANTENNAS 




Add tS 00 



80 40HD/A 30^40 Mtr bands (69f 9900 

75/40HD/A 75''40 Mtr bands (66} 94.50 

il^' !^uTa I 75-1QHD^A 75/40/20n5/10 Mtf (66) 12695 

iuoni w.^*.j jp.-ipi^Q^^ a0;40/20/l5/l0 Mtf (69) 13200 




FAMOUS EAVESOROf^PEH 
SW RECEIVING ANTENNA 



59 



95 



plus tl DO 




pluft 12.00 

tltlppLng 



Outok, aaay mountinQ. Tunes 2^ 5. 10, 
IS, 20 and 40 meter Amateur bands, 

plus SW BC bands in &omt ranges. 360 
waits SSBCW. 22V2" whip exiends to 
57". 14" mount. Includes SPase-loadrng 
coHs- Weighs less than 2 Iba. 



Tiie Avam< On Gias fs the Uni two^iMray com- 
munications antenna thai mounij on gSsss and 
transmits and recenfes ihi-ougri the giass E*- 
iremety low VSWR 4s achewsd by ad|usting 
speciii luningslugon matching netwo^^^ insjde 
the vdhic^e Can be easily fe^movad for car 
wflshea withojt special loob, 



8 



M 




sc 







TO ORDER 
HOURS: 



<---<*^j 



CALL OR WRITE. MASTER CARD, VISA, MONEY ORDERS. PERSONAL CHECKS TAKE 3 WEEKS 
TO CLEAR. ACCEPTED. INTERNATIONAL ORDERS WELCOME, PLEASE REQUEST PRO FORMA 
INVOICE ILLINOIS RESIDENTS ADD 6% SALES TAX. 

MON. THRU WED. 9.30^:00, THUflS-FRI. 9:30-8:00. SAT. 9:30-3:00 



o 



STOP BY AND VISIT WHEN IN THE CHICAGOLAND AREA!! 





RAMSEY 
ELECTRONICS 
^62 Inc. 



PARTS WAREHOUSE 



We now have available a bunch of goodies too 
good 10 bypass Items are limited so order loday 



2575 Baird Rd. 
Penfield, NY 14526 

716 586-3950 



MINI KITS - YOU HAVE SEEN THESE BEFORE NOW 

HERE ARE OLD FAVORITE AND NEW ONES TOO. 

GREAT FOR THAT AFTERNOON HOBBY. 



FM 

MINI 

MIKE 




A super high peftoffl^a^ xe f M wire- 
fesi miite ktV TfBnsfTiits i liable 
sjflriar up 10 30D yft'ds witn eicep-^ 
(lOfiai zutito ifuititv by rrtflani of iff 
built IP elect ret im>il(A Kit in^lu^e^ 
case rnike, Ofi^ff smich ini^nni 
lufte^y and super insttuciions Tms 
fs tf>e i^nflsr unit ftwuiable 

FM-3 Kit in »5 

^y-3 Wired a?Yd TesttK} if .95 




FM W»rcin« tithe Kit 

Transmits up to 300 to 

any FM b^O^ftC^st ra- 

{|iO uses any typ« of 

mike fluns on 3 lo 9V 

has added! sensitive miKe prnamp 

stage 

FM-1 ki! n.» FM-2 m t4 9S 



Type FM-2 



Cplgr Organ 

See music come 
aNve* 3 diKerent 
Itghls tl icter with, 
music One iighl 
«»ch tor, htgti, 
mid-fange and 
lows £act> (Ad I' 
vidua Jty adfusi- 
iblt and dnves up 
to 300 W runs on 
t TO VAC 

Complete Uf\. 
ML-1 



Vii^o HiDdultlor *CH 
Don'mrt^ tv^r T V iQ wdeo matyntot Super 
fictile tui^abtc over ctt 4-6 nuns on 5i> 
tSV accculi sli} vtsSBDvgnfti Bc^tumiam 
Ihftrnarhefi CormpieteM VO-t 17 -»5 



tad dllnlty Kit 
A gr^&i an em ion get- 
ter wnicf> alternaie^y 
flashes 2 jumbo LECH 
Use lor name badgies 
buttons warning 
panfi lii^ts ^nything^ 
Runs on 3 to IS vots 
Compmekft BL-1 




&uper Sleulh 
Asl !^- '^enijriveampii- 
fief ' " *<iii piC^ up a 
pn drop at 1 S fe«t* Great 
for monitofing bat^y's 
toom or as gc'nef an par- 
pose amplrfiei Fiil 2 M 
nr^ Quiput nms on € to 
IS voiis uses ft^5 onnr 
speaker 
Complete ^Ft B1SF-9 

S5^S 



Runs on 3-12 Vdc t wait 
Atarm. Aucfio OsipnatDf 



out 1 KHZ aood fof CPO 
Comptete hil $2,4S 



Whitpef Ugtii Kil 

An rnteresting kit, sma« rntke 
pick$ up sQijnds anct converts 
th-em to hgfit Th^ loudef tHe 
sound, the brrghter the light 
Includes mika. controls up to 
300 W. funs on 110 VAC 
Compleie kit WL-T 



^ 



Tone Oecodcf 

A comptete tone deco- 
de? on a smigie PC 
tsoard Features: *00- 
5000 H2 adiustable 
f^nge viaZOlurnpot vo^lagere^u- 
Ution 567 IC Useful lor rouch- 
tone t>ur$t dereclion. FSK etc 
Can also b>e used as a stable Tone 
encoder Huns on 5 to t 2 voiis 
Ccfmpieie kit TO-T I5.»5 




CaN Your Phone Order in Today 

T&I^MS: SaiJsfactmn guaranteed or money 
refunded COD add 52,00 Minimum order 
moo Orders under $1000 add SI .50. Add 5% 
to* postage, insurance, handling Overseas 

idd 15% N ¥ residents add /^'i, tax 



CLOCK KITS 

Xttut ttHi fivont** tr* Kpi^ tqmifi O^ttf T.HW Sold to Dale. 
Bt onA ol Itrt 9*ng and order youn today! 

Try youf hand at buiidrng the finest fooking clock ori the 
marktt Its satin finish anodired aluminufr case looks greal 
anywhere, while six 4" LED digits provide a highly readable 
display This is a complete kit. no extras needed and it only 
takes 1-2 hours to assemble Your choice oi case colors 
Silver gold, black (specify) 

Clock kit. 12/24 hour DC-S $24 95 

Clock with 10 mm 10 timer 12/24 hour DC-10 $29 9S 

Alarm clock. 12 hour only, DC-8 $29.95 

12V DC car dock. OC-T $29,95 

For wired and tested clocks add S10 00 to krt pnce 

SPECIFY 12 OR 24 HOUR FORMA"^ 



Car Clock 

Th« UN-ICtT. Of*l|i S HHfler connections 



I^EM 



H«tt]i t Utpt^ tooling i%i99e<j *nis •ccu'ate auto doch. Africf) i« a s^^t re Qu.<4ts a- 
■>«ifl4 C(4Ct« iff o^ig ii w e n l ift Gcmp£et«rv Ma«*nb!teJ — yOM vr^hf ^ma^ 3 *<>4^ iflfl ? 
%miie;Ht% rahtt •i»ut iS mimrt**' D^piay •% unght §reen *nh auiismAikC bfignmcMi 
CQTii^O^ pftorocfii — aA%u*9% you si a hrQtiiy readable dlisplay day or rw^nt C<yn#f if^ i 
441 m iiflif h anod^^Hl aiutnmufn cji«*t!<ieAcaiibe cttBctiedS'diFr^dt Havau9ii^2ii<l#d 
tap* C>^0*C# of t>h«r &LIIC4 0<r QOKl caft* E^MCltvi 

|Z3 9« 



OC'3 hil 1} hour rorrn*! 

OC'3 wrf*i3 *ftd i**i*g 



$»9« 



Unive^tal Timtr Kii 

fraiiitde^ ttve ba^^c ptrtg; and PC 
board required to provide a source 
pt pr^CFS.Fon tiriri'ing and putse 
generation US6i 5SB tirti^r IC irid 
includes a range of parts tor most 
timing neecfs 

UJ-S »<il SS.SS 



Mad Slailer Kit 

produces lOUO ear snatr«nrtg,and 
atitntion getting siren like sound 
Can supply up la 1^ mitts ot 
qbnojEiObs audio Runs on 6-15 VDC 



Siren fCJI 
Produces upward dnd downward 
wail ciisr^cteristjc ol a potice 
siren S W peak audio Output, funa 
on 3-15 volts, uses 3-4S ohm 
speaker 
Complete kit SM-3 $2.95 



Cal*nd»r Atirm Ctocic 

The crock malsgol ttaii 6- 5 LEDs. 
12'24 hour snooze 34 hour alarm 4 
ye*r dal^ndRr battery backup and 
lots mort Thft super 700T cfnp *s 
used Site &M4]id inches Cample le 
kit les&CAse (not aval iB bite |i 
DC 9 $34.tS 



Under Oaih Cat C^or.v 

1 «»« tPDti^uip Il411iar iHinU. mtitt pgiMiQn ^ ' • 
tuPrr iTisl^cie|u}iM £^rieH*4i Cummer iffuomAf.^ i .^ 

OC t T ckicb -ATkn tniif t>ra< ii ^ E37 tS hpi 

OM 1 dimmer Mtwprr* U SO 



MB-T Kit 



(4.tS 



iO He: Tlmv Hfti* 

Hunsort 5. IS vnC LOW CUPTpfll f? 5m»^ ■ 
rrun nnonf^ aCCU'JCv rB-f Krt IS U 

TB-7 A^ 19 *S 



ViilcD TerminBl 



PARTS PARADE 



rmtn Ho MKtr 

■ '-"ma iitipri- m-^' iij-"- 

-ip latkpiii flnd I omp'Pii* dLhcum^nlifion 

»i r)44t f«rm<nii care hir uas isooa ro^ *ired mfi.u 

I [11*'" Cflir Qpftfin 
Pfy*i*t St.ptil^ 
FIF MoitiiiKltji lii^ 



■ .-I in-i t^V 



irjriri ^Inr-t' vi-dH... ^i-Triiriii. cafJ B!e<}iJ«np^ (?n-l»fln ASCII ^»'- 

' ""Tf ilPVlJOaraconlr^J of cursor P^nt^ prrc tSfHi-.- -i-,. :■ -i Ht 
,< ■'■ I m- rj^atj iF»rJ hHs FIS ?35 infl ?amfl loOD tfiHirl««l tin tiomn Hii« 



113 H 

¥14 » 

jrts 



IC SPECIALS 



LINEAR 



3D1 
565 

sac 

6fi7 
3^00 



«► 



f .35 

S1.SQ 
11. SQ 
» 45 

t1 00 
tlOQ 

11 25 
10/12 010 

t SO 
t SO 

12 9S 
12 9^ 



4011 

4013 
4045 

4i>aa 

4Q» 
4*11 
451a 
5C^ 



CMOS 



^ 



50 
50 

ST as 
so 

$9.00 * 
£200 
Si 35 

SI 75 



READOUTS 

HPTist ire A i« 



TTL 



7dS00 

7447 

7478 

7490 

74196 



$ 40 
S e& 
$ SO 
S .&0 
SI 35 



SPECfAL 



iicao 

lOne 

720fi 

7207A 

73t6D 

7107C 

5314 

&375AB/G 

7001 



S15.D0 
S T.25 
$17.50 
S 5.50 
$21.00 
$12.50 
$ 295 
S 2.95 
$ 6.50 



Pesiitor Ass'l 

Asaortmenl of Popular values - V* 
watt Cu( lead tor PC mounting. W 
cenl&r. W leads, bag of 3<K1 or 
rtioffl 

S1.5D 



Swtlches 

Mmi toggle SPOT $1.00 

Red Pushbunons N' O 3/jl.OO 



Earphones 

iQHda Q ohm ^OOC fQT small lO^Cf 
»pffl^ers. »lHiTT\ clocks etc 
6 for $1.00 



Mini i Ohtfl Sfrt«liBr 
Appi'P'i ?'i'' iJiam I^Dufiia 
lypp fniT tad IDS Tiifce #1c 
3 lilar tZ.M 



Cryslflla 

3 579545 MHZ tl.SO 

lOOOODO MHZ SS.OO 

s s^eecso mhz is.oo 



AC Adipttri 

Good lor clochs. ninjd 
ch^rg^rf^flil 11Q VAC pluc] 
one ena 

a 5 vdc C^i 70 mA f 1 00 

1$ vac ^ IfiOmA 12 50 

1$ vat rd' ^OmA (^ DO 



SdIi^ Statff ftuavn 

sm.ali tiujjer 4S0 H; B6 dQ &Qynd 
putpul on 5-12 vdc 4I 1030 mA TTL 
[:Qmp4lrtale f1.Sj|_ 



Slug Tuned Coilv 
Small 3/16" Hes Slugs tjjrrwd coit 
3 'urns lOforSl.OO 



AC Outlet 

Panel Mount with Leads 

4/11.00 



Audio 

PraiCAier 

Make high resoiulion audio 

meflsurments. great for musical 
instfumenl tuning, PL tones, etc 
Mulhplii?s audio UP in Irequ-ency, 
seleclflbJe xlO or xlOO. gives 01 
HZ resolulion with 1 sec gate 
time' High sensitivity of 2b my, T 
mag input i and built-in filtering 
piyes gmaT periorrnance Runs 
on 9V battery, all CMOS 
PS-2 kit 129.95 

PS-2 wired S39,95 




600 MHz 



PRESCALER 't- 



Extend the range of your 
counter to 600 MHz Works 
wirh aiJ counters Less than 
150 nriv sensitivity specify - 
10 Of -100 

Wtred, tested, PS-IB $59.95 
Kit, PS-1B $44.95 



FERRITE BEADS 

*vfP inl6 »r ;■ 1-*.- I tli 11 BO 



CAPACtTORS 

1 5 uF 25V 3^51.00 
1.e UF25V3/S1.00 
22 uF 25V 3fSi 00 



ALUHINUM 

1 000 uf tfrv RtdLiLi uo 

in..;? i"^V^*T i 19 $1 DD 



PICK CfltUiK; 

01 DfV di^ ».tl « 

1 igv till 00 

myt ifiiv » 11 00 
ia?iif MrtlOO 



Soclk#li 

a Pin 10.^12 90 

14 Pm ia/ij 00 

l6Pm 10 12 00 

24 Pm 4.S2 00 

28 Pin 4^13.00 

40 P.n 1/sajifi 



TRANSISTORS 



atBiTiuHFumi 

h«>M SUM T^ofl T*A 
VMP 3Bi T^fp* T*II 



if.1i« 

IHHDB 

It'll m- 

f 9^11 « 
VII « 

4'1l OB 



»nJi 



1-not 



S 1 V Zener M/HOO 

1N914 Type S0/t1 00 

1KV 2Ajnp I'tl 00 

100V lArvip 15/t1.00 



35 AMP 

100V Bridge 

Mini-Bridge 50V 
1 AMP 

2 for $1.00 



'ditfcpfChJucvt-fSwdcpSSiftt $1 



25it 30 Turn Tnm F^x |1 .00 
IK 20 Turn Tnm PM f SO 



Ceramic IF FillAfS 

Minii ceramic fi Iters 7 kHz 

BW. 455 KMzn 50 ea 




TrtAMt*! C«f4 

^Ta^ue - 3-40 p* 

Stable Poiv$itof>yi««>e 



30 Watt 2 mlr PWR AMP 
Simple Class C power amp features 8 times power gaJn 1 Win 
1oraout.2Winfor T5ou1.4WintDf30out Maxoutputof 35 W. 
ir^Cfedibie vaiu#, complete wiJti all parts less case and T-R relay 
PA-1. 30 V^ pwr amp kit $25.95 

TR-1. RF sensed T-R relay kit 6. 95 



MRF-?34 rr«n«isior a% u^^ m f»A-i 
fl'IOd&Qftin 150 tnh; Stt^S 



RF actuated relay senses RF 

(1 W) and closes DPDT relay 

For RF sensed T-R relay 

TR-1 Kit 18.95 



Pownr Supply PCJt 

Compifle trtple ref}uli1frd powr^r 
supply provides van a&ie 6 Id ifivoilsal 
200 ma and -5 at 1 Amp Ettenen.* loid 
regutatiion gcKio tiitermg and ^maH 
Size Less tr anstormers requires 6 3V 
1 1 A and 24 VCT 
Comp^^ekil PS-3J_T tt/9S 



Small 1" diameter '. eirtick 
crvsKI m*he carlrrtjoe S.T5 



Mini RG-T74 Coa* 
10 ft- tO^ 11-00 



CoiM Connector 

Criassis mount 

BNCiype Si. 00 






OP-AMP 5p«c4al 
©I FET LF 13741 - OtrecJ f>in tor prn 741: compel itile. Ciwt 500 
input t. &upef k>«r 50 pa input cujrreni 4o» po«er dra^ 
f 1.00 10 for 



MEG 
S2,00 



'■ft! a«g 
«m bag: flS) pct ttjii ig I 



I ant 
AaTC 



£ ;^ g^idco^iiictilof 

mA-lOOa CV CidCh fnodu^ 



LHit - your choice, pleate $pe!qify 
Mini Ited. Jufnbo Red. H«9n Wlam/tf Red 
Mini Ye^kiw Jumbo YHIow. Jymtio Green 



«/t1 



VBradm 
Motorola WV Z?D9 » l>f ^cm,^a' C*p 30-K3 PF 

3Q Hch tK 3.^t 90 



runsbi* rmng« 



79MQ 
7J3 

T»05 



II 25 

f1.3i 

ISO 

IMS 

$1^0 



Rtgulatoni 



TBI? 

790S 
7912 
7915 



ti.fn 

II .M 
It .35 

IT.2S 
II 3S 



Shrink Tubing Nubt 



mm JO-92 H0»f Sinks 
Tr^i^iTdAor Bfsvl 9 tot 11.M 



Opto Isolators ' 4M26 type 

OptO Reflectors - Photo diode * LED 






s.so 

$1 00 



Msic* a^iittdy pfvci^ ■ifi iiptycn of 7 F%itKi 
ft?f ^ 4 pin vxnt'i W ■trip* lor IT 00 



CDS 
ne^-$lafkC# *^*jiM •'t*i ligfll ?S0 »hmi To 

= 1,9' J -^c'^ ] Iw 11-00 



'See tJSl a/ -At^vertisefs on P9ge 130 



73 Magazine • November, 1982 161 



DEALER DIRECTORY 



Culver Cih'CA 

Jun"^ Eleftrcmics. ^ftl9 S«piJ:lvi>f|a Blvd., CluJ^'er 

Otv CA 9O2;?'0. SiMVNCm, 'Iradis .U-kJ- taafl riiiPi 



Fontana CA 

C[}ti^l]h-l« ItneH ICOM, ni-trrruji, Ten-Tec, 
Miraji^th. CbibiL', lairartr^ (ner 4i.H.lii fhA'tmiiu- pnjcJ- 
ljl:!s for h(^bb>"i!it^ teclinicinii, cJcfK^rinwiitcr. Alwj 
CB TiitlH), kntlimobilt^. Fonlfina Elwircinicj.. SfiSS 
SiiTrtt Ave., Fontana CA ^K^35. ^22-7" 10. 



San DiegQ CA 

Wu buy anrf ?jt>3E ^jiirploN: Atitiv NavT KtiHTtniiiics, 
ai-w 1 rViuLltalyd MatvriUi. Whul tlcj >4:ni wanl 10 
m:^31'i' Writ*.' fcir cahi!<ii|^ii^. Ektimnk'to^vn, Inc 
440^7111 Avenue, PU &™ 2(I4». San LHcgtJ CA 



New Castle DE 

Fat.t«r>' Aiiii]iMi/[^l PuulurS Yatisii. IiX)M. Ti:ii- 
Tet\ KDK, ,\zdi.!n4 AEA, Katilronies^ SiiciUv. Full 
Line ijf ALti^Nuriis. Nhj ShIh^s "^;^^ iic Dt^rt^iJlM.!- 
(>[](■ riiili' uH I [f5 EfcLaviutT Aniatuur Supply.. 
71 Meadow Hoaii, Ntw C;asile DF. ia720, 
428^7728. 



San Jose CA 



K^y yTT'tt's rrt»we*^ Amatf^ir HiK.iiLi' stnR', N't-w fit 

fct^riw(.MKli^ rCX3M, ,\zdf]i, Vatsfii. Tcn-Tts.', San- 
Ili- & irniJH niiirf. Shwvcr H^idit.^ liw., iSTii So, 
ioKorn Aw., San Jtwt- <::A 1J5 128, Hiifl^na?. 



Smyrna GA 

For yrniir Kenw.'fKKL YatJs.ii. ICICM. Dr^tkt' and 
[itlttT iiriLillcUl- lie'ts.K. L^]|[U' In M*: iLs. Brill's, Twn- 
Wuv Radio, 250fi N. AUunta Rd.. Smima CA 



Prcstyn ID 

Ct.'Nu in (Ih;i liiltTtiiLiisiiijyn \Vwf.+ i\m\ ((hj Ikwf 
Friwi?.. Crtil niv im all ^'onr hiiiii SK^ibi. Ru!&. 
lJiE.tril>ulJJig. 78 Sm- Slate. Vrmhyn ID i(32*J3. 



Terre Haute IN 

VnHir hum hr^tdcjicart^'^i's Jix-iijU-ti m ti^t; b'iiri oF ttx^ 
midw<.'ht. H(M»icr Eleclnsinics^ [nt.. *S Nkadows 
Q-^ikir. P.O. lii>s i:m. lErrt- llauti- L\ 47«0O3, 

2;jsH4sr7. 



Baltimore MD 

.■^xviiyshityin^bbgra^ijt! lesl t:HjtiJpnienl HP, Telt. 
Cr. L5t}^, I'AC- \hty law inEffio'iviivr t'cmxial 6t 
wavejjpuide HP, f\r, waveliiM', ».'tt . PreJer "'K\ 

514 Ensor St .. Ba) to, .MD 2 1202 . Tifii' 1893 . 



Liltlefon MA 

'rile Rcli^sbk' EFrtroi ^txm- HE-n,in;i N.K- Full \inv. o\' 
i{^OM Ai KtinwwKi Yiiesu llTs^ Drake. Dalua, 
B&W dt.H.iusicj'dt^i- Curtis in Triu: kt-\-<.?rh. Larsci]. 
nU!**l!tM", Tei(Hi/Hx'-(.xain products. Mirairi- liJUjim.. 
A^itrtjn F,S,, Alphu Hvlty iii:[rtcx^k>r>. AllRL & 
KiiEiLp^Eik:;^ in.s;t ruction aids. WliLstk^r radar dclLi:- 
toi*. FmII iioe d uOHX fittinj^s- TEL-OOM Ek-c- 
trrmi*' rnmuninlialbiw li7S fifvat Hd. ^Ht. 119). 
Ultktua MA <Jl4tJtf. 486 34(XI;3U4«. 



Ann Arbor Ml 

Six' 1 3^ hiT pvi>6\n:is Hke Ten-'I'w, U, L. Drake, 
I>^n'|riJ]i tiJid ihan%- HK^rt^. 0[H^n M{)nduy llirtmj^h 
Saturday, (1630 to' 1730. WBe\^(;R, WIW^LLXO, 
VVaSl)k\ yEid WHllP Ix^liirjd iIh^ ,,ijuii!i,^r. l\ir- 
diH^ Radio SuppH\ 3£7 E. Hoov^^r Avt., Ann Ar- 
bor Ml 4mm. ^H^mm. 



Hudson NH 

Fvtfw England'.s Dl.strit>Ljl:f.ir jnd AulhoTiz*hd ^-t- 
viw CttiltT lot at] M«[tfr A]riAttM.]r Li cits. Tufts 
Itaditi Eleclrc^nic^, Inc., 61 Lo^'cU Boad^ Hiid>^on 

Ml h:3<5L-8H:.^5()05, 



Somersset NJ 

New Jersty'ji <jnly factorj-.aiithtjriztsi ICOM and 
Vai^n tlkltifininr, LLirpv iti^ientim" of new u.nd 
iL'itKi s^>ectals. M(m( nujcir b^iin^j^ in sttK'k. Cnim- 
pk:k-:i4^rvli?i- tihdfitcLlitii*. lUdiosiUnliriiiti^i I7(J0 
Ea-^iton Avenue, P;0. Bos 347, Sinmtnsct Nl ft!W73, 
4Hy-45mJ. 



Bufrali> NY 
WESTERN NEW VOEit 

Niaprn Kirf)itUcr".s nn3y fijj] (it<H.'ktnf; Aiiiatnir 
tk-aiyr. Aisa Sh^irhvavy, f;B, .Srriinncni. Marine, 
Commtrx-iai. C)ix^raiiii],f displays lejjtnrirjjr Kvn- 
w[.KNd and olhc-r^. "rrKwt'rs. .AnVcmiaN. Salt*; and 
Sen k:t\ DX Cdnimunieatiom, 3214 Traiuiil Kiwd, 
Wi^l Seneca NY. fifiS^S^ja. 



Amsterdam NY 
UPSTATE NEW YORK 

Kenwt*ixt, ICX>M. Drakf-, plii& manj uUter SlfR-^, 
.Amalfiir pruiltir lur iit^er 311 yt-jars. Adirtmdadk Hg- 
dio ?J].ipplv. [uc., ISli Wcsl Main Street. Anister- 
dam N¥ laOU), »42-S35{>. 



S>Tacuse-RoTT!e-Utica NY 

F^^atiiriijjar. H(i:inwtH.Kl. Yiu^u. ICIOM, DrakE-, Pt :i 
T^JC/Svvjtn, DenTron, Alpliu,, E^ohjl. MFL Tein- 
PJ3. A-stnjn, KLM, H>-(iaiiL, Mcisk-v, Ifjim-n, 
Ciishcraft, HiLstler, Mini I'nuliEt't^, Ytm wunX Ix' 
di5:app<^itil('tl with ef^uijimenti'servici.!. Hfiditt 
World, Oneida Cotinlv ATrpfirl-Tcniiinal Biiild- 
ini;, Oriskany NY 13454. 73ft-01M, 



Columbus OH 

Ths? biggest anti bt^t iliKn Sturv in ihe iiiidw^^t 
Fealitrintr qiialilv Kt'nwcKjd nrcjdutm tvith vl■■E^r•l(. 
itiji diKpla\'x, W(? sdl imly tht- liesl, Aiithtiri/wi 
KE-iturK^d Sf?r^ itt*. Universal .Aniaieiir HtfdiiP IiKir. 
12aO Aida Df,. Ru^iioldOjune (Qiiumbimf OH 
4;50«S. 8IJfM2e7. ' 

Bend OR 

Sate3lil[ii TV, Kncnvn brands. Call tirflay fur Jiuire 
inforinj.jHi)ii urid intjuirn' alwmt "ur dealer \mt- 
^iini WESPEttCOM, P.O. Bm 7226, B»j]id OH 

Philadelphia PA/ 
Camden NJ 

W"y,v[.!H;nidt'& Qiajijal Mscrfn-^ave C]oinii(>nt''nt.v& 
E[|uipinenl. Lalixiraton GratkflVsi Irisirnniuui.s. 
Ptavtt'r Supplies, Buy, Sell & Trade nil [Kipular 
rna]<;t!s~ MP. CR. FXR, FSI. Smrt'Eisen. Sinjrer. 
vie. I jtnitfuiiv Kew^nib Labv. 1423 Ferrv Ave.» 
Camden NJ (B1C>4. 541-4200. 

Scranton FA 

ICOM, Bird, Cii^litral'L Rec-kicum, Fluke. Lyr- 
wiii, Hi^dt-r, AiiU=;Oiia SiJiftialistK, AKlrtjn. Avanti. 
BeEden. W2AL1..'VV2VS, CDE, AEA, Vihrcntlv.^. 
liam-Ki^-H CES^ ArnfTlmrtitl, Sctny, FaiiDn-'Ctinri- 
er, B&\^^ Amewk, Shu re LaRue Eietlrfjsiks, 11(3 
Grand vjfw ??l„ StrHriUni FA imm, 343^^124. 

San Antonio TX 

AjiiaU"iu. Ciiriijnt'-n.ial 2- way. Selliiijk; Antenna 
SpeciaksL^, Avanti. Azdi-n, Bird. H>--Gain, Staih 
dard^ V-'ibrcples, Midland, Henn', Giishcraft, 
Dielt^'ifie, Hustler. ICOM, MFJ.' Nye Khury, 
Cu(]ic. Tt!Tr|w.j. TeitTet: acid titlier^. Applianee & 
Equipme^vt t:i>., [nc, 2317 Vfliiw Jatfoun Road. 
San Anlmio TX 7S213, 734 771i3. 



DEALERS 

Your company name and meviage 
can cojitain up to 25 wonhfora'^HitJe 
as $150 yearly (prepaid), or $15 per 
month (prepaid (fuarterty). No men- 
iifm oj mail'ordeT bttsiness or area 
code permlUed. Directory text and 
payment mu,sf reach usWdaijs in ad- 
vance of publication. For example, 
advertising for the Jan. 'S3 tevt^:^ mu^t 
he in our luiiuk by Nov. hi. Mail to 
73 h'tagiizim-f. Peterborough NH 
(msa. ATTN: Nanaj Ciampa. 



PROPAGATION 



J. H. Neisofi 
4 Ptymouth Dr. 
Whiting NJ 08759 



EASTERN UNITED STATES TO: 



GJV1T: 


W 


07 


m 


m 


OB 


10 


12 


t4 


1^ 


1Q 


ZO 


Z2 




ALASKA 


14 


7ft 


7 


7 


7 


7 


3A 


7 


7A 


1^ 


21/^ 


21 




ARGENTINA 


14 


14 


7 


7 


7 


7A 


14A 


21A 


21A 


21A 


21A 


21 




AUSTRALIA 


21 


14 


7a 


7B 


7B 


7B 


7B 


14B 


U 


14 


21A 211^ 




CANAL iQN£ 


HA 


14 


7 


7 


7 


7 


14ft 


71A 


;iiA 


?1ft 


?TA 


?1 




EMGLAND 


7 


7 


7 


3A 


7 


7 


14 


;?1A 


21A 


14 


14 


7 




HAWAII 


51 


14 


7B 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7B 


14 


21A 


2IA 


21i^ 




INDm 


7B 


7B 


7B 


7E 


7B 


7B' 


14 


21 


14 


7B 


7B 


7B 




JAPAN 


14 


7B 


7B 


7B 


7B 


7 


3;^ 


14B- 


■t4B 


14 


14 


21 




MEXICO 


21 


14 


7 


7 


7 


■J 


7A 


21 


21A 


21A 


21 


21 




PHILIPPINES 


14 


14 


7B 


7B 


7B 


7B 


3A 


14B 


14 


14 


14 


14A 




PUERTO RtCO 


1^ 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


H 


71 


?1A 


?1ft 


71 


14^*^ 




SOUTH APRlC^A 


14 


7 


7 


7B 


^B 


14 


21A 


21A 


2 m 


21A 


21A 


m 




U,S,S. R- 


7 


7' 


7 


7 


7 


_Jfi 


.14 


.^Jft 


71 


7T^ 


7R, 


7 




W£ ST COAST 


21A 


14 


7 


7' 


7 


-^ 


7 


M 


21.f^ 


21A 


2tA 


21A 




CENTRAL 


UNITED 


STATES TO: 




ALAE^KA 


14 


t'1 


7 


-I 


7 


7 


3A 


7 


7A 


14A 


21A 


21 




ARGENTINA 


14 


H 


7 


7 


7 


7 


14 


;iiA 


?.IA 


?.\A 


2m 


?A 




AUSTRALIA 


?1A 


14 


7R 


"^ 


7R 


7R 


7R 


7^^ 


14 


14 


?m 


71A 




CANAL zqNE 


2] 


14 


7 


7: 


7 


7 


14 


^1;^ 


l\f\ 


2^^ 


?Ah 


2m 




ENGLAttU 


7 


7 


7 


3A 


7 


7 


7A 


21 


2m 


^ 


14 


7 




HAWAII 


21A 


14A 


14B 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


14 


21A 


21A 


21A 




IN&IA 


7^ 


14^ 


7H 


."T3, 


7B 


7B 


7R 


14 


14 


7H 


7f3 


7B 




JAPAN 


21 


14 


71^ 


7T^ 


7B 


7 


3a 


lA 


14R 


14 


14 


?lft 




IWEXiCO 


H 


1^ 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


14 


ni\ 


krlA 


21 


/A 




PHIL 14^1 ESJE5 


?i;^ 


14 


7B 


7R 


7R 


7R 


"iA 


7 


14 


14 


14 


2m 




PUERTO RICO 


14A 


7 


7 


-I 

.. .L. 


7 


7 


14 


?1 


i?lA 


71A 


71 A 


?1 




SOUTH Al^niCA 


14 


7 


7 


■^ 


7P 


711 


14 


7^^ 


?1?^ 


?1A 


;>iA 


14A 




U. £. S. H. 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7B 


7B 


2^ 


14 


7B 


7B 


7 








J 


UNITED 


STATES TO: 




WESTE 


RP 




ALASKA 


21 


14 


7 


7 


7 


7 


3A 


3A 


7 


14 


21 


2m 




ARG^NTrtuA 


21 


14 


7A 


7 


7 


7 


7B 


21 


21A 


2 m 


zm 


21 




AUSTRALIA 


21A 


21A 


14 


1^ 


7B 


71^ 


in 


7ff 


14 


14 


?M\ 


?,m 




CANAL ZOJVE 


^1 


14 


J 


7 


7 


7 


7 


zt 


21A 


21A 


im 


21A 




glWGLAND 


7R 


7 


7 


^f^ 


7 


7 


^A 


14 


^1 


14 


14 


7R 




HAWAlf 


21A 


2^ 


14 


14 


V 


7 


7 


7 


14 


21A 


21A 


21A 




INDIA 


7B 


21 


I^B 


7B 


7B 


7B 


7B 


7B 


14 


7B 


7B 


7B 




JAPAW 


2 m 


21 


14& 


7B 


7 


7 


2A 


1ft 


14R 


14 


u 


7m 




MEXICO 


21 


u 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


14 


TilA 


.^m 


7.^ 


71 




PfllLIPPlMES 


21A 


21 


14B 


7B 


7B 


7B 


7 


) 


i ^^ 


, 14 


14 


£1A 




PUERTO RICO 


;?! 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


MP\ 


7m 


. ZJA bl Ji 


?m 




SOUTH AFRICA 


14 


7 


7 


7B 


IE 


7E 


7p 


14 


^m 


71A 


aiA 


]Ah 




U. S.S. R, 


71 


1 


7 


1 


- 


' 7P 


( 7? 


^ 1^ 


14 


7R 


7P 


7P 


1- 1 


EAST COAST 


2V 


^ 


7 1 


1 


' 7 


1 


' 1^ 


2m 


ilii 


?1A 


?lfl 


L 



A = Next highar frequency may also be useful. 
B - Difficult circuit this period. 

First letter- night waves. Second = day waves. 

G = Good, F = Fair, P = Poor. * = Chance of solar flares. 

# ^ Chance of aurora. 

NOTE THAT NtGHT WAVE LETTER NOW COMES FIRST. 



NOVEMBER 

SUN MOM TUE WED THU ^HI SAT 




1 

F/F 


2 |3 

F/G F/G 


4 

P/F 


5 

F/G 


6 1 

G/G 


7 

G/G 


8 

C/G' 


9 

P/F* 


10 

F/G 


11 

G/G 


12 13 

G/G F/F 


14 

F/F 


15 

G/G 


16 

G/G 


17 

F/G 

24 

G/G 


18 

F/F 


19 20 

P/F F/G 


21 

G/G 


22 

G/G 


23 

G/G 


25 

G/G* 


26 27 

F/G* P/F* 


|28 29 

P/F 1 P/F 


30 

F/G 





162 73Magaim& • November, 1982 



New Yaesu FT-1 02 Series 

Transceiver of Champions! 




The long-awaiteff new generation of Yaesu HF technology has arrived! New research in 
improved receiver filtering and spectral purity ts brought to bear in the competitjon^red 
FT-'102, the HF trans^lver designed for active Amateurs on today's intensely active bands! 



\lque Cascaded Filter System 

5 FT-102 utilizes an advanced 8.2 MHz and 455 kHz IF system, capable of 
iBpWng as many as three filters in cascade. Optional filters of 2.9 kHz, 1.8 
1, 6O0 Hz. and 300 Hz may be combined witti the two stock 2.9 l(Hz filters for 
crating ffexibilrty you've oever seen in an HF transceiver before fiowi 
I New Receiver Frcmt End 

lizins husky |unctK>n field-effect transistors in a 24 volt, Ngh-current iteign, 
FT'102 front end features a low-dtstortion RF preamplifier ttiat may be by- 
ised via a front panel switch when not needed. 

Notch and Audio Peak FHIer 

lighly effective 455 kHz IF Notch RKer provides superb rejection of hetero- 
1^, carriers, and ot^er annoying interference appearing wiihin the IF pass- 
id. On CW. tile Audio Peak RIter may be switched in during extreme^ tiQht 
Hjp conditions for post-detection signal enhancement. 

iriable IF Bandwidth wim IF Shift 

3 FT-102's double conversion receiver features Yaesu "s time-proven Variable 
id width System, which utilizes the cascaded IF filters to provide intermediate 
idwidths such as 2.1 kHz, 1.5 kHz, or 800 Hz simpfy by tiA^isting a dial. The 
'iable Bandwidth System is used in conjunction with the IF Shift control, 
ich allows the operator to center tlie JF passband frequency response without 
yiiig the incoming signaJ pitch. 

Jdft/NaiTow Firter Seiectton 

[lending on the exact combination of optional filters you choose, a variety of 

le/natTOw operating modes may be selected. For axample, you may set up 

I kHz in SSB/WIDE, L8 kHz in SSB/NARMW. then select 1.6 kHz for CW/ 

DE, and 600 Hz or 300 Hz for CW/NARROW. Or use tfie Variable Bandwidth 

set your SSB bandwidtti. and use 600 Hz for CW/WIDE and 300 1^ for 

'/MARFIOW! No other manufacturer gives you so much fleiibilrty in selecting 

ir responses! 

flable Pulse WMtti fMwB B^mfikm 

ition noise, the ''Woodpecker," and power line noise are modem-day ene- 

js of effective Amateur operation. The FT-T02 Noise Blar>ker offers improved 

nking action on today's man-made noise sources (though no blanker can 

Ainate all forms of band noise) for more solid copy under adverse conditions. 

(W DIstoftion Audio/IF Stage Design 

w that dynamic range, stability, and AGO problems have been largely elimi- 
ed thanks to improved technology* Yaesu's engineers have put particular 
mtion on maximizing intelligence recovery in the receiver. While elementary 
;r cascading schemes often degrade performance, the FT-102's unique blend 
crystal and ceramic IF filters plus audio tone control provides very low phase 
ly, reduced passband ripple, and hence increased recovery of information. 



Heavy Duty Three-Tukie Final Amplifier 

The FT-1 02 final amplifier uses three 6146B tubes for more consistent power 
output and improved reliability. Using up to 10 dB of RF negative feedback, the 
FT-102 transmitter third-order distortion products are typically 40 dfl down, 
giving you a studio quaJity output signal. 

Dual Metering System 

Adopted from the new FT-ONE transcefver. the Dual Metering System pfovides 
simultaneous display of ALC voltage on one meter along with metering of plate 
voltage, cathode current, relative power output, or clipping level on the other. 
This system greatly simplifies proper adjustment of the transmitter, 

Micropfione Amplifier Tone Control 

Recognizing the differences In voice characteristics of Amateur operators, 
Yaesu 's engineers have incorporated an ingenious microphone amplifier tone 
control circuit, wh^ch allows you to tailor the treble and bass response of the 
FT-102 transmitter for best fidelity on your speech pattern. 

RF Speech Processor 

The built-in RF Speech Processor uses true RF clipping^ for improved talk power 
under difficult conditions. The clipping type speech processor provides cleaner. 
more effective "punch'' for your signal than simpler circuits used in other 
transmitters. 

VOX witfi From Panel Corttrols 

The FT-102 standard package includes VOX for hands-tree operation, Both the 
VOX Gain and VOX Delay controls are located on the front panel, for maximum 
operator convenience. 

IF HonltDr Circuit 

For easy adjustment of the RF Speech Processor or for rwordlng both sides of a 
conversation, an IF monitor circuit is provided in the Iransmiter section When 
the optionaJ AM/FM unit is installed, the IF monrtor noay be used for proper 
setting of the FM deviation and AM mic gain. 

WARC Banifs Factory Installed 

The Fr-102 is factory equipped for operation on all present and proposed 
Amateur bands, so you won t have to worry about retrofrttjng capability on your 
transceiver. An extra AUX band position is available on the bandswitch for 
special applications. 



Full Line Of 

For maximum operating ftexibility. see your Authorized Dealer for details of the 
complete line of FT-102 accessories. Coming soon are the FV-102DM 
Synthesized VFO. SP-102 Speaker/ Audio Filter, a full line of optional filters and 
microphones, and the AW/FM Unit* 



Price And Spec rticai ions Subject To 
Change Withoyt Notice Of Obligation 




W 



The radlOm 






^63 



YAESU ELECTRONICS CORP., 6851 Walthall Way, Paramount, CA 90723 • (213) 633-4007 
YAESU Eastern Service Gtr., 9812 Princeton-Glendale Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45246 • (513) 874-3100 



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VBT, notch, IF shift, wide dynamic range 

TS-830S 



Now most Amateurs can afford a high- 
performance SSB;CW transceiver with 
every conceivable operating feature built 
in for 160 through 10 meters (including 
the three new bands). The TS-830S 
combines a high dynamic range with 
variable bandwidth tuning (VBT), IF shift, 
and an IF notch filter, as well as very 
sharp niters in the 455-kHz second IF. 
Its optional VFO-230 remote digital VFO 
provides five niemories. 

TS ariOS FEATURES! 

• 160-10 meters, including three new 
bands 

Covers all Amateur baridj^ frf>m LB to 
29.7 MHz tLSB, USB. and CW), including 
Ihc new 10, 18, and 24-MHz bandb. 
Receives U'^\'\'on 10 MH;^ 

• Wide receiver dynamic range 
Junction FETs (with oplimiini IMD char- 
acteristics and low noise figure) in ihc 
balanced mixer, a MOSFET RF amplifier 
opera Hug ai low level for iniprovrti 
dynamic'range (high amplificalton level 
noi needed because of low noli^ie in 
mixer J. dual resonator for each band* and 
advanced overall receiver desi|*n result 

in excellent d>Tiamic range, 



• Variable band width luning CVBT) 

Conynuuu^iy varies the IF filter passband 
width to reduce Interference. VBT and IF 
shift can be i*on I rolled independently for 
optimum irjterierttire rejection in any 
condition. 

• IF notch filter 

Tunable lii^li Q aclive circuit In 455-kHz 
second IF. lor sharp, deep notch 
charatterlsties. 

• IF shift 

Shifts IF passband ioward higher or lower 
frequencies (away rrorn interferfng 
signals} while tuned receiver frequency 
remains unchanged, 

• 6I46B final with RF NFB 

Two til4iiB s in Uie Hiial amplifier provide 
220 W PEP ISSB)/180 W DC (CWt input 
on all bands. RF negative feedback pro- 
vides optimum IMD characteristics for 
high-quality transmission, 

• Built-in digital display 

Six-digit large fluorescenl tube display, 
backed up tiy an analog dial. Reads 
actual receive and transmit frequency 
on all modes and all bands^ Display Hold 
[DM) switch. 

• Adjustable noise-blanker level 

Built- in noise bianker eliminates 

pulse- type ^Jiuch as jgnitionl 
noise. From panel threshold 
level conti"ol. 



Matching accessories for fixed-station operation: 



• SP-230 external speaker 
Willi .selectable audita flUers 

• VFO230 external digiial 
VFO with 20-Hz steps, 

ftve memories, digital display 

• AT-230 antenna tuner/ 
SWR and power meter 

• MO 50 desk microphone 
Other accessories not shown: 

• IL. \ri2\ linear amplifier 

• SM-220 Station Monilor 
■ PC-1 phone patch 



Ht -10 digital world clock 

YG-455C (500-Hz) and 
yG~455€N [250-Hz] CW 
Oilers for 455-kHK IF 
VK-88C (500-Hz) and 
YK 88C^^ [270-Hz) CW 
niters for a,B3 -MHz IF 
1 lS-5 and HS-4 
headphones 
MC-30S and MC-35S 
noise-cancelling hand 
mitTo phones 




Various IF filter options 

EKher a 500 Hz m\ HftCl or 270'Ha! 

(W 88CNI CW filler may be installed in 

the 8,83-MHz first IF, and a vcn' shaip 

500-Hi£ IYG-455C) or 250-1 Iz (YG-455CNJ _ 

CW filter is available for Uie 455-kHz J 

More flcKibility with optional digital VFO 

VFO 230 operates In 20-1 \z sk^ps nncl _ 

Inekides five memories. Ai.su h I lows split- I 
rreqiiency operation* Built-in digitai ■ 

display^ Covers aboui IO(J kHz aijove and 
below eat'h 500-kHz bar^d. 

» Built*in RF speech processor 
For added audio punch and ini:reased 
udk jK>vver in DX plleups, 
RIT/XIT 

Receiver Incremental tuning (RiTl shifts 
only the receiver frequency, to tune in 
stations slighdy off frequency. Trans- 
mitier incremental luning (XlTl shifts only 
the transmitter frequency. 

' SSB monitor circuit 
Motiitors IF stage while transmitting, to 
determine audio quality and elfect of 
speech processor. 

More information on the TS-830S is 
available from ail authorized dealers 
of Trio-Kenwood Communi<^iliatis 
nil West Walnut Street, Compton, 
C^ahfomia 90220. 

®KEN\A/aOD 

»^ p . .pacesetter tn amateur radia 






Spectffcotions and prices n^^ sitfeferf to change without notice or obtitfotiQn.